unit 9 the civil war n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
UNIT 9 The Civil War PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
UNIT 9 The Civil War

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 152

UNIT 9 The Civil War - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 111 Views
  • Uploaded on

UNIT 9 The Civil War. Popular Sovereignty. The idea that political authority belongs to the people. Fugitive Slave Act. A law that made it a crime to help runaway slaves. It allowed for their arrest in free states and territories. Compromise of 1850.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

UNIT 9 The Civil War


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. UNIT 9The Civil War

    2. Popular Sovereignty • The idea that political authority belongs to the people

    3. Fugitive Slave Act • A law that made it a crime to help runaway slaves. It allowed for their arrest in free states and territories.

    4. Compromise of 1850 • Compromise offered by Henry Clay which allowed a Free California in exchange for popular Sovereignty for the Utah and New Mexico Territories.

    5. Emancipation Proclamation • A presidential order by Abraham Lincoln freeing slaves in areas rebelling against the Union.

    6. Confederate States of America • The nation formed by southern states after they seceded from the Union.

    7. Secede • The act of formally leaving the Union.

    8. Kansas-Nebraska Act • A law that allowed voters in Kansas and Nebraska Territories to chose whether they wanted to allow slavery.

    9. Fort Sumter • Federal Fort in Charleston Harbor which was the first battle in the Civil War.

    10. Border States • Slave states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Mississippi which did not join the Confederacy.

    11. Lincoln-Douglas Debates • A series of Illinois Senatorial debates between Steven Douglas and Abraham Lincoln that are recognized as a preview of the Presidential election of 1860.

    12. First Battle of Bull Run • First major battle of the Civil War – A Confederate Victory. It showed that the Northern victory would not be easy.

    13. Battle of Antietam • Union Victory that marked the bloodiest day in US History.

    14. Battle of Shiloh • Union Victory that secured control of the Mississippi River.

    15. Battle of Gettysburg • Union Victory that turned the tide of the Civil War against the Confederates.

    16. Gettysburg Address • A speech given by President Lincoln in which he praised Union soldiers and renewed his commitment to winning the war.

    17. Appomattox Courthouse • Virginia town where General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia to the Union Army of General Ulysses S. Grant thus ending the Civil War.

    18. Video • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN2huQB-DmE Ken Burns Causes of the Civil War 3.5 min • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY9zHNOjGrs History at a glance 12 min

    19. Unit Learning Goal • The Civil War resulted from major social, political, and economic differences between North and South

    20. Target A • Explain the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War.

    21. Lesson Learning Goal • You will understand how the Missouri Compromise, Compromise oif 1850, and the Kansas-Nebraska Act created compromise and tension over the issue of slavery in the expanding United States.

    22. Scales – How are you doing? • 4 – I can explain the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give 3 examples from the point of view of the North and South. • 3 –I can identify the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give 2 examples from the point of view of the North and South.

    23. Scales – How are you doing? • 2 –I can list the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give an example from the point of view of the North and South. • 1 – With help, I can identify the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War

    24. Missouri Compromise • Outlawed slavery in all states and territories north of the 36* 30’ latitude • Problem – when the Mexican American War ended, what do you do with that new land?

    25. Compromise of 1850 • California entered the Union as a free state while the rest of the Mexican Cession territory was divided into the Utah and New Mexico Territories where the question of slavery was to be decided by popular sovereignty (the people). • Problem – What to do about the growing number of runaway slaves?

    26. Fugitive Slave Law • Crime to help a runaway slave. Slaves can be arrested in all free states and territories. • Problem, what happens to new territories?

    27. Kansas-Nebraska Act • Eliminates the latitude restriction of the Missouri Compromise • Popular Sovereignty decides slavery in the territories

    28. Scales – How are you doing? • 4 – I can explain the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give 3 examples from the point of view of the North and South. • 3 –I can identify the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give 2 examples from the point of view of the North and South.

    29. Scales – How are you doing? • 2 –I can list the differences between the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War and give an example from the point of view of the North and South. • 1 – With help, I can identify the slavery compromises that led to the Civil War

    30. Bleeding Kansas

    31. Bleeding Kansas • 1854-1858

    32. Bleeding Kansas • 1854-1858 • Pro-slavery settlers invade from Missouri • Anti-slavery settlers invade from New England- Emigrant Aid Company

    33. Bleeding Kansas • 1854-1858 • Pro-slavery settlers invade from Missouri • Anti-slavery settlers invade from New England- Emigrant Aid Company • Rival constitutions and governments

    34. Bleeding Kansas • 1854-1858 • Pro-slavery settlers invade from Missouri • Anti-slavery settlers invade from New England- Emigrant Aid Company • Rival constitutions and governments • Federal Government could not resolve

    35. Charles Sumner “The murderous robbers from Missouri are hirelings, picked from the drunken spew and vomit of an uneasy civilization." "Senator Butler has chosen a mistress. I mean the harlot, slavery."

    36. Senator Charles Sumner R-Massachusetts • Criticized the Kansas Pro-slavery government • Insulted Andrew Butler, a pro-slavery Senator from South Carolina • Representative Preston Brooks, cousin of Butler, attacked Sumner with a cane on the Senate floor

    37. Free Soil Party • Opposed expansion of slavery into the western territories • Party lasted from 1848-1854 • Election of 1848 • Martin Van Buren • (ex-President) • nominated for President

    38. Republican Party •Established in Ripon, Wisconsin •Anti-slavery platform •Consolidated anti-slavery Democrats, Free-Soilers & Whigs •Elephantcreated by cartoonist Thomas Nast, a staunch Republican. Chosen because of its size and strength

    39. Dred Scott

    40. Dred Scott • Slave of Dr. John Emerson from St. Louis

    41. Dred Scott • Slave of Dr. John Emerson from St. Louis • Taken to Illinois in 1836 and Wisconsin in 1838 – both free states

    42. Dred Scott • Slave of Dr. John Emerson from St. Louis • Taken to Illinois in 1836 and Wisconsin in 1838 – both free states • Allowed to marry Harriet Robinson while in Wisconsin

    43. Dred Scott • Slave of Dr. John Emerson from St. Louis • Taken to Illinois in 1836 and Wisconsin in 1838 – both free states • Allowed to marry Harriet Robinson while in Wisconsin • Could have sued for his freedom while in Illinois or Wisconsin because he was in free territory

    44. Dred Scott • Slave of Dr. John Emerson from St. Louis • Taken to Illinois in 1836 and Wisconsin in 1838 – both free states • Allowed to marry Harriet Robinson while in Wisconsin • Could have sued for his freedom while in Illinois or Wisconsin because he was in free territory • Dr. Emerson (an army surgeon) returned to Missouri