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TIPS: Team Initiated Problem Solving

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  1. TIPS: Team Initiated Problem Solving Review Status and Identify Problems Collect and Use Data Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Develop and Refine Hypotheses Anne Todd, University of Oregon Celeste Rossetto Dickey, University of Oregon Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  2. Acknowledgements • Steve Newton, Anne Todd, Kate Algozzine, Rob Horner & Bob Algozzine • University of North Carolina • University of Oregon

  3. Today’s Goals • Overview of TIPS • Learn elements of Meeting Foundations • Build roles for team • Meeting Foundations Checklist • Electronic meeting minutes • Understand the Problem Solving Model • Data-based Decision-making rules • Defining “problems” with precision • Building practical solutions • Data Management System: ISIS-SWIS • Questions

  4. Journal of Applied School Psychology TIPS Study: Todd et al., 2011 Baseline Coaching TIPS Meeting Foundations Score School A Solid = SW PBIS meetings Open = progress monitoring (DIBELS) meetings School B % DORA Foundations Score School C School D

  5. Journal of Applied School Psychology TIPS Study: Todd et al., 2011 Thoroughness of decision-making scores Baseline Coaching TIPS School A Solid = SW PBIS meetings Open = progress monitoring (DIBELS) meetings % DORA Thoroughness Score School C School D

  6. What do we need? • A clear model with steps for problem solving • Access to the right information at the right time in the right format • A formal process that a group of people can use to build and implement solutions.

  7. Hold effective meetings that use data to problem solve and plan AND that result in positive student outcomes Building Capacity and Sustainability For Social Competence, Academic Achievement, and Safety OUTCOMES Team-based, documentation, regular communication cycles SWIS DIBELS Aims Web Easy CBM SYSTEMS INFORMATION Meeting Foundations Meeting Minute Format Problem solving routine PRACTICES Supporting Staff & Student Behavior and Decision Making

  8. Improving Decision-Making via Problem Solving Action Planning & Evaluation Problem Solving Problem Solution Information/ Data

  9. TIPS Model • TIPS Training • One full day team training • Two coached meetings • Team Meeting • Use of electronic meeting minute system • Formal roles (facilitator, recorder, data analyst) • Specific expectations (before meeting, during meeting, after meeting) • Access and use of data • Projected meeting minutes

  10. TIPS: Team Initiated Problem SolvingRunning Efficient Meetings Review Status and Identify Problems Collect and Use Data Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Develop and Refine Hypotheses Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Meeting Foundations

  11. Problem-Solving Meeting Foundations Structure of meetings lays foundation for efficiency & effectiveness

  12. Meeting Foundations Elements • Purpose of the team • Define team agreements about meeting processes • Define roles & responsibilities • Use electronic meeting minutes Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  13. What makes a successful meeting? • Start & end on time • 75% of team members present & engaged in topic(s) • Agenda is used to guide meeting topics • System is used for monitoring progress of implemented solutions (review previous meeting minutes) • System is used for documenting decisions • Facilitator, Minute Taker & Data Analyst come prepared for meeting & complete during the meeting responsibilities • Next meeting is scheduled • All regular team members (absent or present) get access to the meeting minutes w/n 24 hours of the meeting • Decision makers are present when needed • Efforts are making a difference in the lives of children/students.

  14. Defining Team Membership and Meeting Schedule Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  15. PBIS School Team Members Roles & Responsibilities • Meeting Facilitator: Facilitates Each team meeting, bringing an agreed upon agenda. At meeting’s end, checks for understanding, clarifies any tasks to be completed before next meeting, and notes next meeting date. • Recorder: • Brings a laptop(could use a template for minutes) to record only the decisions and actions. Distributes electronic copies of the minutes to team members. • Data Analyst: Provides a summary analysis of the data reports for team members to use for building responses at the meeting: The BIG 5 Reports (Average Referrals per day per month, Problem Behavior, Location, Time, Student Referrals) and Motivation Custom Report. (Becomes fluent in report features for data analysis). • Staff Sharing Coordinator(s) Organizes the information (data summary and suggested responses to data) to share at monthly staff meeting. Schedules and rotates 2-3 team members to present to staff each month. • Action Plan and Calendar Monitor(s): Tracks the PBIS Team Year Action Plan at each meeting and all PBIS Calendar dates(meetings, trainings, re-teaching schedule, etc.)

