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Game Design with Kodu Game Lab

Game Design with Kodu Game Lab

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Game Design with Kodu Game Lab

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  1. Game Design with Kodu Game Lab

  2. Introductions • Richard Olsen Assistant Director, ideasLAB • Ashley Spagnol Eltham Primary School

  3. Kourse Overview Module 1 What is Kodu Game Lab What is a Game Module 2 Solve three tutorials Learn about bots and objects Write our first program

  4. Kourse Overview Module 3 Generate Game Ideas Look at School Examples from Australia Design templates used by students Module 4 Design Patterns and Code Recipes Game Space

  5. Kourse Overview Module 5 Game Progress Game Play Game Communication Module 6 Design Process Debugging and Troubleshooting

  6. Kourse Overview Module 7 Next Steps Getting Help Online KoduKup

  7. Module 1

  8. Kodu Team Hello

  9. Activity 1.1 Introduce Yourself If you were a game character what would you be like?

  10. Activity 1.1 Name: Imberius Powers: The ability to steal food from others without being detected. 3 Things that make me special: • Stealth • Pick pocketing • Charm

  11. Activity 1.2 Kodu is a visual programming language made specifically for creating games. It is designed to be accessible for children and enjoyable for anyone. The visual nature of the language allows for rapid design iteration using only an Xbox game controller for input (mouse/keyboard input is also supported).

  12. What is Kodu Game LAB? • Visual programming language aimed at kids for rapid game development • 3D worlds and game play • Xbox Controller or Keyboard and Mouse • Currently in Technical Preview • Small Games

  13. What does it take to teach kids to program? • What has been excluded: • Loops • Branching • Variables • Typing • Syntax Errors

  14. What does it take to teach kids to program? • So what has been left in? • Objects • Message Passing • Sensors • Filters • Actuators • Modifiers

  15. Huh?

  16. What CAN YOU MAKE?

  17. Activity 1.3 What is a game? Record the names of five (5) of your favourite games in the space provided in your manual.

  18. Activity 1.3 What are the key factors that makes a game, a game?

  19. Activity 1.3 • Games are fun. • Games have rules. • Games have an objective. • Games have winners and losers. • Games require players to make decisions and require skill. • Games are an experience.

  20. Activity 1.3 “If you’ve written a software subroutine that takes more than ten arguments, look again. You probably missed a few. ” Alan Kay “A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude.” Jesse Schell

  21. Activity 1.4 Game Review Name: Bonk-Out Objective: Knock over the castles while protecting the sticks. Rules: The A button launches the pucks. Push bots can also launch pucks. Pucks destroy everything but the player. The player can control the pucks by bouncing them away. Why is it fun? The game is fun because it is simple and fast moving.

  22. Activity 1.4 Share what you find……

  23. Module 1: Recap We have covered: • Rationale for using Kodu Game Lab • The definition of a game • Examples of games made with Kodu Game Lab

  24. Module 2

  25. Activity 2.1: Tutorial 1 Objective: Kodu wants to visit the castle.

  26. Activity 2.2: Tutorial 2

  27. Activity 2.2: Tutorial 3

  28. Activity 2.3: Getting to Know the Bots and Objects

  29. Activity 2.4: Programming Bots Physical Sensors

  30. Activity 2.4: Programming Bots Physical Actions

  31. Activity 2.4: Programming Bots WHEN sensor filter DO action modifier

  32. Activity 2.5: Programming Bots Our first game: Ideas • Tag • Treasure Hunt Requirements • 1 bot that the player controls • 1 bot controlled with AI

  33. Activity 2.5: Programming Bots

  34. Module 2: Recap We have covered: • We have completed Tutorials 1,2 & 3 • We met the bots and objects • We have an understanding of the Kodu Game Lab programming language • We have written our first program

  35. Module 3

  36. Activity 3.1: Generating Game Ideas If we were going to start making our first second Kodu Game Lab game now (we’re not), what would you make? Think of an idea for a Kodu Game Lab game, record your idea in your manual.

  37. Activity 3.2: Game Ideas

  38. Activity 3.3: School Case Studies • Yarra Road Primary School • Grade 5 and 2 students working together in pairs • Cyber safety theme • Requirement to include a maze

  39. Activity 3.3: School Case Studies • Laurimar Primary School • Worked in pairs • Provided assessment criteria

  40. Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Eltham Primary School

  41. Activity 3.3: School Case Studies Elsternwick Primary School

  42. Module 3: Recap We have covered: • We have started thinking about the games we may make. • We have learnt how some schools have used Kodu Game Lab • We have

  43. Module 4

  44. Activity 4.1: Designing Games

  45. Activity 4.2: Game Design Patterns • A way to describe design choices that reoccur in many games • An explanation to why these design choices have been made • A guide of how to make similar design choices in your own game project • What is required to make the pattern emerge • What consequences can the pattern have on game play?

  46. Activity 4.2: Game Design Patterns Name Problem Solution Consequences

  47. Activity 4.2: Kodu Game Lab Recipes Code Recipes Are language specific solutions to common coding problems.