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Effective Team Problem Solving with Data

Effective Team Problem Solving with Data

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Effective Team Problem Solving with Data

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  1. Effective Team Problem Solving with Data Adapted from the TIPS training materials developed by Horner & Todd, University of Oregon

  2. What is TIPS and Why Use It? TIPS is a formal and predictable process used to build and implement effective, data-based solutions. It consists of two parts: Meeting Foundations—the structure of the meeting, including how a team prepares for and conducts meetings Problem Solving Model—the step-by-step process of developing a plan of action based on data • Effective problem solving meetings are key to developing and sustaining an effective Child Study System—3 tiered model for prevention and intervention.

  3. When Can TIPS be Used? Useful for many types of campus based meetings: • Child Study Team (CST) Meetings • Positive Behavior Support (PBS) Meetings • Data meetings (ex. determining students in need of Tier II supports) • Campus Leadership Meetings • Cabinet Meetings

  4. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  5. Goals for Today • Understand basic meeting foundations • Understand TIPS problem solving model • Leave ready to implement TIPS at your next meeting

  6. Research Based • Basic steps for data-based problem solving remain consistent across time, context, and authors • A 2011 research study published in Journal of Applied School Psychology found that schools receiving training and follow-up coaching of TIPS model significantly improved their meeting effectiveness

  7. Meeting Foundations Provides a basis for efficiency and effectiveness of campus-based conversations

  8. Meeting Foundation Elements • Primary and backup up roles are assigned (facilitator, minute taker, data analyst) with defined responsibilities • Meeting participants have the authority to develop and implement problem-solving solutions • Meetings start and end on time • Team members attend meetings promptly and regularly

  9. Meeting Foundation Elements • Agenda is visible during meeting and used to define topics and guide discussion during meetings (consider projecting agenda) • Previous meeting minutes are reviewed at the start of each meeting (format will vary) • Next meeting is scheduled by the conclusion of each meeting • Meeting minutes are distributed to all team members within 24 hours of the conclusion of each meeting

  10. Define Roles for Effective Meetings Core roles • Facilitator—maintains pace and focus, ensures adherence to agenda • Minute taker—records meeting discussion and decisions; reviewsprevious meeting minutes • Data analyst—ensures access to appropriate data, helps interpret data for meaning and relevance • Active team member • Administrator Identify backup for each role Can one person serve multiple roles? Are other roles needed?

  11. Meeting Agenda Start up • Roles for meeting • Review previous minutes with status update • Briefly review current meeting agenda General Information/Issues Problem Solving • Review data to prompt problem statement • Develop goal with comprehensive action plan Wrap up • Brief team assessment of meeting • Determine follow-up needed for next meeting and who is responsible

  12. Important Structural Components • Regular meetings with regular attendance • The right people • The right roles • facilitator • minute taker • data analyst • active team members • Meaningful meeting minutes • record of general issues/tasks with decisions made • record of problem-solving plans for specific issues with decisions made

  13. Team Meeting Minutes and Problem-Solving Action Plan Form Today’s Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker: Data Analyst: Next Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker: Data Analyst: Team Members (bold are present today) Administrative/General Information and Issues Problem-Solving Action Plan Evaluation of Team Meeting (Mark your ratings with an “X”)

  14. TIPS Problem Solving Model

  15. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  16. Big Ideas for Effective Problem Solving Teams use a predictable routine • Meeting foundations • Consistent use of data • Regularly scheduled reporting cycle(s) Problem Solving model is generalized • Across contexts/teams (campus, group, individual) • Across content areas (academic, attendance, behavior) Problems are defined with precision before solving Implementation and outcomes are measured regularly • To determine progress • To determine goal completion

  17. Define problem with precision Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model My Reporting ACCESS Collect Data & Transform Into Information Measure fidelity and impact; revise eCST AimsWeb Student Level Review Schoolnet Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  18. Collect Data and Transform into Information Collect data AISD uses many different data sources (School-net, eCST, Access, Deeds, etc.) Teams may need to use multiple sources. Using data, develop a general statement of the problem • Examine the patterns (tell the story) • Levels, trends, peaks • Examine data related to current perceptions • Compare your data with previous years and with what staff, students, and families want

  19. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  20. Define Problems With Precision Start with a general statement of the problem. Look at the big picture and use data to refine and describe. Create a precise statement.

