assessing student learning outcomes in college union programs and services l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 29

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 201 Views
  • Uploaded on

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services. Association of College Unions International Region 2 Conference SUNY Oneonta November 8, 2008. Presenter. Patricia Francis, Associate Provost for Institutional Assessment and Effectiveness SUNY Oneonta.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services' - fola


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
assessing student learning outcomes in college union programs and services

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services

Association of College Unions International

Region 2 Conference

SUNY Oneonta

November 8, 2008

presenter

Presenter

Patricia Francis, Associate Provost for

Institutional Assessment and Effectiveness

SUNY Oneonta

session topics
Session Topics
  • Why student learning outcomes in Student Affairs?
  • Assessment “basics”
  • Developing a unit assessment plan, with a focus on objectives and measuring outcomes
  • Good assessment practices in college unions – Review and examples
  • Hands-on opportunity to develop objectives/ measures
session learning objectives for participants
Session Learning Objectives for Participants
  • To learn about the newly emerging focus on direct student learning outcomes in student affairs divisions in American colleges and universities
  • To examine examples of these outcomes, with an emphasis on those from college union programs and services
  • To develop outcomes specific to their areas of responsibility
student learning outcomes in student affairs rationale
Student Learning Outcomes in Student Affairs: Rationale
  • Recent transformation in higher education
    • From inputs to outcomes
    • Heightened emphasis on personal development as primary goal of undergraduate education
    • Recognition that co-curricular environment is as important as the classroom
  • Important question: How do student development professionals intentionally create conditions that enhance student learning and personal development?
important assumptions underlying a learning oriented student affairs division from acpa 1996
Important Assumptions Underlying a “Learning-Oriented Student Affairs Division” (from ACPA, 1996)
  • Characteristics of a college education person range from complex cognitive skills to the ability to apply knowledge to practical problems to a “coherent integrated sense of identity”
  • The concepts of learning, personal development, and student development are intertwined and inseparable
  • Experiences in and outside the classroom – and on and off campus – contribute to student learning and development
  • Learning and personal development occur through transactions between students and their environments broadly defined
and last but not least
And Last, But Not Least

“Student affairs professionals are educators who share responsibility with faculty, academic administrators, other staff, and students themselves for creating the conditions under which students are likely to expend time and energy in educational-purposeful activities.”

some assessment basics
Some Assessment “Basics”
  • Establishing congruence among institutional goals, programmatic and unit objectives, and assessments
  • Using a variety of measures, both quantitative and qualitative, in search of convergence
  • Using existing data sources as much as possible
  • Assessment as an ongoing, iterative process
  • Assessment as an opportunity for continuous dialogue, professional development and, most important, improving student services
assessment s four steps
Assessment’s Four Steps
  • Setting objectives: “What you say you do”
  • Objective mapping: “How you do what you say you do”
  • Assessment: “How you know you are doing what you say you do”
  • “Closing the loop”: “What you do next based on results”
    • Assessment without #4 = Waste of time!
developing a unit assessment plan

Developing a Unit Assessment Plan:

Focus on Objectives and Measures

questions to ask at the beginning
Questions to Ask at the Beginning
  • Does the division/unit mission statement explicitly address student learning and personal development as primary objectives?
  • Do staff understand, agree with, and perform in ways congruent with this mission?
  • How can staff be more intentional about promoting student learning/development (and still provide needed services)?
  • What measures should be in place to demonstrate effectiveness and inform practice?
overall unit objectives would reflect
Overall, Unit Objectives Would Reflect:

Institutional effectiveness performance indicators

Documentation of all services and programs offered

Consideration of all constituents served

Tracking of use of services (and by whom)

Student satisfaction with services/programs

Direct impact of services/programs on students

components of a good objective
Components of a Good Objective
  • Who is the target?
  • What domain of student development is the target (behavioral, cognitive, attitudinal)?
  • What activity is expected to lead to change?
  • What change is expected?
but other things to keep in mind
But Other Things to Keep in Mind

Do you have a program/activity in place to bring about outcome?

Can desired change in students be measured?

How will you know you were successful?

Do external standards apply (i.e., in case of external accreditation/certification)?

objective writing rule 1 focus on student not program
Objective Writing Rule #1: Focus on Student, Not Program

Good example: “The employee effectively utilizes the eTime system to punch in/out and to review personal records.”

Poor example: “The College Union will emphasize to student employees the importance of reporting to work on time and keeping personal records.”

objective writing rule 2 use concrete language and action verbs
Objective Writing Rule #2: Use Concrete Language and Action Verbs

Good example: “Employees will demonstrate a good working knowledge of customer service principles and display these principles in their daily work.”

Poor example: “Our objective is to enhance students’ sense of and commitment to customer service.”

objective writing rule 3 focus on results not process
Objective Writing Rule #3: Focus on Results, Not Process

Good example: “Employees will demonstrate clear and accurate knowledge regarding the College’s policies and procedures for student employment.”

Poor example: “Students will attend workshop that focuses on college policies and procedures related to student employment.”

basic principles
Basic Principles
  • Measurement techniques must be rigorous, since unreliable data are of minimal value
  • Best to use variety of quantitative and qualitative measures
    • Quantitative easier, but not often as rich
    • Qualitative often more informative, but require check on scoring (e.g., rubrics)
  • Indirect measures have value, but should never be sole indicator of effectiveness
  • Rely as much as possible on existing data sources
types of information to include
Types of Information to Include
  • Survey data
    • SUNY SOS
    • NSSE
    • Local surveys of student satisfaction/ perceptions
  • National benchmarking data (e.g., ACUI)
  • Performance-based data
  • Focus groups

1. Normative/benchmark information whenever possible (external sources, own performance over time)

2. Locally collected data

from measures to criteria
From Measures to Criteria
  • Assessment criteria reflect your expectations about student performance (i.e., how you know you were successful)
  • Set criteria at reasonable but challenging levels
  • Often take these forms:
    • “90% of students will …..”
    • “80% of students will score at least 70% on…”
authentic performance based assessment the value of rubrics
Authentic, Performance-Based Assessment: The Value of Rubrics
  • Rubrics provide reliable means of rating student performance in more qualitative way
  • Steps in developing rubrics
    • Use entire staff to help develop and be as specific as possible in differentiating between performance levels
    • Use existing rubrics as guide
    • Pilot test to assure scoring is reliable
san jose state university
San Jose State University

As a result of development opportunities, training and work experience, student employees will be able to:

  • demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills;
  • improve their time management skills;
  • enhance their problem solving skills;
  • develop planning and teamwork skills; and
  • demonstrate their understanding of ensuring a safe work environment.
davidson college
Davidson College

Student employees will demonstrate the ability to:

  • work with others to provide services and produce programs for the greater community;
  • coordinate major events such as Spring Frolics, including the planning and handling of all aspects of event production;
  • manage large-group challenges and handle complaints; and
  • work independently with minimal staff supervision.
assessing student learning outcomes in college union programs and services29

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in College Union Programs and Services

Association of College Unions International

Region 2 Conference

SUNY Oneonta

November 8, 2008