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Mentoring New Nursing Faculty

Mentoring New Nursing Faculty

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Mentoring New Nursing Faculty

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  1. Mentoring New Nursing Faculty Sara Thompson, MSN, APN

  2. Objectives • Describe issues encountered in transition from clinical practice to faculty positions • Identify models of mentoring • Describe characteristics of mentors • Discuss barriers to mentoring • Identify resources to develop a mentoring program

  3. Background • Doctoral preparation • Gold standard for baccalaureate faculty • Shortage of doctorally prepared nurses • MSN: minimum requirement to teach in undergraduate nursing programs

  4. APN Transition • APNs clinical role • Nine to five direct patient care • Five days a week • Institution and department policies and politics • APN faculty role • Class schedule • Planning, preparation, and grading • Student pressures • Committee work • Institution and division policies and politics • Scholarship

  5. An APN Story • Once upon a time in a small liberal arts college • Employ two new full-time faculty members each year for three years to fill vacant positions • Four vacant positions remain at the end of three years • Overwhelmed • PhD vs. MSN politics • Tenure issues (not only nursing) • Money and family issues

  6. Significance • Faculty retention 55% over ten years • Less for women • AACN survey: Nursing average 2.9 faculty vacancies per school • Significance • Cost to replace faculty • Time for recruitment and orientation • Efficiency of educational system

  7. Analysis of Faculty Retention Evidence • Role conflict/ambiguity • Collegiality/relationships • Greatest faculty satisfier • Greatest source of dissatisfaction

  8. Analysis of Faculty Retention Evidence • Department leadership • Sets tone and culture of the department • Support for new faculty members • Professional autonomy • Academic freedom • Institutional culture and policies • Departmental culture and policies

  9. Analysis of Faculty Retention Evidence • Mentoring • Modest satisfier • Lack of mentoring a great dissatisfier • Salary and benefits • Less important than other factors in faculty retention

  10. Mentoring • New faculty • Support of leadership • Support of experienced faculty • Throughout academic career • Scholarship • Leadership

  11. Formal Mentoring • Functional mentoring program • Match mentor and mentee interests • Share scholarly project • Time limited • Formal mentoring design • Outline of goals to meet • Expand on orientation • Develop relationships • Time limited

  12. Informal Mentoring • Peer mentoring • New faculty • Experienced faculty • Scholarship • Leadership • May not be available to all faculty

  13. Mentor Characteristics • Trustworthy • Accessible • Competent • Good match • Caring

  14. Barriers • Workload issues • Mentors takes time • Low salaries • Volunteer vs. paid • Release time

  15. Resources • American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) • Education Scholar • National League of Nurses (NLN) • Tool Kit • Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) • Mentor/mentee workshops

  16. Conclusion • Caring is foundational in nursing • Caring through mentoring new faculty • Successful development • Retention • Research suggests benefits of mentoring regardless of method

  17. QUESTIONS?