  21. Use Data to Refine and Describe When? What? Use data that helps answers these questions in order to move from general to precise statements. Where? Why? Who? Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

  22. Examples: Primary to Precise Gang-like behavior is increasing • playground bullying • recess • four 4th grade boys • Attention Carly is having reading difficulties • 20 wpm • Should be 60 wpm • Skips, guesses • Language arts • R-controlled vowels, digraphs, long vowels Bullying (verbal and physical aggression) on the playground is increasing during first recess, is being done mostly by four 4th grade boys, and seems to be reinforced by peer attention. Carly is reading 20 wcpm (goal is 60), skips or guesses at words she doesn’t know, mostly during language arts Carly can not decode and struggles to read words containing R controlled vowels, digraphs, and long vowels

  23. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  24. Identifying Goals Percentage reduced or achieved: • Reduce cafeteria disruptions by 75% and maintain throughout year • Achieve weekly attendance rate of 97% and maintain throughout year. Absolute reduction: • Reduce cafeteria disruptions to an average of no more than 2 per month and maintain throughout year. • Reduce word call errors to no more than 2 per passage when reading grade level paragraphs. Scale/satisfaction level: • Demonstrate appropriate cafeteria behavior by scoring “acceptable” or better (4 on a 5-point scale) on bi-weekly checks completed by staff on duty. • Demonstrate acceptable writing skills by scoring at least a 2 on a 4 point rubric on weekly writing assessments.

  25. Progress Monitoring Determine how progress will be measured at the time the goal is written. Two ways to document: • Write measurement method directly into the goal— … by scoring at least 2 on a 4 point rubric … by regularly achieving at least 60 wpm on oral reading fluency checks • If using eCST, document measurement method using the drop-down fields (assessment score, percentage, rubric or scale, etc.)

  26. Sample Goals Campus Goals Behavior: Reduce serious cafeteria disruptions to no more than 2 per month and maintain. Attendance: Achieve weekly attendance rate of 97% and maintain. Disproportionality: Reduce number of discretionary removals by 25% as recorded in DEEDS. Individual Goals Academic: Reduce word call errors to no more than 2 when reading grade level paragraphs. Behavior: Refrain from classroom disruptions as measured by scoring at least 7 of 10 on daily point sheet. See the webinar on writing effective goals in eCST for more information.

  27. Goal Writing Practice Bullying (verbal and physical aggression) on the playground is increasing during first recess, is being done mostly by four 4th grade boys, and seems to be reinforced by peer attention. Carly is reading 20 wcpm (goal is 60), skips or guesses at words she doesn’t know, mostly during language arts. Carly can not decode and struggles to read words containing R controlled vowels, digraphs, and long vowels Verbal and/or physical aggression during fourth grade recess will be reduced to an average of no more than 1 instance per week. Carly will consistently read at least 35 words correct per minute when reading a grade level passage.

  28. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  29. Hypothesis Drives the Solution Hypothesis • The best explanation for what data and experience tell you • Provides a possible “why” for other Ws you discovered (for behavioral challenges, this is often referred to as the “function” of the behavior) • Guides you toward possible solutions Think of the hypothesis and solution as paired

  30. Build Solutions & Action Plan • Brainstorm all ideas for addressing the problem. Think specifically of ways to: • Prevent problems from occurring • Teach new skills or behaviors • Reinforce new skills or behaviors • Determine which ideas you will implement now: • Choose solutions that best fit the context and the problem • Choose the least number of things to do that will support meeting the expected goals • Document how the solution/intervention will be carried out.

  31. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  32. Measure Fidelity—Establish Checks Fidelity—Did we implement our plan? Was the length and duration of implementation adequate? Example: Use a 1-5 scale for all questions; no more than 3 questions/week • At staff meeting, use fist of five to register score • In staff room, create number line poster with questions and stickers Did you stand in hallway during passing periods? 2 3 4 5 No Yes Did you stand in hallway during passing periods? 2 3 4 5 No Yes Did you greet 5 students not in your class each day? 2 3 4 5 No Yes

  33. Measure Impact—Review Data • Did the plan/intervention produce the desired outcomes? • What data supports this determination? • Has the goal been met? • Should interventions continue, be modified, or stop? • Are there any parts of the plan that should become permanent?

  34. Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Define problem with precision Measure fidelity and impact; revise Identify goal and how to monitor Collect Data & Transform Into Information Build solutions and create action plan Meeting Foundations

  35. Activity Choose one case study from the handout • Elementary—individual academic concern • Secondary—school-wide attendance concern With a partner or small group, work through each step of the problem solving model.

  36. Six Things to Avoid • Moving to solution before defining the problem • Building solutions from broadly defined or fuzzy problem statements • Failing to use data to define/confirm problem • Agreeing on a solution without creating a plan for how to implement and evaluate • Agreeing on a solution and never assessing progress or outcomes • Engaging in serial problem solving without decisions

  37. Monitoring the TIPS Process At the end of each meeting, consider completing a short meeting evaluation. • Document responses on meeting minute form • Make adjustments as needed At the beginning, middle, and end of year, consider completing the Team Fidelity of Implementation Checklist (CSSF is available to assist upon request). • Create action plans for items marked “not implemented” or “in progress” • Document plan on meeting minutes form

  38. Facilitator Support To support your TIPS process, CSSFs are available to: • Observe meetings and provide feedback • Provide TIPS training to campus groups • Complete the TIPS Fidelity Checklist periodically • Provide assistance establishing meeting foundations • Offer coaching on the use of TIPS model during meetings For more information please see our website at: www.childstudysystem.com

  39. Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

  40. Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.