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Speaking the Speech

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  1. Speaking the Speech

  2. The Balcony Scene But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were!

  3. Punctuation, Breath, & Meaning But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it;cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were!

  4. Commas=short pauses End stops=longer pauses But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it;cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were!

  5. No punctuation…no stopping But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it;cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love! O, that she knew she were!


  6. Ideas run together But,soft!What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it;cast it off. It is my lady,O,it is my love! O,that she knew she were!

  7. You could re-set the text But,soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon,Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O,it is my love! O,that she knew she were!

  8. Use the meter and the sound to convey meaning But,soft! What light through yonder window breaks? …Bloody,bawdy villain! Remorseless,treacherous,lecherous,kindless villain! O,vengeance!

  9. To -ed or not to -ed Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house (lowered) In the deep bosom of the ocean buried. Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths; Our bruised arms hung up for monuments; Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings, Our dreadful marches to delightful measures. Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barded steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.

  10. Meaning & Gesture But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks, Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass; I, that am rudely stamp'd, and want love's majesty To strut before a wanton ambling nymph; I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deformed, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun And descant on mine own deformity: And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, I am determined to prove a villain And hate the idle pleasures of these days. Plots have I laid… Richard III Act 1 Scene 1 - YouTube

  11. Blocking But,soft!dive behind tree What light through yonder window breaks? peek out from tree It is the east,and Juliet is the sun. Arise,fair sun,and kill the envious moon,Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: point at moon Be not her maid,since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O,it is my love! sink to the ground O,that she knew she were! Romeo and Juliet Balcony Scene - YouTube

  12. Who are you talking to? Soliloquy Monologue/Speech Song Dialogue

  13. Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain? I see thee yet, in form as palpable As this which now I draw. Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going; And such an instrument I was to use. Mine eyes are made the fools o' the other senses, Or else worth all the rest; I see thee still, And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood, Which was not so before. There's no such thing: It is the bloody business which informs Thus to mine eyes. Now o'er the one halfworld Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace. With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear Thy very stones prate of my whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives.A bell rings I go, and it is done; the bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven or to hell.Macbeth - YouTube

  14. What's he that wishes so?My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin:If we are mark'd to die, we are enowTo do our country loss; and if to live,The fewer men, the greater share of honour.God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;It yearns me not if men my garments wear;Such outward things dwell not in my desires:But if it be a sin to covet honour,I am the most offending soul alive.No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:God's peace! I would not lose so great an honourAs one man more, methinks, would share from meFor the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,That he which hath no stomach to this fight,Let him depart; his passport shall be madeAnd crowns for convoy put into his purse:We would not die in that man's companyThat fears his fellowship to die with us.This day is called the feast of Crispian:He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,And rouse him at the name of Crispian.He that shall live this day, and see old age,Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,But he'll remember with advantagesWhat feats he did that day: then shall our names.Familiar in his mouth as household wordsHarry the king, Bedford and Exeter,Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.This story shall the good man teach his son;And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,From this day to the ending of the world,But we in it shall be remember'd;We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;For he to-day that sheds his blood with meShall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,This day shall gentle his condition:And gentlemen in England now a-bedShall think themselves accursed they were not here,And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaksThat fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.Henry V St. Crispin's Day Speech - YouTube

  15. The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much To mitigate the justice of thy plea; Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there. Merchant of Venice - YouTube

  16. SIR TOBY BELCH Come on; there is sixpence for you: let's have a song. SIR ANDREW There's a testril of me too: if one knight give a-- CLOWN Would you have a love-song, or a song of good life? SIR TOBY BELCH A love-song, a love-song. SIR ANDREW Ay, ay: I care not for good life. CLOWN O mistress mine, where are you roaming? O, stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low: Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know. What is love? 'tis not hereafter; Present mirth hath present laughter; What's to come is still unsure: In delay there lies no plenty; Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty, Youth's a stuff will not endure.Twelfth Night Feste's Song - YouTube

  17. PETRUCHIO Good morrow, Kate; for that's your name, I hear. KATHARINA Well have you heard, but something hard of hearing: They call me Katharina that do talk of me. PETRUCHIO You lie, in faith; for you are call'd plain Kate, And bonny Kate and sometimes Kate the curst; But Kate, the prettiest Kate in Christendom Kate of Kate Hall, my super-dainty Kate, For dainties are all Kates, and therefore, Kate, Take this of me, Kate of my consolation; Hearing thy mildness praised in every town, Thy virtues spoke of, and thy beauty sounded, Yet not so deeply as to thee belongs, Myself am moved to woo thee for my wife. KATHARINA Moved! in good time: let him that moved you hither Remove you hence: I knew you at the first You were a moveable. PETRUCHIO Why, what's a moveable? KATHARINA A join'd-stool. PETRUCHIO Thou hast hit it: come, sit on me. KATHARINA Asses are made to bear, and so are you. PETRUCHIO Women are made to bear, and so are you. KATHARINA No such jade as you, if me you mean. PETRUCHIO Alas! good Kate, I will not burden thee; For, knowing thee to be but young and light— KATHARINA Too light for such a swain as you to catch; And yet as heavy as my weight should be. PETRUCHIO Should be! should--buzz! KATHARINA Well ta'en, and like a buzzard. PETRUCHIO O slow-wing'd turtle! shall a buzzard take thee? KATHARINA Ay, for a turtle, as he takes a buzzard. PETRUCHIO Come, come, you wasp; i' faith, you are too angry. KATHARINA If I be waspish, best beware my sting. PETRUCHIO My remedy is then, to pluck it out. KATHARINA Ay, if the fool could find it where it lies, PETRUCHIO Who knows not where a wasp does wear his sting? In his tail. KATHARINA In his tongue. PETRUCHIO Whose tongue? KATHARINA Yours, if you talk of tails: and so farewell. PETRUCHIO What, with my tongue in your tail? nay, come again, Good Kate; I am a gentleman.

  18. Advice to the Players Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue. But if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, by use all gently, for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise. I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant. It out-herods Herod. Pray you avoid it.Be not too tame neither, But let your own discretion be your tutor.Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature.For anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature, to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure. Now this overdone, or come tardy off, though it make the unskillful laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve, the censure of the which one must in your allowance o'erweigh a whole theatre of others… And let those that play your clowns speak no more than is set down for them, for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too, though in the mean time some necessary question of the play be then to be considered. That's villainous and shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it. Go make you ready.