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Urine cultures: Work Flow?

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  1. Urine cultures: Work Flow?

  2. Communication Between the Clinician and the Laboratory • Since voided urine specimens are easily contaminated with periurethral and perineal flora it is the responsibility of the microbiologist to educate health care providers on methods of proper specimen collection, preservation, labeling and transport. • Health care providers should particularly be made aware that method of collection plays a large role in quantitative inoculum as well as the work up and reporting of results. • Health care providers should also be educated to inform the laboratory with requests to culture for unusual pathogens or organisms that may require longer incubation times.

  3. Approach to Laboratory Workup • Although urinary tract infections are caused by many species of microorganisms, the majority of infections are caused by relatively few species. • Many of these organisms can be found as part of the commensal urethral and fecal flora. • Influencing factors on etiology of UTI: • Age • underlying conditions • structural abnormalities • instrumentation

  4. Usual Urinary Pathogens • Gram negative bacilli are the most common organisms responsible for urinary tract infections; • E. coli • Proteus mirabilis • Klebsiella pneumoniae • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  5. Usual Urinary Pathogens • Gram positive cocci (most frequent) • Enterococcus spp. (up to 10% of UTI) • Staphylococcus saprophyticus • Most common CNS species known to cause UTI. • In adolescents and young adult women who experience their first urinary tract infection • In up to 11 % of UTI in college aged women. • Group B Streptococcus • S. aureus is much rarer as a causative agent of UTI and often represents infection in association with S. aureus bacteremia.

  6. Gram staining (if performing…) • Each bacterium seen per field corresponds to a count of 105 CFU/mL of specimen. • The presence of many squamous epithelial cells and multiple bacterial morphotypes suggests contamination.

  7. UNACCEPTABLE PROCEDURES • Do not culture: • specimens delayed longer than 2 hours without refrigeration or preservative • Foley catheter tips • bagged of a catheterized patient. • urine from a leaky container • Request a repeat specimen or obtain the information when the collection time and method of collection have not been provided. • Consider specimens obtained with the same collection method within 24 hours to be duplicate specimens. • Reculturing for proof of bacteriologic cure is not recommended. If symptoms do not respond by 48 hours, or if symptoms recur, new urine for culture should be obtained.

  8. UNACCEPTABLE PROCEDURES • Discourage submission of voided or bagged specimens from infants. A catheterized specimen should be collected. • Except for suprapubic bladder aspirates, do not culture specimens for anaerobic culture. • It is not necessary to inoculate fungal culture media when yeast cultures are requested. However, in order to recover yeast, it is important to hold the cultures for at least two overnight incubations. • We use CHROMagar Candida

  9. Reporting Results • Low-counts of Enterobacteriaceae, even in midstream urine samples, may indicate urethral syndrome or represent the early phase of infection in symptomatic patients. Always a dilemma… • Avoid reporting results as “commensal flora”. • Avoid reporting “no growth” or “negative”: Instead use < 1000 cfu/mL, < 10,000 cfu/mL

  10. REPORTING RESULTS • Regardless of the algorithm used to guide interpretation, laboratories should report cultures with interpretive guidelines to help the provider assess the clinical relevance of results. • 2 approaches; • Positive cultures can be reported with the colony count and either minimal morphologic or definitive identification of each potential pathogen isolated. OR • Send out a ‘mixed culture’ comment • Perform AST if appropriate • Unusual positive cultures should be brought to the attention of the healthcare provider.

  11. What to consider? • Quantity ? • >105 cfu/ml • Used most commonly to determine whether ID/AST should be performed • >104 cfu/ml • Used by some for the above… • Pure culture ? • Required by some laboratories in order to perform ID/AST • Some will perform ID/AST on up to 2 potential pathogens • Type of urine collection ? • Clean cath, mid stream, Foley catheter • Straight/single catheter, suprapubic aspiration, bladder, etc.

  12. Non-invasively collected Urine:(clean catch, Foley cath, urostomy, ‘bag’) • Incubate a minimum of 24 hours (16 hours?) • If growth, then if… • < 10,000 = < 10,000 insignificant growth (insiggr) • 1 organism @ > 10,000 ID/AST* • 2 organisms • Both @ > 10,000 (ID/AST* both) • 1 @ > 10,000 (ID/AST*) & 1 @ < 10,000 insiggr • Each @ < 10,000 insiggr • 3 organisms • 1 @ > 100,000 (>50,000?) (ID/AST*) & 2 @ < 10,000 insiggr • 3 in any other quantities: Mixed urine culture comment * AST if appropriate for organism

  13. Invasively collected Urine:(single/straight cath, perQ asp., etc.) • Hold a minimum of 2 overnight incubations • If growth, then… • < 1000 = < 1000 insig • 1 organism @ > 1000 ID/AST* • 2 organisms • Both @ > 1000 (ID/AST* both) • 1 @ > 1000 (ID/AST*) & 1 @ < 1000 insiggr • Each @ < 1000 insiggr • 3 organisms • 1 @ > 10,000 (>5,000 ?) (ID/AST*) & 2 @ < 1000 insiggr • 3 in any other quantities: Mixed urine culture comment * AST if appropriate for organism

  14. Positive Growth > 104cfu/ml 2 organisms 1 at > 105cfu/ml  ID/AST & Q; 2 at < 104cfu/ml  report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR • Urine specimens – noninvasively collected (plate with 0.001 loop) • Clean catch • Foley catheter • Urostomy • “Bag” < 104cfu/ml: Report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR 3 organisms 1 organism: ID/AST & Q 3 in any other quantities  report “> 3 organisms” & add mixed urine comment Both at > 104cfu/ml: ID/AST both & Q 1 at > 104cfu/ml  ID/AST & Q; 1 at < 104cfu/ml  report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR Both at < 104cfu/ml: report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR Key: ID = Identification AST = antimicrobial susceptibility testing Q = Quantitate cfu = colony forming units INSIGGR = insignificant growth

  15. Positive Growth > 103cfu/ml 2 organisms 1 at > 104cfu/ml  ID/AST & Q; 2 at < 103cfu/ml  report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR • Urine specimens – invasively collected (plate with 0.01 loop) • Single/straight cath, • Percutaneous (suprapubic) aspiration • Bladder urine • Nephrostomy tube < 103cfu/ml: Report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR 3 organisms 1 organism: ID/AST & Q 3 in any other quantities  report “> 3 organisms” & add mixed urine comment Both at > 103cfu/ml: ID/AST both & Q 1 at > 103cfu/ml  ID/AST & Q; 1 at < 103cfu/ml  report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR Both at < 103cfu/ml: report <10,000 organisms/ml INSIGGR Key: ID = Identification AST = antimicrobial susceptibility testing Q = Quantitate cfu = colony forming units INSIGGR = insignificant growth

  16. New Reference! ASM’s Cumitech 2C: “Laboratory Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections” 2009