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WWII The Home Front

WWII The Home Front

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WWII The Home Front

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  1. WWII The Home Front • Propaganda • II. Conscription • III.Make-Up of the Canadian Forces • IV. Women in WWII • V. Economic and Social Conditions • VI. Racism at Home

  2. I. Propaganda • Definition: Mass communication to achieve a goal. May be positive or negative. • Positive: Makes people feel that they are part of a group • Negative: Uses people's fears; portrays someone else as evil

  3. Dieppe and Propaganda

  4. Diepe: The Reality

  5. II. Conscription (Again) • King had come to power opposing conscriptions in in WWI • Held a plebiscite (vote) asking Canadians to decide on conscription

  6. conscription • English Canada voted YES, Quebec voted NO • "Conscription if necessary, but not necessarily conscription” - King • It was implemented at the end of the war, but few conscripts saw action in Europe – mainly for home defense

  7. III. Make-Up of the Canadian Forces • Significant shift from WW I • Active participation of visible minorities and women in the Canadian Armed Forces • No segregated units (as in WW I) • Visible minorities generally welcomed in full combat roles • Racism certainly existed on an individual basis

  8. Native Canadians • joined in huge numbers to escape poverty of the depression. • many felt loyalty to Canada • barred from joining the air force and navy at the start of the war, but eventually actively recruited

  9. French Canadians • signed up in good numbers - made up 19% of the military even though the army was still unilingual (English). Alouettes Squadron 22nd “Vandoos”

  10. English Canadians • Largest group of soldiers • signed up at the same rate, for the same reasons as other groups

  11. Ukranian Canadians • WW I “enemy Aliens” • signed up in HUGE numbers. Hitler had taken over the Ukraine. They founded the UNF (Ukranian National Federation) to recruit men. • More than 50 000 men and women served

  12. Black Canadians • Were rejected at first, but later accepted and fought at the front • Gerry Carter was Canada’s youngest officer to be made a pilot (18 years old) • Veterans were not given the same rights after the war

  13. Japanese Canadians • Many did serve, but many were rejected because of suspicion of the enemy (Canada was at war with Japan) Chinese Canadians • Many proudly served, but few accounts are recorded (especially in History textbooks!)

  14. IV. Women in WWII • Played a major role in army 50 000 in active duty (non-combatants) • 3000 overseas nurses • Served as drivers, cooks, clerks, messengers, laundresses, ferrying aircraft • Paid only 2/3 wage • Not totally accepted (by males) in the military - discrimination from permanent officers • 46 died

  15. Women in the Labour Force • Very important role • 800 000 farm work • 250 000 employed in war production (welders, drillers, electricians etc)

  16. Women’s liberation???

  17. V. Economic and Social Conditions • Society was transformed • Host of rules and restrictions • Every aspect of civilian life was under government control • Rationing (ration books)

  18. Economic and Social Conditions • Very low unemployment - not enough workers • Many women filled men's jobs - state funded daycare establish • Wage and price controls • Federal spending very high • Income taxes increased

  19. Victory bonds

  20. VI. Racism at Home • Official and unofficial racism against "enemy aliens" - German and Italian Canadians

  21. Racism at Home • Japanese internment camps • March 1942 all Japanese were moved to the interior • Property confiscated Confiscated Japanese fishing boats - B.C.

  22. Racism at Home • Families separated • Men paid 25 cents a day • Given nothing back after the war • More than 6000 were sent to Japan • Government issued official apology in 1988 and gave each internee still living $21 000. • David Suzuki was interned during WW II