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Author: Gary Soto Genre: Autobiography. Big Question: Why do people try to change themselves?. Small Group Timer. Review Games. Story Sort Vocabulary Words : Arcade Games Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words. Spelling Words Negative Prefixes.

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Author: Gary Soto Genre: Autobiography


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Author: Gary Soto Genre: Autobiography Big Question: Why do people try to change themselves?

    2. Small GroupTimer

    3. Review Games • Story Sort VocabularyWords: • Arcade Games • Study Stack • Spelling City: Vocabulary • Spelling City: Spelling Words

    4. Spelling WordsNegative Prefixes

    5. Big Question: Why do people try to change themselves?MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday

    6. Vocabulary Words More Words to Know Vocabulary Words • bluish • cartwheels • gymnastics • hesitation • limelight • skidded • somersault • throbbing • wincing • backflips • solitary • spindly • champion • competitive • develop • perfected

    7. Monday

    8. Today we will learn about: • Build Concepts • Draw Conclusions • Visualize • Build Background • Vocabulary • Fluency: Punctuation Clues • Grammar: Using Who and Whom • Spelling: Prefixes: Negative Prefixes • Improving Ourselves

    9. FluencyPunctuation Clues

    10. Fluency: Punctuation Clues • Listen as I read “The Winning Stroke.” • As I read, notice how I use punctuation as a guide to pause at certain places or raise my voice in excitement. • Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

    11. Fluency: Punctuation Clues • Do you think Jerry will turn out to be a champion swimmer? • Make a generalization about the sport of competitive swimming.

    12. Concept Vocabulary • champion– person that wins first place in a game or contest • competitive– involving trying to win something • develop– to work to have something • perfected - removed all faults from • (Next Slide)

    13. champion

    14. Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

    15. Build Concept Vocabulary champion, competitive, develop, perfected Improving Ourselves

    16. Draw Conclusions, VisualizeTurn to Page 484 - 485.

    17. Prior KnowledgeWhat do you know about gymnastics?

    18. Prior Knowledge • This week’s audio explores the topic of gymnastics. After you listen, we will discuss the challenges of learning the sport.

    19. VocabularyWords

    20. Vocabulary Words • bluish– somewhat blue • cartwheels– sideways handsprings with the legs and arms kept straight • gymnastics– a sport in which very difficult exercises are performed • hesitation – act of failing to act promptly • limelight – center of public attention and interest

    21. Vocabulary Words • skidded– slipped or slid sideways while moving • somersault– to run or jump, turning the heels over the head • throbbing– beating rapidly or strongly • wincing – drawing back suddenly

    22. More Words to Know • backflips – backwards somersaults performed in the air • solitary– without companions • spindly – very long and slender • (NextSlide)

    23. cartwheels

    24. gymnastics

    25. somersault

    26. backflips

    27. skidded

    28. GrammarUsing Who and Whom

    29. my cousin, whom is two years younger, always copy me • My cousin, who is two years younger, always copies me. • serena is inpatient to grow up but she still acts imature • Serena is impatient to grow up, but she still acts immature.

    30. Using Who and Whom • People admired an athlete who could somersault without hurting himself. • The underlined pronoun who acts as the subject of a dependent clause (who could somersault without hurting himself) in this complex sentence.

    31. Using Who and Whom • People sometimes confuse the pronouns who and whom when they write. Who is a subject form. It is used as a subject of a sentence or clause.

    32. Using Who and Whom • Who made this mess? (Who is the subject of the sentence.) • I saw a performer who could do four back flips. (Who is the subject in the dependent clause who could do four back flips.)

    33. Using Who and Whom • Whomis an object form. It is used as the object of a preposition or as a direct object. • To whom did you send a letter? (whom is the object of the preposition to) • Whom will you ask? (whom is a direct object)

    34. Using Who and Whom • The subject (you) does not come first in a question. Don’t be fooled if the subject does not come first.

    35. Using Who and Whom • To understand why Whom is used in the second sentence, change the word order so that the subject comes first: (Whom will you ask? becomes You will ask whom?) This makes it easier to see that whom is the direct object.

    36. Using Who and WhomHow is the underlined word used: subject, object of preposition, or direct object? • Who asked for athletic tape? • subject • That is the gymnast with whom I study. • object of preposition • He is an athlete who one tried out for the Olympic team. • subject

    37. Using Who and WhomHow is the underlined word used: subject, object of preposition, or direct object? • Whom have you told? • direct object • I told my cousin, who is only eleven. • subject

    38. Using Who and WhomUnderline who or whom to complete each sentence correctly. • (Who, Whom) is your favorite athlete? • Who • I disagree with Alan, (who, whom) likes basketball players. • who • About (who, whom) is that article written? • whom

    39. Using Who and WhomUnderline who or whom to complete each sentence correctly. • (Who, Whom) did you choose? • Whom • I chose Tiger Woods, a golfer for (who, whom) I have great respect. • whom

    40. Using Who and WhomUnderline who or whom to complete each sentence correctly. • Have you heard of Arthur Ashe, a tennis player (who, whom) died of cancer? • who • He was a tennis champion (who, whom) the public greatly admired for his style. • whom

    41. Spelling WordsNegative Prefixes

    42. Tuesday

    43. Today we will learn about: • Word Structure • Draw Conclusions • Generalize • Vocabulary • Fluency: Echo Reading • Grammar: Using Who and Whom • Spelling: Negative Prefixes • Social Studies: Gymnastics • Improving Ourselves

    44. Vocabulary Strategy: SuffixesTurn to Page 486 - 487.

    45. The GymnastTurn to Page 488 – 493.

    46. FluencyEcho Reading

    47. Fluency: Echo Reading • Turn to page 493, first two paragraphs. • As I read, notice how I pause at commas, dashes, and periods. • We will practice as a class doing three echo readings of these paragraphs.

    48. GrammarUsing Who and Whom