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Eating Strategies for High Energy: The Secret’s out!. Tanya Williams, MS, RD, LDN Spring 2007. Topics of Discussion. Good nutrition promotes high energy levels. High energy levels begin with breakfast. Meals to fight stress & fatigue. Snacks for cravings & pre-exercise energy.

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eating strategies for high energy the secret s out

Eating Strategies for High Energy:The Secret’s out!

Tanya Williams, MS, RD, LDN

Spring 2007

topics of discussion
Topics of Discussion
  • Good nutrition promotes high energy levels.
  • High energy levels begin with breakfast.
  • Meals to fight stress & fatigue.
  • Snacks for cravings & pre-exercise energy.
  • Fueling during & after exercise.
  • Hydration for energy.
a plan for good nutrition the energy basics
A Plan for Good Nutrition:The Energy Basics
  • The key to more energy…prevent yourself from getting too hungry.*
    • Maintains appropriate BS levels.
      • Maintains energy levels
    • Decreases chance of choosing “junky” foods & feeling the “sugar low.”
      • High fat & sugar
      • High Kcals
    • Increases chance of choosing “healthy” foods.
      • Supports healthy lifestyle
      • Maintains weight

*Eat every 3 to 4 hours

a plan for good nutrition the energy basics1
A Plan for Good Nutrition:The Energy Basics
  • Variety
    • More types of food eaten, the more nutrients consumed.
  • Wholesomeness
    • Choose whole or lightly

processed foods.

  • Moderation
    • Don’t think about food being “good” or “bad, ” any food can work into a healthy diet plan.
a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Whole Grains & Starches
    • 55 to 65% of total kcals/day
    • 6 to 11 servings/day
  • Top Choices
    • Whole grain cereals
    • Oatmeal
    • Bagels & high-fiber Muffins
    • Whole-grain & dark breads
    • Stone-wheat & whole-grain crackers
    • Popcorn
a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods1
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Fruits
    • 2 to 4 servings/day
  • Top Choices
    • Citrus fruits & Juices
    • Bananas
    • Cantaloupe
    • Kiwi
    • Strawberries & Berries
    • Dried Fruit
a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods2
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Vegetables
    • 3 to 5 servings/day
  • Top Choices
    • Broccoli
    • Spinach
    • Peppers (green, red, or yellow)
    • Tomatoes & Tomato Sauce
    • Cruciferous vegetables (i.e., Brussel sprouts, kale, or cabbage)
the nutrition rainbow
The Nutrition Rainbow

* Tomatoes are technically a fruit.

a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods3
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Protein–Rich Foods
    • 25 to 30% of total kcals/day
    • 2 to 3 servings/day
  • Top Choices
    • Chicken & Turkey
    • Fish
    • Lean Beef & Pork
    • Peanut Butter
    • Canned Beans
    • Soy foods (Tofu)
a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods4
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Low-fat Dairy
    • 3 servings/day
    • 4 servings/day if under the age of 24 years
  • Top Choices
    • Milk, non-fat or low-fat
    • Yogurt, non-fat or low-fat
    • Cheese, non-fat or low-fat
    • Cottage Cheese
a plan for good nutrition nutrient dense foods5
A Plan for Good Nutrition:Nutrient Dense Foods
  • Fats, Oils, & Sweets
    • 20-35% total kcals/day from fats & oils
    • 10% total kcals/day from sugar
  • Top Choices
    • Olive oil
    • Walnuts
    • Molasses
    • Berry-based Jams
breakfast energy
Breakfast & Energy
  • A car works far better with gas in its tank, so too will your body if you give it adequate fuel in the morning!
  • Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.
breakfast energy1
Breakfast & Energy
  • Of all the nutrition mistakes to be made, skipping breakfast is by far the worst!
    • Low energy.
    • Increased craving for sweets.
    • Increased intake of cookies & treats.
    • Weight gain.
    • Increased irritableness or short-temperedness
    • Decreased efficiency in work & play.
the non breakfast eater familiar breakfast excuses
The Non-Breakfast Eater: Familiar Breakfast Excuses
  • “ I don’t have time.”
  • “I’m not hungry in the morning.”
  • “I don’t like breakfast foods.”
  • “I’m on a diet.”
solution for the excuses i don t have time
Solution for the Excuses“I don’t have time.”
  • Pack it the night before &

eat on the go.

