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&. The Infusion of ICT into Curriculum Delivery. Welcome. Facilitator: Mary Ann Chaitoo Email: maryannchaitoo@hotmail.com maryannchaitoo2004@yahoo.com. Usernames and Passwords. PC Logon Username: lab5s1 – lab5s21 Password: public1. Safety Moment.

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slide2

Welcome

  • Facilitator: Mary Ann Chaitoo
  • Email: maryannchaitoo@hotmail.com
  • maryannchaitoo2004@yahoo.com
usernames and passwords
Usernames and Passwords

PC Logon

Username: lab5s1 – lab5s21

Password: public1

safety moment
Safety Moment

What would you do if you saw a person, a total stranger, being attacked by another person?

educational philosophy
Educational Philosophy

Three main theoretical schools or philosophical

frameworks have been present in the educational

technology literature.

These are:

  • Behaviorism
  • Cognitivism
  • Constructivism
slide7

Bloom's Taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education.

Bloom's Taxonomy divides educational objectives into three "domains:" Affective, Psychomotor, and Cognitive. Within the taxonomy learning at the higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels (Orlich, et al. 2004). A goal of Bloom's Taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education.

educational technology1
Educational Technology

Educational technology is the study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using and managing appropriate technological processes and resources.

benefits
Benefits

Educational technology is intended to improve

education over what it would be without

Technology:

  • Easy-to-access course materials.
  • Student motivation.
  • Wide participation.
  • Improved student writing.
  • Subjects made easier to learn.
slide10

Instructional Design

Instructional Design is the systematic development of instructional specifications using learning and instructional theory to ensure the quality of instruction. It is the entire process of analysis of learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs. It includes development of instructional materials and activities; and tryout and evaluation of all instruction and learner activities.

instructional problem
Instructional Problem
  • The instructional design process begins with the identification of an instructional problem or need.
  • A need is defined as a gap between what is expected and the existing conditions.
types of id models
Types of ID models
  • Conceptual model - is ‘descriptive and experience-based’ (Richey 1990: 124). She states that conceptual models ‘facilitate an understanding of those factors which impinge on designs and their implementation’ (Richey 1990: 131). The conceptual model ‘encompasses current knowledge, and it is flexible enough to permit the assimilation of new knowledge whenever possible’.
  • Procedural model - According to Richey (1990: 124) procedural models ‘provide specific guidelines on how to carry out the design project’. They give detailed accounts of how to execute given tasks. Richey (ibid) argues that procedural models are ‘product-orientated’.
many id models
Many ID Models
  • Dick & Carey Model
  • Hannafin & Peck Model
  • Knirk & Gustafson Model
  • Jerrold Kemp Model
  • Gerlach-Ely Model
  • Rapid Protyping Model
  • Morrison, Ross and Kemp
six core elements that make an effective id model
Six core elements that make an effective ID model:
  • Determination of learner needs, problems identification,
  • occupational analysis and competence or training
  • requirements.
  • Determination of goals and objectives.
  • Construction of assessment procedures.
  • Designing and selection of proper delivery approaches.
  • Trying-out of instructional system.
  • Installation and maintenance of the system
what is addie
What is ADDIE?
  • A systematic approach (model) for developing effective instruction.
  • One of the most popular models in instructional design.
  • Outcome of each step feeds into the subsequent step.
  • Evaluation is ongoing throughout each layer of design.
a analysis
A = Analysis

In analysis stage of ID process, want to find out:

  • The Learning Problem.
  • Who is the audience?
  • What are audience characteristics?
  • Identify the new behavioral outcome?
  • What types of learning constraints exist?
  • What are the delivery options?
  • What is the timeline for project completion?

Worksheet from http://citt.ufl.edu/team/PGL/modules.htm

d design
D = Design
  • Content of the course
    • Subject matter analysis
  • Steps of instruction
    • Lesson planning-writing performance objectives
    • Decide on Instructional Strategies
  • Type of media or presentation mode
    • Media selection

Worksheet from http://citt.ufl.edu/team/PGL/modules.htm

d development
D = Development

Development of instruction based on Design:

  • Generate lesson plans (different from lesson planning) and lesson materials.
  • Complete all media & materials for instruction, and supporting documents.
  • The project is reviewed and revised according to any feedback given.
  • End result is a course or workshop ready for delivery.

