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CHAPTER 17. The Principle of Linear Superposition and Interference Phenomena. Interference Constructive and Destructive Interference: BEATS Standing Waves: Transverse-Stringed Instruments and Longitudinal-Wind Instruments. Diffraction Speakers. Beats with tuning forks.

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the principle of linear superposition and interference phenomena

CHAPTER 17

The Principle of Linear Superposition and Interference Phenomena

Interference

Constructive and Destructive Interference: BEATS

Standing Waves:

Transverse-Stringed Instruments

and

Longitudinal-Wind Instruments.

Diffraction

Speakers

simulation of beats
Simulation of Beats

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com:8100/legacy/college/cutnell/0471151831/concepts/index.htm

beat wave pattern
Beat Wave Pattern

A 10-Hz soundwave and a 12-Hz sound wave, when added together, produce a wave with a beat frequency of 2 Hz. The drawings show the pressure patterns (in blue) of the individual waves and the pressure pattern (in red) that results when the two overlap.

17 4 beats6
17.4 Beats

Musical instruments are tuned by listening to the beat frequency. For instance, a piano tuner listens to the beats produced between the string and a source with the correct frequency. The piano tuner adjusts the tension in the string until the beats vanish, ensuring that the string is vibrating at the correct frequency.

17 5 transverse standing waves8
17.5 Transverse Standing Waves

A standing wave is an interference effect that can occur when two waves overlap.

17 5 transverse standing waves9
17.5 Transverse Standing Waves

A standing wave is an interference effect that can occur when two waves overlap.

Standing waves can arise with transverse waves, such as those on a guitar string, and also with longitudinalsound waves, such as those in a flute.

17 5 transverse standing waves10
17.5 Transverse Standing Waves

A standing wave is an interference effect that can occur when two waves overlap.

Standing waves can arise with transverse waves, such as those on a guitar string, and also with longitudinalsound waves, such as those in a flute.

In any case, the principle of linear superposition provides an explanation of the effect, just as it does for diffraction and beats.

simulation of standing waves
Simulation of Standing waves

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com:8100/legacy/college/cutnell/0471151831/concepts/index.htm

problem 25
Problem-25

The G string on a guitar has a fundamental frequency of 196 Hz and a length of 0.62 m. This string is pressed against the proper fret to produce the note C, whose fundamental frequency is 262 Hz. What is the distance L between the fret and the end of the string at the bridge of the guitar (see Figure 17.20b)?