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CHL 208

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CHL 208

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  1. CHL 208 Introduction to Multicultural Children’s Literature

  2. Contact Information • Professor:  Dr. Annette Wannamaker • Office: Pray-Harrold 603L • Office hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 12:15 - 2 p.m. Wednesdays 5 - 6:30 p.m. Other times by appointment.

  3. E-mail: awannamak@emich.edu Date: Sept 2, 2008 From: Cutiepie24@aol.com Re:______________________________ Wut r the bks 4 ur class

  4. E-mail: awannamak@emich.edu Date: Sept 2, 2008 From: TSmith@emich.edu Re: Books for Fall CHL208 Hello Dr. Wannamaker, I am a student in your Fall CHL208 class that meets Tuesdays at 11 a.m. Could you please forward a list of books required for the course? Thanks, Tammy Smith

  5. In-class writing • Get out your notebook or a scrap piece of paper. • I’m not collecting these, so don’t put your name on it, and don’t worry about writing neatly -- these are prompts to give you a moment to think before you participate in a class discussion about the questions.

  6. About CHL 208 CHL208 is an EMU General Education U.S. Diversity Course Why do you think EMU requires all students to take at least one course in U.S. Diversity? What are your expectations of a course in U.S. Diversity? What are your concerns?

  7. In all EMU General Education U.S. Diversity courses, students will… • Examine the complexity of their own cultural identities and how these relate to the cultural identities of others in the U.S. • Explore the causes and consequences of social intolerance in the U.S. • Examine the differences between social intolerance and institutionalized racism, ethnocentrism, and exclusion in the U.S. • Explore how diversity has affected and continues to affect income distribution, economic mobility, political access, and the democratic process in the U.S. • Develop an awareness of alternative values, views, and communication styles in the U.S.

  8. Writing prompt No. 2: These seem like very “adult” concerns! Do you think works of literature written for a younger audience, children ranging in age from pre-school through adolescence, work to address issues like these? In what ways?

  9. Why and how might we use children’s literature to study these issues? • Examine the complexity of their own cultural identities and how these relate to the cultural identities of others in the U.S. • Explore the causes and consequences of social intolerance in the U.S. • Examine the differences between social intolerance and institutionalized racism, ethnocentrism, and exclusion in the U.S. • Explore how diversity has affected and continues to affect income distribution, economic mobility, political access, and the democratic process in the U.S. • Develop an awareness of alternative values, views, and communication styles in the U.S.

  10. Syllabus: Schedule for Reading and Assignments: Wednesday, September 3: • Introduction to course Monday, September 8, and Wednesday, September 10: • How do we define “multicultural children’s literature”? What are the major issues to consider when discussing multicultural literature written for and shared with child readers?

  11. Reading Schedule Monday, September 15: • Read Chapters 1-2 in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Wednesday, September 17: • Read Chapters 3-5 in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Monday, September 22: • Finish reading Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

  12. Reading Schedule Wednesday, September 24: • Read chapters 1-10 in Number the Stars Monday, September 29: • Finish reading Number the Stars

  13. Reading Schedule Monday, October 6: • Read pages 1-80 in Esperanza Rising Wednesday, October 8: • Finish reading Esperanza Rising

  14. Reading Schedule Monday, October 13: • Read The Circuit:Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child

  15. Reading Schedule Wednesday, October 15: • Read pages 1-117 in Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution Monday, October 20: • Finish reading Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution

  16. Reading Schedule Monday, October 27: • Read pages 1-79 in Persepolis. Wednesday, October 29: • Finish reading Persepolis.

  17. Reading Schedule Wednesday, November 5: • Read: American Born Chinese

  18. Reading Schedule Monday, November 10: • Read pages 1-75 in The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Wednesday, November 12: • Read pages 76-151 in The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Monday, November 17: • Finish reading The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

  19. Reading Schedule Wednesday, November 19: • Read pages 1-100 in Monster Monday, November 24: • Finish reading Monster.

  20. Reading Schedule Monday, December 1: Introduction to Picture Books. • Read The Snowy Day

  21. Reading Schedule Wednesday, December 3: • Read Freedom Summer

  22. Reading Schedule Wednesday, December 10: • Read Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters

  23. Reading Schedule Wednesday, December 10: • Read Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China

  24. Reading Quizzes During the course of the term, students will take 18 (pop) quizzes based on the reading due for that day’s class.

  25. Reading Quizzes It is very important to me that students taking a literaturecourse read all or most of the literary works assigned. Therefore, completing the assigned reading will count for a significant portion (30 percent) of the course grade.

  26. Reading Quizzes • Students who regularly attend class are more likely to succeed. • Therefore, the quiz grading system is also designed to encourage regular and punctual attendance. • If you attend every class and complete all the assigned reading, the quizzes are an opportunity to earn extra credit points in the class! • Students who earn 60 extra credit points can, potentially, raise their grade for the course by almost an entire letter grade!

  27. Reading Quizzes • Each quiz is worth 20 points and quizzes count for 30 percent, or 300 points, of your final grade for the course: • 20 points x 15 quizzes = 300 points • plus 3 extra quizzes x 20 = 60 extra credit points (18 quizzes = possible 360 points) • This means you can miss up to three quizzes and still earn full credit for the quiz grade.

  28. Reading Quizzes • If you come to class too late to take the quiz, you will earn a zero on that day’s quiz. Students should come to all classes on time. • It is not acceptable to take the quiz, and then leave class. This is rude. (If you don’t want to attend classes, then please drop the course).

