WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology

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  1. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology • Task (10 minutes) • Read ‘On a Portrait of a Deaf Man’. • Highlight all of the lines which describe old, happy memories • In a different colour, highlight all of the gruesome images of a decomposing body • Why do you think the poet wants us to see this contrast?

  2. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology Task (10 minutes) What attitude does the poet have towards death and religion? You, God, who treat him thus and thus, Say ‘Save his soul and pray.’ You ask me to believe You and I only see decay. Extension Specifically, which words or phrases show this attitude?

  3. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology Task (5 minutes) Find three similarities between the final lines of ‘Ozymandias’ and ‘On a Portrait of a Deaf Man’. ‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away. You, God, who treat him thus and thus, Say ‘Save his soul and pray.’ You ask me to believe You and I only see decay.

  4. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology Task (10 minutes) Compare how the final lines of these poems show the poets’ attitudes to death and God(s). ‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away. You, God, who treat him thus and thus, Say ‘Save his soul and pray.’ You ask me to believe You and I only see decay.

  5. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology • Task (10 minutes) • What have each of these examples done well? • How could they be improved? Example 1 Both talk to God and sound like they don’t like him. They both talk about decay which tells us they think when you die you rot away, which is disgusting. They are both obsessed with death. Example 2 In ‘Ozymandias’, the poet shows how everything falls into ‘decay’ eventually, even things which were once-great, like the monument of Ozymandias. ‘On a Portrait of a Dead Man’ uses ‘decay’ as the final word of the poem to reinforce the gruesome reality of death.

  6. WALT: engage with key ideas in poetry from the AQA anthology Task (10 minutes) Improve your own answer using these model answers to help you. Example 1 Both talk to God and sound like they don’t like him. They both talk about decay which tells us they think when you die you rot away, which is disgusting. They are both obsessed with death. Example 2 In ‘Ozymandias’, the poet shows how everything falls into ‘decay’ eventually, even things which were once-great, like the monument of Ozymandias. ‘On a Portrait of a Dead Man’ uses ‘decay’ as the final word of the poem to reinforce the gruesome reality of death.