Marveling at the Results: Effective Leadership and Teacher Collaboration - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Marveling at the Results: Effective Leadership and Teacher Collaboration Florida Gulf Coast University December 1, 2011 Kristin Davies Beth Gedde Monica Gregory Lynne Scott Shannon Schaal Jennese Morauski

  2. Professional Learning Communities http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAlZRwCPO9w

  3. Hickory Ridge High School • Demographics • Student Population • 1,800 students • 15% Special Education • 46% White • 40% African-American • 12% Hispanic • 2% Asian or other • Staff Population • 40% < 30 years of age • 40% >= 51 years of age and older • ¾ White, not of Hispanic origin • 60% earned Master’s Degrees

  4. Need for Change • Various reforms initiated unsuccessfully • Chosen to be model school • Become a technologically driven, innovative school system • Implement throughout Wingfield District

  5. Need for Reform • Main issues • Transformation within the school culture • Effective leadership – both administration and teachers • Teacher collaboration and collegial coaching “Meaningful participation is a cornerstone of professional communities - a stone that we often leave unturned” - Lambert

  6. Need for Cultural Change • Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) • Develop vision/mission statements • Collaborative process • Common interests, goals, aspirations

  7. Effective Leadership • Management and Leadership • Expected to be a combination of both • Develop skills and knowledge • Successful leadership Practices • Leadership affects learning • Many sources (stakeholders) of leadership within a school • Create vision and culture that focuses on teaching and learning • Respond to policy demands and guide successful actions • Respond to diversity and build communities that expose cultural capital

  8. Effective Leadership • Dynamic Leadership • Forecasting • Sustaining • Planning

  9. Implementing School Reform • Reform effort led by strong leader • Change agent • Teacher leaders • Change Process • Stage 1: what needs to be changed • Stage 2: are people ready for change • Stage 3: Increase knowledge • Stage 4: Examine data and more needs of change • Implement Professional Learning Communities

  10. Support and Empowerment • Culturally empowered department • Analysis of current department culture and governance • Compelling vision of empowered organization • Sharing information with department stakeholders • Sharing authority, tasks, and accountabilities • Commitment to ideas, not personalities • Autonomy within boundaries • Replacing the old hierarchy with self-directed teams

  11. Support and Empowerment • Professional Development • Attend to needs of teachers • Built upon inquiries and concerns • Facilitate development of mutual relationships • Promote opportunities for advocacy • Types of Professional Development • Communities of practice • Active Support

  12. Technology • Technological Implementation • Participate in staff development opportunities involving integration of technology into daily lessons • Departments will create projects that incorporate technology

  13. Activity • Develop our own PLC by combining separate ingredients

  14. References • Birky, V.D., Shelton, M., & Headley, S. (2006). An administrator’s challenge: Encouraging teachers to be leaders. NAASP, 87-101. • Brody, D., & Hadar, L. (2011). “I speak prose and I now know it.” Personal development trajectories among teacher educations in a professional development community. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1223-34. Retrieved from Education Full Text Database. • Cherif, A., et. al. (2010). Strengthening the academic department through empowerment offacultyand staff. Academic Leadership, 8(2), Spring 2010. Retrieved from Education Full Text Database. • Cunningham, W.G. & Cordeiro, P.A. (2009). Educationalleadership: A bridge to improvedpractice, 4th ed. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. • Flint, A. S., et. al. (2010). Not a one-shot deal: Generative professional development experienced teachers. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1163-9. Retrieved from Education Full Text Database. • Lambert • Leithwood, K, & Riehl, C. (2005). What we know about successful school leadership. New York: Teachers College Press. • Nelson, S., Guerra, P. (2008) 4-stage process changes individuals and entire schools. J Staff Dev 29 no 2. Retrieved October 2, 2011, from http://www.nsdc.org. • Peters, A.L. (2011). (Un) planned failure: Unsuccessful succession planning in an urban district. Journal of School Leadership 21 (1), 64-86. • Toogood, S. (2008). Interactive training. Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, 33(3), 215-224. Retrieved from ERIC database.