  16. Define roles for effective meetings • Core roles • Facilitator • Minute taker • Data analyst • Staff Sharing Coordinator • Action Plan & Calendar Monitor • Administrator • Backup for each role Typically NOT the administrator Can one person serve multiple roles? Are there other roles needed? Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  17. Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  18. Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  19. Before the Meeting…Who does each Facilitator • Room reserved • “New” items solicited for agenda • Agenda produced • Review data & bring report to the team • Lead team through discussion of effects of in-process solutions on “old” problems • Meeting minutes distributed within 24 hours of meeting. • Computer reserved; access to SWIS online database assured • LCD projector reserved & set up to project data (or team has some other strategy for ensuring team members can review data at meeting) Facilitator Facilitator Data Analyst Facilitator Minute Taker Minute Taker Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  20. At Close of and After Meeting… • Meeting Minutes and Problem-Solving Action Plan completed • Coordinate the staff meeting presentation • Copy of Meeting Minutes & Problem-Solving Action Plan distributed to each member within 24 hrs. • Update the PBIS Team Calendar and Action Planning Forms Minute Taker Staff Sharing Coord. Minute Taker Action Plan & Calendar Monitor Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  21. Team Roles

  22. Using Meeting Minutes • Documentation of • Logistics of meeting • Agenda items for today’s meeting ( and next meeting) • Discussion items, decisions made, tasks and timelines assigned • Problem statements, solutions/decisions/tasks • Reviewing Meeting minutes • A snapshot of what happened at the previous meeting and what needs to be reviewed during the upcoming meeting • Visual tracking of focus topics during and after meetings • Prevents side conversations • Prevents repetition • Encourages completion of tasks Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  23. Langley Elementary PBIS Team Meeting Minutes and Problem-Solving Action Plan Form Today’s Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker: Data Analyst: Next Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker: Data Analyst: Team Members (bold are present today) Administrative/General Information and Issues Problem-Solving Action Plan Evaluation of Team Meeting (Mark your ratings with an “X”) Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  24. What needs to be documented? • Meeting demographics • Date, time, who is present, who is absent • Agenda • Next meeting date/time/location/roles • Administrative/ general Information/Planning items • Topic of discussion, decisions made, who will do what, by when • Problem-Solving items • Problem statement, data used for problem solving, determined solutions, who will do what by when, goal, how/how often will progress toward goal be measured, how/how often will fidelity of implementation be measured

  25. Administrative/General Information and Issues

  26. Problem-Solving Action Plan • Enter this information into the Problem Solving Action Plan section in the Meeting Minutes

  27. Meetings Foundation Checklist

  28. Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010

  29. TIPS Worksheet Meeting Foundation Checklists Meeting Minutes & Action Plan Form George Swis

  30. Identify Problems Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations

  31. Identify Problems Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan SWIS AimsWeb Collect and Use Data OAKS DIBELS easyCBM Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  32. Generalize-able Application of Problem Solving School wide Grade level Groups of students Individual Students Academic and Social Behavior

  33. Elementary School with 150 Students Our average Major ODRs per school day per month are higher than national median for a school of our enrollment size. We have peaks in frequency of problems in Nov, Feb & April, with an increasing trend from August to May.

  34. DIBELS Universal Screening Our DIBELS Distribution summary shows that 49% of our kindergarten students at Adams Elementary fall in the strategic and intensive range. We have over 50% of our students requiring strategic and intensive supports for ISF, LNF.

  35. More Precision Is Required to Solve the Identified Problem • Define problem by identifying What problem behaviors/errors are involved • Clarify problem by identifying • When problems/errors are occurring • Where problems/errors are occurring • Why problems/errors are occurring Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual.

