slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 101 Views
  • Uploaded on

Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response . Daniel S. Miller MD, MPH Director, International Influenza Unit Office of the Secretary Office of Global Health Affairs Department of Health & Human Services United States . 1. Influenza Is a Significant Global Health Problem.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response' - havily


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Learning from the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Response

Daniel S. Miller MD, MPH

Director, International Influenza Unit

Office of the Secretary

Office of Global Health Affairs

Department of Health & Human Services United States

1

influenza is a significant global health problem
Influenza Is a Significant Global Health Problem

The influenza virus is CONTINUOUSLY circulating worldwide, infecting humans, birds, pigs, horses, and other animals.

EVERY YEAR, the influenza virus continues to change and mutate genetically in the multi-species “mixing bowl”.

EVERY YEAR, influenza sickens hundreds of millions, hospitalizes 3-5 million, and kills 250,000 – 500,000 people worldwide.

EVERY YEAR, influenza causes large epidemics in temperate AND tropical zones.

EVERY YEAR, influenza causes large epidemics in high, middle, AND low-income countries.

global influenza surveillance
Global Influenza Surveillance

Global influenza surveillance in clinics, hospitals, and laboratories around the world monitors the movement of the influenza virus and its genetic changes on a continuous basis.

Global influenza surveillance is critical to monitoring and early warning of dangerous changes in the influenza virus (e.g. bird flu, emergence of H1N1).

Global influenza surveillance is a critical tool for risk assessment and global response to influenza epidemics and pandemics.

the role of vaccines in preventing influenza epidemics and responding to pandemics
The Role of Vaccines in Preventing Influenza Epidemics and Responding to Pandemics

Vaccination is the most effective and cost-effective tool to prevent influenza epidemics.

Vaccination is important to reduce illness and death in pandemics.

Current technologies to produce influenza vaccine production are slow, complicated, difficult, and unpredictable.

A high priority for vaccine production is to demonstrate that a vaccine is effective and safe before administering to a population.

influenza pandemics
Influenza Pandemics

Periodically, the influenza virus changes suddenly such that the human population has little or no immunity.

Global influenza pandemics have occurred for centuries, more recently in 1918, 1957, 1968, 2009.

Influenza pandemics have been relatively mild (2009) and severe (1918).

Influenza pandemics WILL occur again and are unpredictable.

Global activities to improve pandemic preparedness have increased dramatically since 2005.

slide6

Confirmed Cases of Human Infection with Novel Influenza A (H1N1) with

Known Date of Illness Onset, United States, March 28 – May 5, 2009

1

2

3

4

5

6

Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Investigation Team. N Engl J Med 2009;10.1056/NEJMoa0903810

1. Patient 1

2. Patient 2

3. Recognition of potential match between Mexico and US viruses

4. US declares a public health emergency

5. WHO raises to Pandemic Phase 4

6. WHO raises to Pandemic Phase 5

6

more pediatric deaths from flu reported in 2009 2010 season than in previous seasons
More pediatric deaths from flu reported in 2009-2010 season than in previous seasons

Pediatric Deaths Reported During

Recent Influenza Seasons

Season

Number of pediatric deaths

10

slide12

Underlying Conditions and Risk for 2009 H1N1 Hospitalization (Children)

58% of children with

underlying condition

April 15, 2009 – January 5, 2010 (n=2280)

12

underlying conditions and risk for 2009 h1n1 hospitalization adults
Underlying Conditions and Risk for 2009 H1N1 Hospitalization (Adults)

84% of adults with

underlying condition

13

April 15, 2009 – January 5, 2010 (n=4,139)

slide14

2009 H1N1 influenza

April 2009 – April 2010

  • 61 million (range: 43 m –89 m)
  • 274,000 hospitalizations
  • (range: 195,000 to 403,000)
  • 12,470 deaths
  • (range: 8,870 to 18,300)
  • 1,280 deaths aged 17 and under
  • (range: 910 to 1,880)

14