    • Yogurt & Cereal
    • Large Banana & Milk
    • Homemade Smoothie
    • Raisins & Peanuts
    • Bran Muffin & jam
    • Bagel, PB & J, & Milk
    • Graham Crackers & Milk
    • Pita bread stuffed with cottage cheese, turkey, hummus, or PB & J.
solution for the excuses i m not hungry in the morning
Solution for the Excuses“I’m not hungry in the morning.”
  • Not hungry for breakfast?
    • Chances are you ate too many kcals the night before!
      • Late night snacks can curb a morning appetite, lead to weight gain, and an inadequate diet. BEWARE!
    • Morning workouts kill your appetite.
      • Eat brunch
      • Pack out good, wholesome foods like fruit, bagels, cereal, or high-fiber muffins to eat when your hunger returns.
solution for the excuses i don t like breakfast foods
Solution for the Excuses“I don’t like breakfast foods.”
  • Who said you had to eat “breakfast foods for breakfast?”
  • 1/3 of your kcals for the day should come from a morning meal.
    • Dinner leftovers
    • Baked potato w/cottage cheese
    • Sandwiches
    • Soup & Crackers
    • Chinese food
    • Pizza
    • Special Holiday food
solution for the excuses i m on a diet
Solution for the Excuses“I’m on a diet.”
  • Studies prove that eating Breakfast is one of the best ways to lose & maintain weight.
  • Goal is about 500 kcals
    • Med. bagel & vanilla yogurt
    • 2 pieces of cheese pizza
    • 2 pkts. instant oatmeal, sm. box of raisins, & ½ c. powdered milk
lunch time
Lunch Time
  • Meals should be ~ 500 kcals.
  • Meals should include 3 out of the 5 food groups.
    • Bagel, yogurt, & banana
    • Salad, turkey, & pita.
  • Consider Peanut butter.
    • Power-packed food
    • Helps w/sweet cravings
  • Pack Leftovers.
  • Eat Dinner at Lunch.
lunch
Lunch
  • Create a “Super Salad”to boost your intake of nutrients and energy.
    • Step 1: Boost CHO intake.
      • Corn or peas, beans, rice or pasta,

& fruit.

    • Step 2: Remember your rainbow.
      • Vit A & C, K+, Fe, & fiber
    • Step 3: Include protein.
      • Cottage cheese, tuna, turkey, eggs, or beef.
    • Step 4: Remember calcium.
      • Drink milk, add tofu or yogurt.
dinner
Dinner
  • For more energy, begin by focusing less on dinner and more on breakfast & lunch.
    • “Consider Dinner for Breakfast and Breakfast for Dinner!”
  • Do not arrive home hungry.
  • Plan time to shop for food when you are not stressed, tired, or hungry.
  • Plan cook-a-thons.
dinner1
Dinner
  • Dinner should NOT be the largest meal of the day.
  • Focus on creating a meal of ~500 to 650 kcals (60% of the kcals coming from CHOs).
  • Choose 3 out of the 5 food groups to create a meal.
  • Build your meal around CHOs.
  • Example:
    • 8 stone-wheat crackers, ½ can tuna w/1 tsp lite mayo, 12-oz can V-8 juice, & 1 cup fruited yogurt.*

Note: sample meal based on 1800-2000 kcal meal plan for an active woman, can adjust portions for an active man.

