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National Parks - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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National Parks
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  1. National Parks ‘a sort of national property in which every man has a right and interest who has an eye to perceive and a heart to enjoy’,William Wordsworth (1810) in his Guide to the Lakes These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. 1 of 34 © Boardworks Ltd 2005

  2. Where are the National Parks? • What is a National Park? • Why do people visit the Lake District? • What are the consequences of tourism in the Lake District? • How can tourism be managed? Learning objectives

  3. Where are the National Parks? There are 12 National Parks in England and Wales. The New Forest became a National Park in 2005. The South Downs is currently in the process of being designated a National Park. There are two National Parks in Scotland – The Cairngorms, and Loch Lomand & the Trossachs.

  4. Where are the National Parks? • With the help of an atlas, describe the distribution of the National Parks in England and Wales. • Consider their position in relation to human and natural features such as motorways, settlements and highland areas.

  5. Where are the National Parks?

  6. Landscapes of National Parks Describe the landscapes of these National Parks. Exmoor Lake District Snowdonia

  7. Where are the National Parks? • What is a National Park? • Why do people visit the Lake District? • What are the consequences of tourism in the Lake District? • How can tourism be managed? Learning objectives

  8. What are National Parks? National Parks are protected areas of natural beauty. The areas include mountains, moorland, heathland, woodland and coasts. National Parks are not theme parks – they are not fenced off and people live and work in them. Each National Park is managed by a National Park Authority (NPA), which works to balance the needs of the landscape, the residents and the visitors. Snowdonia Exmoor

  9. What are the aims of the National Parks? • To protect and enhance the natural beauty and wildlife. • To promote the understanding and enjoyment of the Parks. • To foster the social and economic well-being of the communities living in the National Parks. Can you see how these duties may conflict with one another?

  10. Private Forestry Commission National Trust Water companies Ministry of Defence National Parks Others Land ownership in Britain’s National Parks Study the pie chart showing the land ownership in Britain’s National Parks. • Who owns most of the land? • Why may it be difficult for the National Park Authorities to control what happens in the National Parks?

  11. Where are the National Parks? • What is a National Park? • Why do people visit the Lake District? • What are the consequences of tourism in the Lake District? • How can tourism be managed? Learning objectives

  12. Why do people visit the Lake District? Study the photographs!

  13. Why do people visit the Lake District? Make a list of activities people can do in the Lake District.

  14. Major honeypot areas in the Lake District Where are the major honeypot areas in the Lake District? Major honeypot areas

  15. What is a honeypot site? A honeypot site is a place of natural or historical interest that attracts people in large numbers. What features make Lake Windermere a honeypot site? the Lake District’s only car ferry picnic sites and car parks National Park tourist information centre boating on Lake Windermere viewpoints across Lake Windermere camping and caravan sites, hotels and cafes

  16. Grasmere – another honeypot site Former home of William Wordsworth Grasmere’s population can swell from 800 people to 10,000 on a sunny summer’s day!

  17. Where are the National Parks? • What is a National Park? • Why do people visit the Lake District? • What are the consequences of tourism in the Lake District? • How can tourism be managed? Learning objectives

  18. Consequences of tourism in the Lake District? Study the photographs!

  19. Consequences of tourism

  20. Consequences of tourism

  21. Consequences of tourism

  22. How does footpath erosion occur?

  23. Examination question Study the photographs. Give three reasons why tourists might be attracted to these areas. What benefits may tourists bring to these areas?

  24. Where are the National Parks? • What is a National Park? • Why do people visit the Lake District? • What are the consequences of tourism in the Lake District? • How can tourism be managed? Learning objectives

  25. Managing tourism in the Lake District How is tourism managed in the Lake District? separate trails for mountain-bikers improved public transport park-and-ride schemes speed restrictions on the lakes, e.g. 10 mph on Lake Windermere ban of second homes promotion of ‘timeshare’ holiday homes, e.g. Great Langdale holiday homes limited car parking repair of stone walls and eroded footpaths e.g. footpath repair at Dollywagon Pike screening of car parks and industry by planting trees traffic restrictions Select 3 ways of managing tourism in the Lake District and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

  26. Managing tourism in the Lake District The Lake District National Park Authority (LDNPA) has a duty to ensure that tourism is sustainable. ‘The aim of sustainable development is to use resources in a wiser, fairer and more balanced way. The quality of people's lives and the state of our communities is affected by a combination of economic, social and environmental factors. These factors are interlinked and it is important that our actions show positive benefits for all three, not just for today, but for future generations as well.’ LDNPA

  27. Managing tourism in the Lake District Education schemes are one approach that the National Park Authority is using to manage tourism in the Lake District: The NPA promotes schemes to persuade people not to use their cars. The Car Free CareFree scheme is an example of this. The Countryside Code is aimed at educating visitors on how they should act responsibly in the National Park.

  28. Managing tourism in the Lake District A 10mph speed limit has been imposed on Lake Windermere. Explain why management schemes can create conflicts.

  29. Managing tourism in the Lake District Some of the scars created by footpath erosion are so large they can be seen in satellite images! The LDNPA has launched a Fix the Fells scheme which aims at fundraising money for the repair of over 145 seriously eroded footpaths. Footpath repair is carried out using local plant species and avoids the use of visually obtrusive materials. All path building is carried out using local and traditional methods. LDNPA’s advice to walkers: ‘There are many lower fells which are not only less crowded, but often have better views and are less demanding. Avoid walking to the sides of paths or taking shortcuts.’ Explain why the LDNPA advises visitors where and how to walk!

  30. Managing tourism in the Lake District

  31. 740000 720000 700000 680000 babies born 660000 people died 640000 620000 600000 580000 1997 UK Population Do we still need National Parks? Since 1950, 28% of Britain’s moorland has been lost. Land in England is being developed at the rate of 11,000 ha each year. The population of the UK will keep rising until 2036.

  32. Examination question Use examples you have studied to show how tourism can damage environments and how the damage might be managed. This question demands examples – aim to get all of these named places into your answer! • Bowness • Gamlin End • Troutbeck • Grasmere • Lake Windermere

  33. The National Park quiz

  34. Key ideas • There are 12 National Parks in England and Wales. National Parks are protected areas of natural beauty. • Each National Park is managed by a National Park Authority, which works to balance the needs of the landscape, the residents and the visitors. • The physical and human characteristics of the Lake District National Park attract over 12 million visitors a year. • A honeypot site is a place of natural or historical interest that attracts people in large numbers. Examples include Bowness and Grasmere. • Tourism creates a range of environmental and socio-economic consequences. Many of these are negative. • The National Park Authority aims to manage tourism in a sustainable way.