L.O.1 To be able to count on or back in equal steps including beyond zero. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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L.O.1 To be able to count on or back in equal steps including beyond zero.
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L.O.1 To be able to count on or back in equal steps including beyond zero.

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  1. L.O.1 To be able to count on or back in equal steps including beyond zero.

  2. We are going to count up in 25’s. Q. Will we meet the number 450 if we go up in 25’s? How do you know?

  3. We shall start at 1000 and count back in 25’s. You will need to say the next number before it is written down. We shall go round the class taking it in turns. Q. What will happen when we get to zero?

  4. We shall count on and back in steps of 0.5. We’ll start at 0 go up to 10 then back to -5.

  5. We shall count on and back in steps of 0.1. We’ll start at 0 go up to 4 then back to -2.

  6. i In your book write the numbers we reach if we follow these rules: Start Steps Size Direction Finish number • 675 6 25 Forward 825 • 350 7 25 Back 3. 15 8 0.5 Back • 7 12 0.1 Forward • 86 15 0.5 Back • 3 27 0.1 Back • 425 19 25 Forward • 298 35 0.5 Forward Make up some more to test your partner.

  7. L.O 2 To be able to recognise reflective symmetry in regular polygons. To make and investigate a general statement about familiar shapes by finding examples that satisfy it.

  8. This square is folded. Q. What do we call the line created by this fold?

  9. It is called a “line of symmetry” Q. Are there any other lines of symmetry in the square?

  10. Q. In what other way can we find lines of symmetry?

  11. A line of symmetry is sometimes called a mirror line and sometimes called a line of reflective symmetry

  12. Using mirrors find and draw in the reflective symmetry of the other polygons on Activity sheet 5a1. Copy into your book and investigate this statement: “The number of lines of symmetry of a regular polygon is always the same as the number of edges.”

  13. Do the same with this: “Irregular polygons have no lines of symmetry.” Are the two statements true or false? How do you know?

  14. We know that the first statement is true but the second is false as there are irregular polygons which have lines of symmetry. LOOK! Both these shapes are irregular but have lines of symmetry. Where are the lines of symmetry?

  15. Q. Are the number of lines of symmetry on a regular polygon always the same as the number of sides or edges? Q. Is there a rule we can make? Q. Is there a shape which does not fit this rule?

  16. The vertical line is a line of symmetry. Draw the completed shape neatly in your book. Q. How many edges will the completed shape have?

  17. Q. Is the shape a regular hexagon? Why?

  18. The shape is irregular and has ONE line of symmetry. Q. Will all irregular hexagons have one line of symmetry?

  19. This irregular hexagon has no lines of symmetry.

  20. Q. Can we write down two statements that we think are true? • Regular polygons have the same numbers of lines of symmetry as they have sides or edges. 2. Irregular polygons can have lines of symmetry.

  21. By the end of the lesson the children should be able to : Recognise that the number of axes of reflective symmetry in regular polygons is equal to the number of sides. Find examples that match a general statement, for example, a regular hexagon has 6 sides and 6 lines of symmetry.

  22. L.O.1 To be able to visualise 2-D shapes and to recognise lines of symmetry.

  23. Close your eyes and visualise a square. Imagine there is a line joining the mid-point of two sides which are next to each other. Cut along this line. You now have two shapes. Q. What are the names of these shapes?

  24. You might have thought of this. You have an isosceles right-angled triangle and an irregular pentagon.

  25. Q. Do the two shapes have any lines of symmetry?

  26. This is the line which gives both shapes symmetry.

  27. This is the line which gives both shapes symmetry. You might be able to understand better if the square is rotated like this.

  28. Close your eyes again and imagine that the mid-points of the other two sides of the original square were also joined. Cut along this line so that you now have three shapes. Q. What are the three shapes? Q. Do they have lines of symmetry?

  29. ` You might have thought of this. You have TWO isosceles right-angled triangles and an irregular hexagon.

  30. ` These are the lines of symmetry. The triangles have ONE line of symmetry but the hexagon has TWO!

  31. L.O.2 To be able to complete symmetrical patterns with two lines of symmetry at right angles.

  32. Complete the shape on the sheet OHT 5a.1 you have been given. Measure accurately and carefully. There are TWO lines of symmetry. Before you begin try to think what the final shape will look like.

  33. This is the shape you were given

  34. You should have drawn something like this.

  35. We’ll use another shape. I need a volunteer to complete this on the board. Q. Does it matter if we use a horizontal or vertical line of symmetry first?

  36. Complete the shapes on Activity sheet 5a.2

  37. Q. How many sides has each of the finished shapes? Notice: The number of sides on each finished shape is an even number. Why is this? Has “doubling” anything to do with it? The shapes are all polygons because they have straight sides and are all irregular.

  38. Write the area of the shape on grid1 then complete the shape using the line of symmetry and record the area of the drawn shape. Predict its area mentally first! Write the prediction rule then finish the other shapes. Does your rule work?

  39. By the end of the lesson the children should be able to: Complete patterns squared paper with two lines of symmetry at right angles.

  40. L.O.1 To be able to visualise 2-D shapes and to recognise lines of symmetry.

  41. You are going to close your eyes and visualise a shape as you did yesterday. This time you have a rectangle. Join the mid point of the longer side to the mid point of the shorter side and cut along that line so the rectangle is in two shapes. Q. What are these two new shapes?

  42. You should see something like this. One shape is a scalene right-angled triangle. The other is an irregular pentagon.

  43. Q. Do the two shapes have any lines of symmetry?

  44. Neither shape has a line of symmetry. Now imagine a rectangle as before. Imagine a line from the mid-point of a longer side to the mid-point of a shorter side and a line from this mid point to the mid-point of the other long side. Q. How many new shapes are made? What are their names?

  45. You should see something like this. There are two scalene right-angled triangles and a pentagon. Only the pentagon has a line of symmetry.

  46. This shows the ONE line of symmetry.

  47. L.O.2 To be able to recognise parallel and perpendicular lines.

  48. Here are a pair of parallel lines. We know they are parallel because the perpendicular distance between them is constant. Q. Write in your books any pairs of parallel lines you can see in the classroom. Check them carefully.

  49. Q. Are there any parallel lines on shape 1? The use of arrows shows the parallel lines. What about the other shapes? Which ones do not have pairs of parallel sides?