3 rd Annual Progress Energy Symposium UCF Solar Farm: Photovoltaic Array – Mounting System - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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3 rd Annual Progress Energy Symposium UCF Solar Farm: Photovoltaic Array – Mounting System

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  1. 3rd Annual Progress Energy SymposiumUCF Solar Farm:Photovoltaic Array – Mounting System Project Engineers: Daniel Gould Connie Griesemer Ryan Lewis Jonathan Torres Ryan Tribbey College of Engineering and Computer Sciences Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

  2. Purpose: UCF’s Climate Action Plan • In 2008 UCF spent $12.5 Million in Electrical Consumption • Approximately 4-9% increase annually • February 2007 President Hitt took a stand for sustainability and to become a climate neutral campus by 2050 Carbon Mitigation Energy Conservation Energy Efficiency Fuel Switching Renewable Energy

  3. UCF Solar Farm – Project Site Area of Site – 3 Acres ; equivalent to 0.6 MW

  4. 11 Vertical Panels over Twin Cylindrical Horizontal Rails, 4 Support Posts per Rail (8 total) Total Weight – 917 lbs Overall Size – 38’ 6” x 4’ 9” Distance between arrays – 5’ Total Number of Panels – 3934 Total Number of Arrays - 357

  5. Side Profile – Attachment System Bushing 3.5 ft Bracket 1 ft Set at Optimal Angle of 29o

  6. Wind Load Analysis(Wind Flowing Front to Back) Vertical Lift = -4778 lbf

  7. Wind Load Analysis(Wind Flowing Back to Front) Vertical Lift = +4132.5 lbf

  8. The Final Module

  9. Special Thanks To: 3rd Annual Progress Energy SymposiumUCF Solar Farm:Photovoltaic Array – Mounting System • Sponsor – UCF Sustainability & Energy Management, David Norvell, PE CEM • Faculty Advisor: Nina Orlovskaya, Ph.D. • Technical Advisors : • Patrick Robinson, Florida Solar Energy Center • James Nelson, Kennedy Space Center • College of Engineering and Computer Sciences, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

  10. 3rd Annual Progress Energy SymposiumUCF Solar Farm:Photovoltaic Array – Monitoring System Project Engineers: Michael Gannon Michael Peffers Muhammed Ali Khan Ahmad Buleybel College of Engineering and Computer Sciences Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 

  11. Solar Farm - Project Overview • Design a panel by panel monitoring system • Monitoring system must be self sustaining • Wirelessly transmit data • Data will be collected every 5 minutes for duration of the day • Publish real time information online • Data must be graphed for easy interpretation • Publically accessible

  12. Solar Farm - Solar Panels • 11 Solar panels used – Sharp Nu-U240f1 • 240 Watts • 37.4 Volts • 8.65 Amps • Weight: 44.1lbs/ 20.0 kg • These panels will be connected in a series circuit with one another • Locally distributed 39 inches 64.5 inches

  13. Solar Farm - Design Goals & Objectives • Monitor each panel for: • Voltage • Temp • Current • Display data online in real time • Transmit data from field to web server wirelessly

  14. Solar Farm - Primary Circuit Board System Power • This board will handle power to the whole system for all components • Change channels on the Multiplexers that were implemented • Handle all wireless communication RJ45 Cable Optical Sensor 16:1 Multiplexer Power to whole system PIC18F87J11

  15. Solar Farm - Secondary Circuit Board • Board will consist of three separate sensors • Voltage, Current, and Temperature • All sensors are hardware designed to an accuracy at least ± 1.5% Solar Panel Current Sensor Temp Sensor Voltage Sensor 4:1 Multiplexer

  16. Solar Farm - Multiplexer • A multiplexer or MUX is a device that combines several electrical signals into a single signal. There are different types of multiplexers for analog and digital circuits. • Programming the MUX gives desired values. Figure: Pin Out for 4:1 Mux

  17. Actual Secondary PCB LM351 Op-Amp Voltage Regulator Temperature Sensor

  18. Solar Farm - Wireless Technology • XBee PRO 802.15.4 • Range - Indoor Range 300 ft. - Outdoor Range 1 mile • No monthly fee • Low complexity. • Perfect for low-data transfer. • Very low power requirement. • Two modules, transmitter and receiver.

