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History of the Microscope

History of the Microscope

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History of the Microscope

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Presentation Transcript

  1. History of the Microscope

  2. Microscope= An instrument that makes small objects look larger. A. The Inventors: 1. 1590 Hans & Zaccharius Janssen a. Dutch lens grinders b. made the 1st compound microscope (has more than one lens)

  3. 2. 1609 Galileo • Improved on the Janssen’s ideas • Made a microscope that could be focused

  4. 3. Anton Van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 • Dutch scientist who greatly improved lens grinding • 1st to see bacteria, yeast, blood cells, and life in pond water • Made people aware of microscopic life

  5. And now, time out for a word from your sponsor….

  6. Leeuwenhoek • Unlikely scientist • A tradesman (a fabric merchant, a surveyor, a wine assayer, and a minor city official) • No university degrees • Knew no language other than Dutch

  7. …oh Leeuwenhoek • But he had skill, he was hardworking, had an endless curiosity, and he kept an open mind • His researches opened up the world of microscopic life to scientists

  8. His Inspirations… • Leeuwenhoek saw Robert Hooke’s illustrated book Micrographia which showed Hooke’s own observations with a microscope

  9. Anton’s creations: • Made over 500 simple “microscopes” • Microscopes were simply powerful magnifying lenses • Specimens were mounted on the sharp point that sticks up in front of the lens

  10. Anton’s Microscopes: • Compound microscopes invented around 1595 • But could only magnify 20-30x • But Leeuwenhoek’s simple microscope could magnify 200x (what a great lens grinder)! • Hired a skilled illustrator to draw the things he saw

  11. All good researchers share their findings…. • 1673 Leeuwenhoek began writing letters to the Royal Society of London describing what he’d seen with his microscopes

  12. Eeeeewww… • 17 September 1683 wrote about observations on his own plaque “a little white matter, which is as thick as if it ‘twere batter” • Repeated observations on two men who had never cleaned their teeth • Found “an unbelievingly great company of living animalcules, a-swimming more nimbly than any I had ever seen up to this time. Moreover…the animalcules… seemed to be alive.”

  13. WEE BEASTIES! • These were the first observations of living bacteria ever recorded! • He soon called them his “wee beasties”!

  14. Oooh What He Saw! • Foraminifera • Blood cells

  15. CONGRATULATIONS ANTON! • After 50 years of writing to the Royal Society of London, he was elected a full member • Joined Robert Hooke, Robert Boyle, Christopher Wren and other great scientists of his day

  16. …Now, back to your notes…

  17. B. Compound Light Microscope • Has two or more lenses • Used to study cells • Most magnify to 400x • Most powerful magnifies 2000x • Most have 3 objectives • Low • Medium • High 6. Specimen MUST be thin (allows light to pass through)

  18. C. Electron Microscope • Uses electrons and magnets • Very powerful – magnifies 2 million x or more • Show specimens in 3-D • Requires TV to view image

  19. Congratulations! You’re finished.