Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Dada PowerPoint Presentation

Dada

149 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Dada

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Dada “The idea is more important than the work itself.” Mauricio Rojas

  2. What is it? • European art movement- early 20th century. • Zurich, Switzerland in 1916. • Negative reaction to the horrors of World War I. • Rejected reason and logic • Prized nonsense, irrationality, and intuition. • Involved visual arts, literature, poetry, art manifestoes, art theory, theatre, and graphic design. • Rejection of the prevailing standards in art • Anti-bourgeois and had political affinities with the radical left.

  3. How was it defined at the time? • Dada =opposite of art • Dada ignored aesthetics. • Dada was intended to offend • “[Dada] is not art, it is anti-art.” – Hans Richter • "For us, art is not an end in itself ... but it is an opportunity for the true perception and criticism of the times we live in.“ – Hugo Ball • “It is intended as a protest against this world of mutual destruction.” –George Grosz

  4. Collages: Included items such as transportation tickets, maps, plastic wrappers, etc. • Portrayed aspects of life. • Items had a meaning or a message. Hannah Höch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife, 1919

  5. Raoul Hausmann, ABCD (collage/self-portrait), 1923-1924 Raoul Hausmann, Mechanical Head[The Spirit of Our Age], 1920

  6. Readymades: Represented the most extreme form of minimalism up to that time. In selecting a urinal, Marcel Duchamp’s message was clear: Art is something you piss on. In December 2004, this piece was voted the most influential artwork of the 20th century by 500 British art professionals. Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917.

  7. Readymades could also have been made from a pre-existing art piece. • The title of this work is a pun since pronouncing these letters in French makes a sentence that resembles a vulgar expression directed at women implying sexual restlessness. Marcel Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q., 1919

  8. Kurt Schwitters, Cherry Picture, 1921 John Heartfield, Kaiser Adolf, 1932

  9. Works Cited • http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/149499/Dada • http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Art_History/Periods_and_Movements/Dada/ • http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/dada/ • http://members.peak.org/~dadaist/Art/index.html • http://www.dadart.com/dadaism/dada/index.html