Monday September 15th, 2008 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Monday September 15th, 2008

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  1. HOMEWORK STRIKE SYSTEM IN EFFECT: COMPOSITION NOTEBOOK OUT BEFORE BELL MondaySeptember 15th, 2008 Objective(s): • Identify setting and point of view by writing notes in composition notebook. • Analyze setting and point of view by watching selected clips and filling out selected examples. • Judge how point of view effects your opinion of “Two Kinds” by reading and discussing it. Agenda Warm Up in notebook [5 min] Review: Plot (Freytag), Character PP Notes: Setting, Point of View (POV) Textbook  “Two Kinds” (Amy Tan) pg. 94-103 Questions at end if time. Tomorrow = FCA #1

  2. Warm Up (9/15) [5 min] NO NOTES • Look over your notes on characterization from Thurs/Fri. • What is the difference between DIRECT and INDIRECT characterization? • Read the following sentences. Break down the characters into DIRECT and INDIRECT characterization. YOU DO NOT NEED TO WRITE THE SENTENCES. There is an example below. • EXAMPLE: Mr. Hampton, who was young teacher, carried his books as he walked down the hallway. • DIRECT INDIRECT • young teacher loves teaching • carrying books loves reading • walking down the hallway loves walking • 1: Wherever Bob went, he always wore his grey suit. • 2: That is, until the one day Bob met a strange old man. This old man carried a stack of Bibles with him wherever he went—and oddly enough, had red eyes too.

  3. Freytag’s Triangle (plot) Review NO NOTES

  4. Character NO NOTES • Two ways authors reveal a character: • Direct Characterization • Indirect Characterization

  5. Direct Characterization NO NOTES • The author DIRECTLY tells us the traits of that character.

  6. Characterization NO NOTES • Example: • Bob was a serious person who loved to study. Whenever his friends were playing outside, Bob was in his house, reading books. • What does the author tell us DIRECTLY about Bob?

  7. Indirect Characterization NO NOTES • The author hints at what the character is like—through their clothing, what they carry with them. • Anything and everything can be indirect—even something as small as their eyes. • Allows the reader room for interpretation about a character.

  8. Stock Characters NO NOTES • Stock characters are characters that fit our NATURAL ideas about what a character should look/act/be like. • Remember, THE WIZARD—without me saying anything, 99% of us drew the hat/staff/crystal ball.

  9. Parts of Fiction NO NOTES • Plot • Characters • Setting • Point of View • Theme

  10. Setting TAKE NOTES • Setting is, most simply, where the story takes place. Broadly speaking, setting includes: • Time • Location • Circumstance

  11. Setting NO NOTES • Setting is, most simply, where the story takes place. Broadly speaking, setting includes: • Time (High Noon) • Location (A saloon, the Wild West) • Circumstance (During a gun fight)

  12. Setting Practice NO NOTES • Time (3:20PM) • Location (NMHS Bus Loop) • Circumstance (The school bell has just rung) • PREDICT: What is going to happen?

  13. Setting Practice NO NOTES • Time (Midnight) • Location (A graveyard) • Circumstance (A 15-year old student is sleeping next to a tombstone) • PREDICT: What is going to happen?

  14. POV TAKE NOTES • Point of View (POV) looks at WHO is telling the story. • 1st person: uses “I.” • Example: I walked down the beach until I saw her. • 2nd person: uses “you.” • Example: You walked down the beach until you saw her. • THIS IS VERY RARE IN FICTION. • 3rd person: uses “he/she.” • Example: He walked down the beach until he saw her. • THIS IS THE MOST COMMON

  15. POV TAKE NOTES • The same EVENT can have MULTIPLE points of view. • CLIP “Vantage Point.”

  16. POV Practice NO NOTES • The same EVENT can have MULTIPLE points of view. • A mother and daughter (who is—14 let’s say) argue about the daughter’s boyfriend (who is—18 let’s say) taking her to senior prom. • PUT YOURSELF IN BOTH OF “THEIR SHOES”: • Mother: • Daughter :

  17. Textbook, “Two Kinds, ”pg. 94-103 NO NOTES