  36. What When Where Why Who Designing Effective Behavior Support

  37. Examples: Primary to Precise • Gang-like behavior is increasing • Texting during school is becoming more negative • Bullying (verbal and physical aggression) on the playground is increasing during “first recess,” is being done mostly by four 4th grade boys, and seems to be maintained by social praise from the bystander peer group. • A large number of students in each grade level (6, 7, 8) are using texting to spread rumors, and harass peers. Texting occurs both during the school day, and after school, and appears to be maintained by attention from others.

  38. What When Where Why Who Designing Effective Behavior Support

  39. Defining problems with precision for individual students • For individual students precision elements include: • What • Does student have discrimination skills? • Does student have motor skills? • Where • When • Why • Does student know when to use the skill? • Is student motivated to use the skill? • Is student experiencing a combination of the above?

  40. Examples: Primary to Precise • Carly is having reading difficulties • Jack is having lots of trouble at home • Carly is reading 20 cwpm (goal is 60), skips or guesses at words she doesn’t know, mostly during language arts • Jack screams and cries at home, daily, when asked to get in car, do homework, and get ready for bed. He does not like riding in the car and does not like doing school work at home.

  41. Cost Benefits of Problem Solving with Precise Problem Statements An Example Elementary Playground Problems

  42. Elementary School (Title 1) • Total enrollment= 550 • 3 classes per grade level • 18 classrooms (30/class) • Primary Problem Statement • fighting and physical aggression on playground • 550 students full playground area, expectations, equipment use • Precise Problem Statement • High rates of physical aggression, disrespect and inappropriate language on the playground during second and third grade recess. Many students are involved and it appears they are trying to get access to equipment/games • 180 2ne/3rd graders, routine for accessing/sharing equipment/games

  43. Savings in Planning & Implementation TimeMoving from Primary Problem Statements to Precision Problem Statement hours

  44. Identify Problems Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Develop Hypothesis Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Collect and Use Data Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Problem SolvingMeeting Foundations

  45. Using Data to Build Solutions • Prevention: How can we avoid the problem context? • Who, When, Where • Schedule change, curriculum change, etc • Teaching: How can we define, teach, and monitor what we want? • Teach appropriate behavior • Use problem behavior as negative example • Recognition: How can we build in systematic reward for desired behavior? • Extinction: How can we prevent problem behavior from being rewarded? • Consequences: What are efficient, consistent consequences for problem behavior? • How will we collect and use data to evaluate (a) implementation fidelity, and (b) impact on student outcomes?

  46. Focus on prevention first. How could we reduce the situations that lead to these behaviors? • How do we ensure that students know what they SHOULD be doing when these situations arise? • How do we ensure that appropriate behavior is recognized? • How do we work to ensure that problem behavior is NOT being rewarded. • Are corrective consequences needed? • How will we know (a) if we are doing what we plan, and (b) if what we plan is working to benefit students? Solution Development

  47. Hannah • Fourth grade female in local elem. school • Diagnosis of Down Syndrome • Receives specially designed instruction for all areas • Participates in 4th grade activities daily & weekly • Problem behaviors • to get peer/adult attention • to escape task demands • Primary problem statement • Hannah is disruptive and non compliant

  48. Hannah’s Precise Problem Statement Given demands related to transitions and instructional situations, Hannah engages in problem behaviors including slumped posture in chair, covering mouth with hand when speaking, mumbling, talking too softly to be heard, pushing away from the desk or materials, hiding head/face on desk and forgetting materials (homework folder, pencil, worksheet) in order to escape task and instructional demands. About one of every three instructional sessions occur without incident.

  49. Social-Organizational Goals(Respect & Responsibility) • Hannah will demonstrate on-task behavior. • complete assigned work. • use a clear, audible voice when speaking. • follow directions. • transition from one activity to the next throughout the school day. • be prepared for instruction by having materials and being on time. • 80% of time across all contexts by the end of Winter Quarter, as measured daily. • Hannah’s Self management form IS the data collection form.

  50. Academic Goals • Hannah will • Copy schedule words & days of week • Write the date in two formats • Read digital time • Read analog time • Match digital and analog • Add single digit numbers • 80% of time by the end of Winter Quarter, as measured daily