the truth about snacking
The Truth About Snacking
  • Some people “try not” to snack between meals b/c they think it’s sinful & fattening.
  • The truth is…snacking is important.
    • Hunger occurs every 3-4 Hours, snacking helps to curb the appetite so that “binging behavior” can be avoided.
    • Provides energy to fuel workouts or normal daily activities.
snack attacks snacking guidelines 101
Snack Attacks“Snacking Guidelines 101”
  • Snacks are needed, just remember if you’re too hungry you may not care what you put into your mouth!
  • A sugary treat can fit into a well-balanced diet.
  • If you desire “sweets,” determine if you have eaten enough kcals at meal times.
  • Prevent sweet cravings by eating more kcals at breakfast & lunch.
  • If eating a late dinner, plan to eat a mid-afternoon (pm) snack.
high energy snacks the concept of mini meals
High Energy Snacks:“The concept of mini-meals”
  • Mini-meals include at least 2 foods from at least 2 food groups.
    • GOAL: Wholesome, Nutritious, & Convenient
  • Examples:
    • Bagel w/PB
    • Granola, banana, & milk
    • Instant oatmeal w/milk
    • Dry cereal w/milk or dried fruit
    • PB & J sandwich
    • Fruit & Yogurt
    • Smoothies
pre exercise snacking guidelines
Pre-Exercise Snacking Guidelines
  • ~1 Hour before exercise choose a CHO-based mini-meal.
    • ≥ 60 to 90 minutes choose foods with a moderate to low glycemic index (i.e., oatmeal, bananas, or lentils).
    • ≤ 60 minutes choose the “tried and true” foods that digest easily (i.e., bread, bagels, or pasta).
  • Limit high-fat protein foods.
  • Be very cautious with sugary foods (high GI foods).
  • Allow adequate time for digestion.
  • Drink your fluids.
fueling during exercise
Fueling During Exercise
  • Exercise lasting ≥ 60 to 90 minutes/session.
    • ~100 to 250 kcals (30 to 60 gm CHO) per hour after the 1st hour of endurance exercise.
    • Examples include:
      • 4, 8 oz. glasses of sports drink
      • 2 cups sport drink & banana
      • 2 cups sports drink, energy bar, & extra water.
      • Also; fruit juices, sports gels, or hard candy can be consumed.
fueling after exercise the recovery phase
Fueling After Exercise“The Recovery Phase”
  • Exercise lasting ≥ 60 to 90 minutes.
  • The plan:
    • Replace fluids first.
      • Juices, watery fruits, high-CHO sport drinks, or water.
    • Replace CHOs.
      • Consume ~0.5 gm CHO/lb BWT every H for 4-5 hours

(begin repleting immediately ~15 minutes post-exercise).

      • OJ & med. bagel, 16 oz. cranberry juice, or

12-oz. soda & 8-oz fruited yogurt.

    • Replace protein.
      • Consume ~6 gms of protein (about 1 egg) within 30 minutes after a workout.
      • Consume with a CHO source (i.e., turkey sandwich or cereal & milk).
    • Replace electrolytes (Potassium & Sodium).
      • Potassium (~1 lb. sweat = 80-100 mg): OJ, bananas, raisins, or yogurt.
      • Sodium (~1 lb. sweat = 400-700 mg): Pretzels, pizza, Gatorade, or soup.
hydration energy
Hydration & Energy

Water is the most important nutrient.

  • Being dehydrated can lead to early fatigue.
  • Exercising when you are dehydrated is dangerous and hurts your performance.
  • Good hydration protects against cramping and heat illness.

• Train yourself to drink before, during,

& after exercise.

fluid regime
Fluid Regime
  • Drink 2 cups of fluids 2 hours before exercise.
  • When you are training, keep a fluid bottle next to you and drink 5 to 10 ounces every 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Weigh yourself before and after exercise to determine how much weight you lost to sweat.
  • Drink about 3 cups of fluid for every pound lost.
  • Keep a record of how much fluid you drink.
sports drinks
Sports Drinks
  • Drink sport drinks when
    • when exercising for more than 1 hour
    • when it is hot or humid
    • whenever you have a high-intensity workout
  • Sport drinks* should contain:
    • 14 to 19 grams of CHO
    • 110 to 165 milligrams of sodium per 8 ounces
conclusions
Conclusions
  • Food is fuel for your body.
  • You are what you eat.
    • If you eat junk, you will feel “junky.”
  • “Energy” comes from good food choices, proper hydration, and adequate rest.
  • No energy pill, potion, or bar will fuel your body as efficiently or effectively as “real” food.
references
References
  • Clark, Nancy. The Athlete’s Kitchen: How to eat and win. New York: Bantam Books, 1981.
  • Clark, Nancy. Sports Nutrition Guidebook, 3rd ed. Champaign Illinois: Human Kinetics, 2003.
  • Dunford, Marie, editor. Sports Nutrition: A practice manual for professionals, 4th ed. Chicago, Illinois: American Dietetic Association, 2006.
  • Mahan, LK and Escott-Stump S. Krause’s Food 10th Edition, Nutrition, and Diet Therapy. New York: W.B Saunders Company, 2000.
  • Sports Nutrition Workshop: Nutrition & Exercise Conference, Philadelphia, PA 2006.
  • Stephenson, Jane and Bader, Diane. Health Cheques™: Sports Nutrition Guide. Mankato, Mn: Appletree Press, 2005.
need help
Need Help?

Tanya Williams, MS, RD, LDN

Clinical Nutritionist

Room 202 SHS

577-1401 (SHS desk)

577-3987 (office)

tlm019@bucknell.edu

Hours available Monday-Friday

(by appointment only)