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The foot. . Meters are premeasured patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables. A foot is the individual building block of a meter. They are made up of one stressed syllable , and usually, one or more unstressed syllables. . Types of feet. Iamb: duh-DUH, as in collapse (2 syllables)

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the foot
The foot.

Meters are premeasured patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables.

A foot is the individual building block of a meter. They are made up of one stressed syllable, and usually, one or more unstressed syllables.

types of feet
Types of feet
  • Iamb: duh-DUH, as in collapse (2 syllables)
  • Trochee: DUH-duh, as in pizza (2 syllables)
  • Anapest: duh-duh-DUH, as in but of course! (3 syllables)
  • Dactyl: DUH-duh-duh, as in honestly (3 syllables)
meters
Meters

Whenever a writer strings together a repetition of one of these feet (anapest, iamb, etc) in a line of poetry, we get different types of meters:

1 foot = monometer

2 feet = dimeter (repeated twice)

3 feet = trimeter

4 feet = tetrameter

5 feet = pentameter

6 feet = hexameter

Syllables + How many times a set of syllables are repeated in a line of poetry

iambic pentameter
Iambic Pentameter

One foot consists of ten syllables.

One unstressed syllable followed by a onestressed syllable

Iambic meter is also known as rising meter; it rises toward the stressed syllable.

And leave | his bro | ken play | things on | the floor.

x / x / x / x / x /

And leave | his bro | ken play | things on | the floor.

each night i d like to see a starry sky with lots of pretty lights to please my eye
Each night I’d like to see a starry skyWith lots of pretty lights to please my eye

Copy these two lines. Separate each iamb and mark each unstressed and unstressed syllable.

Each night | I’d like | to see | a star | ry sky

x / x / x / x / x /With lots | of pret | ty lights | to please | my eye

trochaic meter
Trochaic meter

The trochee

One stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable.

DUH-duh = pizza

The opposite of iambic pentameter

Written in a falling meter or away from the stress

Once up |on a |midnight |dreary, |while I |pondered,|weak and |weary.

Mark each stressed syllable and each unstressed syllable.

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Once up |on a |midnight |dreary, |while I |pondered,|weak and |weary.

Challenge: What would we call this line?

Trochaic octameter, since there are 8 sections of two syllables.

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The Anapest

Consists of three syllablesTwo unstressed syllables followed by one stressed syllableLike the iamb, rises toward the final stressOften produces a “sense” of rapid movement

oh he flies | through the air | with the great | est of ease

Divide each foot into syllables. Mark each syllable as stressed or unstressed according to the correct pattern.

x x / x x / x x / x x /

oh he flies | through the air | with the great | est of ease

the dactyl
The Dactyl

Consists of three syllables

Is the “reverse” of the anapest

One stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables

Typically used in light verse, but it has been used in serious poetry successfully.

This is the | forest pri | meval. The | murmuring | pines and the | hemlocks

scansion
Scansion
  • The analysis of the rhythm in a poem is called scansion.
  • We identify the stressed and unstressed syllables in each line
  • Determine the kind of poetic foot the line employs and the number of feet it contains or how many times the foot is repeated.