Worksheet from http://citt.ufl.edu/team/PGL/modules.htm

i implementation
I = Implementation
  • During implementation, the plan is put into action and a procedure for training the learner and teacher is developed. 
  • Materials are delivered or distributed to the student group.
  • After delivery, the effectiveness of the training materials is evaluated.

Worksheet from http://citt.ufl.edu/team/PGL/modules.htm

e evaluation
E = Evaluation

Two related evaluations going on simultaneously in most ID situations.

  • Formative Evaluation
  • Summative Evaluation

Worksheet from http://citt.ufl.edu/team/PGL/modules.htm

formative evaluation
Formative Evaluation
  • Going on during & between ID steps.
  • Purpose is to improve instruction before completed instruction is delivered.
summative evaluation
Summative Evaluation
  • Usually occurs after instruction completed & implemented.
  • How much & how well did students learn?
  • How well did course or workshop work?
    • Does it need modification before being presented again?
    • What needs changing? Content? Instruction? Media?
weblogs1
Weblogs
  • What are weblogs or blogs?
  • Purpose of blogs.
  • How to create a blog?

http://moeictintegrationintheclassroom.pbworks.com/Blogs

weblogs or blogs
Weblogs or Blogs

A Weblog is an easily created, easily up-dateable Website that allows an author (or authors) to publish instantly to the Internet from any Internet connection.

weblogs2
Weblogs
  • Not built on static chunks of content.
  • They are comprised of reflections and conversations that in many cases are updated every day.
  • Blogs engage readers with ideas and questions and links. They ask readers to think and to respond. They demand interaction.
the pedagogy of weblogs
The Pedagogy of Weblogs
  • Constructivist activity.
  • Expand the walls of the classroom.
  • Archive the learning that teachers and students do.
  • Democratic tool that supports different learning styles.
  • Enhance the development of expertise.
  • Teach students our new literacies.
a new writing genre
A new writing genre
  • Connective writing
    • A form that forces those who do it to read carefully and critically, that demands clarity and cogency in its construction, that is done for a wide audience, and that links to the sources of the ideas expressed.
using blogger com
Using blogger.com

Sign up @ http://www.blogger.com

wiki vs blog
Wiki vs Blog
  • A personal or corporate website in the form of an online journal, with newentries appearing in sequence as they are written.
  • Knowledge limited by single person or few bloggers of the site.
  • Grows slowly, one post at a time.
  • Discussions take place in the comments of a post, typically approved by blogger.
  • Spam policed by the blogger.
  • A collaborative website which can be directly edited by anyone with access to it.
  • Knowledge comes from community of dozens or even thousands of topic experts.
  • Grows rapidly at all hours of the day. Articles constantly change and continuously updated.
  • Discussions can take place on pages or in the discussion forum (at least in Wetpaint wikis).
  • Spam policed by the community.
wiki vs web page
Open editing

Simple text formatting

Low security or open

Earlier versions stored, can roll back

Collaborative in nature

Pages always considered “in progress”

Limited editing

HTML on many

High security

Early versions not stored

Individual creations

Pages considered finished when published

Wiki vs Web Page
what are educational objectives
What are Educational Objectives?
  • Educational objectives describe the intended result of instruction rather than the process of instruction.
  • A good objective is one that can be assessed to determine the students’ mastery of the course material (measurable).
  • They incorporate words that are clear and concise and open to few interpretations.
    • i.e.. Avoid words like “know” and “understand”.
goals vs objectives
Goals vs Objectives
  • Course goals
    • Describe the overall purpose of the course within the larger curriculum
  • Course objectives
    • Break down goals into measurable behaviors that demonstrate competency
    • Ensure successful accomplishment of course goals
purpose of educational objectives
Purpose of Educational Objectives
  • Facilitate course development through objective-directed planning.
  • Inform students of the expectations of course.
  • Guide the development of instructional activities.
  • Guide the development of assessments and evaluations.
objectives consist of three main components
Objectives consist of three main components
  • Performance
    • What will the students do?
  • Condition
    • Under what conditions will the students perform?
  • Criteria
    • How well with the students perform?
there are three primary types of objectives
There are three primary types of objectives
  • Cognitive
    • knowledge and information related behavior
  • Psychomotor
    • hands-on , doing behavior
  • Affective
    • attitudes, values, feeling, belief-related behavior
bloom s taxonomy
Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Structure for categorizing competencies.
  • Description of skills that must be demonstrated for each level of thinking.
  • Action verbs that elicit student responses within that level.
  • Hierarchical order– simplest to most complex.
  • For example, a low level cognitive objective may be that the learner will “list” the names of countries in Europe. Higher levels would add, “the learner will be able to apply the skills of map reading to establish each countries location”.
characteristics of educational objectives
Characteristics of Educational Objectives
  • Specific and focused
  • Targets performance
  • Realistic to achieve
  • Can be measured and validated
  • Time-bound with a deadline
  • Specifies conditions and criteria that qualifies expected behavior
writing smart objectives
Writing SMART Objectives
  • Practice writing SMART objectives:
    • S – Specific.
    • M – Measurable.
    • A – Attainable.
    • R – Realistic.
    • T – Timely.
slide42