  19. Solar Farm – Wireless Transmission

  20. Solar Farm – Real Time Monitoringwww.ucfprojecthelios.co.cc

  21. Special Thanks To: • Sponsor – UCF Sustainability & Energy Management, Dave Norvell, PE CEM • Technical Advisor – Dr. Samuel Richie • Mechanical Engineers: Industrial Engineers: • Daniel Gould Amanda Longman • Connie Griesemer Joshua MacNaughton • Ryan Lewis Andrew Wolodkiewicz • Jonathan Torres • Ryan Tribbey

  22. UCF Photovoltaic Solar Farm Project Amanda Longman Joshua MacNaughton Andrew Wolodkiewicz

  23. Presentation Outline • Why Photovoltaic? • Goal of the Project • Prototype Design • Forecast Analysis • Conclusions • Future Considerations

  24. Why Photovoltaics at UCF? • Energy from the sun is renewable • Power guaranteed for 25 yrs • Clean, environmentally friendly, and silent • On-site energy production • Capacity is available on campus • President John Hitt engaged UCF in the President’sClimate Commitment General Reasons UCF-Specific Reasons

  25. 13 Florida Colleges and Universities1 • Eckerd College • Florida Atlantic University • Florida Gulf Coast University • Florida International University • Hillsborough Community College • New College of Florida • Stetson University • University of Central Florida • University of Florida • University of Miami • University of North Florida • University of South Florida • Valencia Community College 1Obtained from http://www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org/ April 4, 2011

  26. Solar Farm Project Goals • Conduct a feasibility study of constructing a 3-MW solar farm on the UCF main campus • 3 MW will supply approximately 15% of the peak energy demand on the main campus (Norvell, 2010) • Project involves constructing design prototype • Multidiscipline senior design team (MEs, EEs, and IEs)

  27. Prototype Design • Sharp NU-U240F1 (240 W) Solar Panel • Selection driven by low shipping costs from local distributor • Fixed mounting system • Minimal maintenance • Supports 11 solar panels • Individual panel monitoring • Allows for immediate control of system malfunctions

  28. Forecast AnalysisPrototype Benefits2 • Take 0.548vehicles off the road • Eliminate CO2 emissions from 0.339homes • Eliminate CO2 emissions from 117propane cylinders used for home barbeques • Save UCF $283.30/year Each year, the prototype (0.003 MW) can: 2 Obtained from http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/calculator.html#results, April 4, 2011

  29. Forecast AnalysisTransitioning from 0.003-MW Design to 3-MW Design • Panel requirements: 11panels to 12,507panels • This requires 1,137 arrays • Space is necessary between rows • Land requirements: 240 sq ft to 653,400 sq ft • 0.006 acres to 15 acres • More than 11 football fields

  30. Forecast Analysis3-MW Design Benefits3 Each year, the 3 MW Solar Farm Can Eliminate: • Greenhouse gas emissions from approximately 623 vehicles • CO2 emissions from the electricity use of 386 homes • CO2 emissions from 132,487 propane cylinders used for home barbeques • $322,110/year from UCF energy bill 3 Obtained from http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/calculator.html#results, April 4, 2011

  31. Future Considerations • Florida weather conditions • Variation in daily output Sunny Day CloudyDay

  32. Future Considerations 2006 – 17% Eff. 3.5 kW • Advancements in solar technology • Increased efficiency • Decreased costs 2006 – 14% Eff. 3.5 kW 1988 – Experimental Thin Film 3.5 kW Corner of University Dr. & Econlockhatchee Trl.

  33. Photovoltaic Solar Farm Project Outcomes • Success of this project is greatly influenced by the multidisciplinary nature of the design team • Additional resources needed for large-scale expansion • This study supports the University’s commitment of becoming climate-neutral

  34. Team Accomplishments • Mechanical Engineers designed the mounting system • Electrical Engineers designed the monitoring and communication system • Industrial Engineers computed the design forecasts for a 3-MW solar farm

  35. Acknowledgments University of Central Florida Corporate Thanks • Client: Mr. David Norvell • Asst: Gina Spahi • Faculty Advisors • Dr. Christopher D. Geiger (IEMS) • Dr. William J. Thompson (IEMS) • Dr. Samuel Richie (EECS) • Electrical Engineering Design Team • Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Team • Progress Energy • Kennedy Space Center • Florida Solar Energy Center • Superior Solar