  29. Reading Quizzes • If you are absent, you earn a zero on that day’s quiz. • Quizzes cannot be made up after class and cannot be taken early before class begins. • The reason quizzes cannot be made up is because they count as extra credit and because they serve as the attendance and participation grade for the class.

  30. Reading Quizzes • I assume most students will need to miss a class or two because of illness or family matters and I also assume that most students will not always be able to complete every bit of the reading. • If, for example, you miss two days of class and then have a few other days when you don’t complete all the reading and only earn some of the points on a few quizzes, it is still possible to get full credit, or an A+, (300 points) for the quiz grade!

  31. Reading Quizzes/Attendance • In this way, the quizzes work as your attendance grade, and a few “excused” absences are built into the grading system. • Every student gets three “excused” absences. Absences above and beyond these three— for any reason —will lower your grade.

  32. Reading Quizzes/Attendance • Please plan accordingly and use your “excused” absences wisely.

  33. Department Attendance Policy • The official English Department policy is that students who miss two weeks worth of a class (four class periods in a course that meets twice weekly) should expect to fail that course and should withdraw from the course.

  34. Assignments and Grading Scale: • Points out of 1,000 and Assignments: • 300:18 Reading quizzes @ 20 points each (possible total of 360 points) • 300:Three tests: 100 points each • 200: Essay No. 1: Position paper
 • 200: Essay No. 2: Definition paper • 1000 points (with possible total of 1060 points with extra credit for attendance and quizzes)

  35. 1000-940=A 939-900=A- 899-870=B+ 869-840=B 839-800=B- 799-770=C+ 769-740=C 739-700=C- 699-670=D+ 669-640=D 639-600=D- <600=Failing grade. Grading Scale:

  36. Three Tests: 100 points each • Test No. 1: Wednesday, October 1 • Test No. 2: Monday, November 3 • Test No. 3: Monday, December 15 during Exam Week at the Final Exam time: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

  37. Three Tests: 100 points each • For each exam, students will answer short essay questions, which will be graded on the level of detail included, the ability to demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the material discussed, and the ability to apply knowledge by drawing comparisons among texts and by using concepts learned during the course to discuss specific works of literature.

  38. Three Tests: 100 points each • Students will be required to demonstrate a comprehension of materials covered in all assigned reading (whether or not the reading is discussed in the class lecture) as well as all materials covered in class lectures and discussions like literary terms, definitions, key debates in the field, the historical/cultural contexts for works of fiction, and literary analysis.

  39. Three Tests: 100 points each • I will do a brief review before each exam, but students are responsible for creating their own “study guides” based on material covered for the course. • It is the student’s responsibility to take careful notes in class or to get notes from a friend in the case of an absence.

  40. Two essays: 200 points each Wednesday, October 22: • In-class Writing Workshop for Essay No. 1: Position Paper Monday, October 27: • Turn in Essay No. 1: Position Paper (final revision with drafts attached) Monday, December 8: • Turn in Essay No. 2: Definition Paper

  41. Essay No. 1: Position Paper • Students will write a typed double-spaced 4-5 page (12 point type) position paper that develops an interpretation of one or more novels. Students can write about a specific theme, symbol, or issue of their choosing.

  42. Essay No. 1: In-class workshop • We will have an in-class writing workshop for the first essay so that students can have the opportunity to carefully revise and edit their papers before turning them in. Students who do not attend the writing workshop, will lose 10 points from the paper grade. I will accept late papers. Papers turned in after the due date will lose 10 points per late class day.

  43. Essay No. 2: Definition Paper • Students will write a typed double-spaced 4-5 page paper that uses the texts we have read for class, within the context of discussions we’ve had during the course of the term, in order to develop a definition of multicultural children’s literature.

  44. Plagiarism Policy: • If you plagiarize all or a portion of your essay (cut and paste from the Internet, borrow a paper from a friend) you will earn a Zero for the assignment and will most likely fail the course. • When in doubt: Ask for help!!!

  45. Politeness Policies: • Be on time. • When you come to class late, it is disruptive to everyone around you. If you cannot make it to class on time (11 a.m., not 11:02 or even 11:01) please drop the course.

  46. Politeness Policies: • Turn off your cell phone and put it away. • It is not okay to text message during class. • If you are expecting a very important call (your wife is about to have a baby, for instance) you can talk to me before class to let me know that your cell phone will be on and may go off. Otherwise, turn it off and put it away.

  47. Politeness Policies: • No laptops! • I used to allow students to take notes on laptops, but too many students abused this by poking friends on Facebook and playing World of Warcraft during class. • Students with documented disabilities may, of course, bring a laptop or other special equipment to class.

  48. Politeness Policies: • Come to class prepared. • We cannot have a discussion about a text if students have not done the assigned reading. Since our classes are based on the assumption that students have read all the assigned material, most often, you will not get a lot out of our discussions if you didn’t do the reading. Also, it is a lot more fun to participate in a discussion about a book you’ve just read.

  49. Politeness Policies: • Pack up only after class is over. • Putting your books into your backpack five minutes before class is over is very disruptive to students around you trying to listen and take notes. Please be considerate of others around you.

  50. Politeness Policies: • Stay in the classroom. • Walking in and out of the classroom during class (unless, of course, there is an emergency) is very disruptive. Please take bathroom breaks between classes, not during class.