COGNITIVE DOMAIN

Goodhart F., Verdi P., Kennedy S. Assuring Quality in Health Education. Presented at the Mid-Atlantic College Health Association, October 25, 1991. MD,: Baltimore.

Reprinted with permission from Dr. Susan Kennedy

Complex

EVALUATION

The hierarchical steps in the cognitive domain.

appraise

assess

choose

compare

criticize

estimate

evaluate

judge

measure

rank

rate

revise

score

select

SYNTHESIS

Simple

arrange

assemble

collect

compose

construct

create

design

formulate

integrate

manage

organize

plan

prescribe

propose

ANALYSIS

analyze

appraise

calculate

categorize

compare

contrast

debate

diagram

differentiate

examine

inventory

question

test

APPLICATION

apply

calculate

dramatize

employ

examine

illustrate

interpret

operate

practice

schedule

sketch

solve

use

COMPREHENSION

compute

describe

discuss

explain

express

identify

locate

report

restate

review

tell

translate

KNOWLEDGE

cite

count

define

draw

list

name

record

relate

repeat

underline

slide43

CHARACTERIZATION

internalize

verify

(formal instruction

does not address)

ORGANIZATION

codify

discriminate

display

favor

judge

order

organize

relate

systematize

weigh

VALUING

accept

balance

believe

defend

devote

influence

prefer

pursue

seek

value

RESPONDING

behave

complete

comply

cooperate

discuss

examine

obey

observe

respond

RECEIVING

accept

attend

develop

realize

receive

recognize

reply

AFFECTIVE

DOMAIN

Complex

The hierarchical steps in the affective domain.

Simple

Goodhart, F. Verdi P. Kennedy S. Assuring Quality in Health Education.

Presented at the Mid-Atlantic College Health Association,

October 25, 1991, Baltimore.

Reprinted with permission from Dr. Susan Kennedy

slide44

PSYCHOMOTOR

DOMAIN

Complex

ORGANIZATION

construct

create

design

produce

ADAPTATION

COMPLEX OVERT RESPONSE

adapt

build

change

develop

supply

The hierarchical steps in the psychomotor domain.

calibrate

coordinate

demonstrate

maintain

operate

MECHANISM

GUIDED

RESPONSE

adjust

build

illustrate

indicate

manipulate

mix

set up

Simple

copy

determine

discover

duplicate

imitate

inject

repeat

SET

adjust

approach

locate

place

position

prepare

PERCEPTION

distinguish

hear

see

smell

taste

touch

Goodhart, F. Verdi P. Kennedy S. Assuring Quality in Health Education.

Presented at the Mid-Atlantic College Health Association,

October 25, 1991, Baltimore.

Reprinted with permission from Dr. Susan Kennedy

guidelines for writing objectives
Guidelines for Writing Objectives
  • Use action verbs to specify student behavior.
  • Keep statements short and focused on a single outcome.
  • Explain expectations for student behavior, performance & understanding.
  • Use specific terminology that has limited interpretation to ensure that all students understand the same interpretation.
verbs to avoid
Verbs to Avoid
  • Understand
  • Know
  • Learn
  • Comprehend
  • Appreciate
  • Familiarize
  • Realize
  • Be aware of
check each objective
Check Each Objective
  • Does the objective focus on student performance?
  • Is the task measurable or observable?
  • What criteria will I use to establish that the objective has been reached?
assignment
Assignment

Post a blog reflection on the day’s process.