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China’s English language policy for primary schools. School A and B Presented by Hazhar Abdalla. The structure. Introduction Methodology School A past future School B past future School C past future School D past future Discussion Conclusion.

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china s english language policy for primary schools
China’s English language policy for primary schools

School A and B

Presented by Hazhar Abdalla

the structure
The structure
  • Introduction
  • Methodology
  • School A
      • past
      • future
  • School B
      • past
      • future
  • School C
      • past
      • future
  • School D
      • past
      • future
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
school a

School A is a top primary school in an urban district, consisting of students from diverse family backgrounds. The average class size is 40-50 students

  • past

In fall 1999 it started offering English classes prior to release of the policy to fourth and fifth graders.

School A

In fall 2001 it upgraded its English programme: three full time teachers taught English to 4,5 and 6 graders. Three times per week for 40 minutes per period.

school a1

2004-2005 school year

Students in grades 3-6 are learning English having three 35 minute classes per week.

English teachers.

School A

Since 2000 school A has been recruiting one English teacher every year.

place of english in the curriculum
Place of English in the curriculum

In Ta1’s opinion, the quality of ELT cannot be improved unless students have at least one English class every day and teachers teach fewer students.

Ta4 says that students should have exposure ( experience ) to it every day.

english language learning environment
English language learning environment

In School A, bilingual signs can be seen mainly in the following areas:

1-in restrooms

2-in the stair areas

3-in hallways

slide9

节约用水

  • Save water
slide10

靠右

Upstairs downstairs

  • 楼上的照片 楼下
slide12

School A’ radio station broadcasts English song such as ‘‘ Ten Little Indians’’ twice a day during breaks.

slide13

School A invites native speakers to attendextracurricular activities, to enhance students’ interests in learning English.

parents attitudes towards english
Parents’ attitudes towards English.

Both ( Pa ) and (Ta1) stated that parents take an interest in their children’s English education and support their children learn English in the following ways:-

a- purchasing English language materials

b-enrolling their children in after school English

programs and

c- hiring a tutor

slide15

Ta4 thinks that there are basically three types:

a-some parents are well educated, they are very

supportive and do well.

b- some parents, though they do not know English,

they ask their kids to teach them.

c-some parents do poorly, even they do not know their kids are learning English

Ta3’s opinion, most parents are aware of the importance of English, but they do not necessarily help their children learn English; instead they expect teachers to take full responsibility.

slide17

Challenges.

According to Pa School A is faced with two major challenges as far as ELT is concerned.

  • First , Pa thinks that it is challenging to help students consolidate what they have learned in class.
  • Second, School A is facing pressure from counterpart schools which have introduced English to first graders and are accordingly perceived as better schools in terms of ELT
slide18

Future

Pa announced in a staff meeting her intention to lower the starting age to the first grade in the near future, but she is uncertain whether lowering the starting age is an effective way to promote ELT.

On the other hand she is concerned that first graders may get confused between Chinese Pinyin and English alphabet when learning both languages at the same time.

slide19

School B

  • Past

School B was one of 14 schools in county Z scheduled to implement the policy in fall 2001.

According to (Pb) school B did not receive additional guidance from the Education commission of County Z to initiate the implementation of the policy.

School B managed to recruit one temporary teacher and two permanent ones and teach to third and fourth graders three times per week for 40 minutes per period in fall 2001.

slide20

School B

2004-5 school year

School B was one of 14 schools in county Z scheduled to implement the policy in fall 2001.

According to (Pb) school B did not receive additional guidance from the Education commission of County Z to initiate the implementation of the policy. School B managed to recruit one temporary teacher and two permanent ones and teach to third and fourth graders three times per week for 40 minutes per period in fall 2001.

slide21

School B

English teachers

slide22

School B

Goal for ELT

According to Pb ,school B has not yet articulated a general goal for ELT; a general guideline for English teacher is to follow textbooks.

slide23

School B

  • Place of English in the curriculum.

Pb said that School B treats English as a key subject, whereas English teachers disagree with him.

slide24

School B

  • English language learning environment.

Bilingual door signs are used in school B for classroom, restroom , teacher’s office. e.g.

‘‘Phonic Room’’

实验室房间

Don’t push

不要推

slide25

School B

Keep clean, please

请保持清洁

Don’t waste water

不要浪费水实

slide26

Parent attitudes towards English.

Pb said ‘‘ parents have a favourable attitude toward English. But they are not so interested in it. Parents have difficulty in helping their children with English.

slide27

Parent attitudes towards English.

Tb2 said that a large proportion of parents do not know English.

In Tb4’s opinion, parents have not given English

sufficient attention because of Town x’s social environment as well as English language learning environment .

slide28

Facilities

School B has one language lab designated for ELT . Like school A , classrooms for first and second grade are equipped with multimedia facilities, and the rest are scheduled to be upgraded into multimedia ones in the following three years.

slide29

Teaching English to first graders.

School B started teaching English to first graders twice a week in fall 2004.

It was Pb who first proposed lowering the starting age to the first grade, which was then approved by the school board consisting of School B’s nine major administrators.

Tb2 is the only first grade English teacher, teaching 6 small pilot classes with 32 students in each and one large class with over 50 students.

slide30

Future

Beginning in the 2005-6 school, all students in School B will be learning English. School B plans to recruit another full-time English teacher for 2005-6. Pb and English teachers are optimistic about the future of ELT in School B.

slide32

CONCLUSION

  • The investigation of the four schools illustrated that in the 2004-5 school year, the policy was not universally implemented in school settings.
  • In terms of policy implementation , rural schools fall into three major categories:

1- schools that have fully implemented the policy, like school B.

2- Schools that have partially implemented the policy, like School C.

3- schools that have not implemented the policy, like School D.