part 1 the journey begin n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
PART 1 THE JOURNEY BEGIN PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
PART 1 THE JOURNEY BEGIN

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

PART 1 THE JOURNEY BEGIN - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 118 Views
  • Uploaded on

PART 1 THE JOURNEY BEGIN. Ibn Battuta started on his travels when he was 21 years old in 1325. His main reason to travel was to go on a Hajj, or the Pilgrimage to Makkah (Mecca), as all Muslims are instructed to do.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'PART 1 THE JOURNEY BEGIN' - cleary


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide4

IbnBattuta started on his travels when he was 21 years old in 1325.

  • His main reason to travel was to go on a Hajj, or the Pilgrimage to Makkah (Mecca), as all Muslims are instructed to do.
  • In 1325, he left Tangier, his born place to make a pilgrimage to Makkah (Mecca). He was eager for more learning and adventure.
  • IbnBattuta travelled overland at first alone riding a donkey. Then for protection he joined a caravan with other pilgrims and traders.
slide5

The trip was a grand study tour of the World of Islam - Dar al-Islam.

  • For IbnBattuta it was an opportunity to acquire knowledge of religion and law, and meet with other Muslim scholars.
  • From Tangier, the travelers arrived at the port of Algiers where they camped outside the city walls waiting for other pilgrims to join the caravan.
  • Then they traveled through forests of oak and cedar, mountains and valleys before reaching the city of Bijaya.
  • Here IbnBattuta became ill, but he pushed on anxious to get on with his trip. He was advised to stay and rest, but he insisted on continuing.
slide6

Next the group of travelers entered Tunis, a city of about 100,000 - a major city of Islamic art and learning.

  • It contained splendid mosques and palaces, public gardens, colleges and a shipping port of north African products.
  • Here he stayed in a college (madrasa) dormitory and met with the scholars and judges in high positions.
  • The group left Tunis in a larger caravan of pilgrims and IbnBattuta was even appointed qadi (judge and settler of disputes) for the hajj caravan.
  • His caravan continued across the coastal Libyan countryside. Near Tripoli a band of camel robbers attacked the caravan waving their swords
slide7

Sometime in 1326, the caravan reached Alexandria at the western end of the Nile Delta. IbnBattuta was very impressed with Alexandria.

  • At this time Alexandria was a busy harbor firmly controlled by Egypt's Mamluk warrior caste who had governed that country.
  • IbnBattuta visited other cities on the Nile Delta, and continued on to Cairo (or "al-Qahirah" - "the Victorious") founded in the 10th century by the Fatimid dynasty.
  • IbnBattuta goes on to describe the city's many mosques, colleges, hospitals, and convents which housed the poor.
journey to the jerusalem
JOURNEY TO THE JERUSALEM
  • IbnBattuta left Cairo and headed to Damascus, Syria along the Royal Road.
  • The Mamluk government organized caravans to carry pilgrims and merchants along this trail.
  • At this time, Mamluk Empire had been in fierce battles with Mongol Invaders.
  • Then he arrived at Damascus, where he could connect with a Hajj caravan and complete his trip to Makkah in safety.
  • There were also other holy sites to see on this part of his trip: Al-Khalil (Hebron), Al-Quds (Jerusalem), Bethlehem, and more.
  • Hebron is a holy site for Muslims, Christians, and Jews since it is the burial place of the "fathers" or "patriarchs" of monotheism (belief in one God): Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
slide9

Continuing northward he visited and described more holy places, many towns destroyed by the crusades, such as Tyre and Acre, and he described many castles.

  • Then he arrived in Jerusalem which was a rather small town at that time, with a population of only about 10,000.
  • IbnBattuta stayed in Jerusalem for about one week. Because the Hajj season would begin soon, he continued on to Damascus and arrived there during the Holy Month of Ramadan, 1326.
  • Damascus had once been the capital of the Umayyad Empire founded by Muawiya
  • At the time IbnBattuta visited Damascus, it was an international supermarket. Its population was about 100,000 people.
slide10

During his stay in the city, IbnBattuta may have lived in this mosque's dormitory, sitting beneath the marble columns and listening to lecturers and Quranic readers.

  • He spent much of his time studying and meeting famous teachers and judges.
  • His entire stay in Damascus took place during the month of Ramadan.
  • Here he married again, but divorced shortly afterward, and later he had fathered a son.
  • He learned about having a son after he had continued on, and later sent a present of money to him.
the hajj macca and medina
THE HAJJ, MACCA AND MEDINA
  • The Hajj caravan was probably several thousand people.
  • Because IbnBattuta is poor, a law professor hired camels for him and gave him traveling provisions, and money. And so he finally began his hajj.
  • The distance from Damascus to Medina was about 820 miles, and the caravan normally covered it in 45 to 60 days.
  • Without any serious incidents, the caravan arrived at Medina, City of the Apostle of God - a little island of fertility in the desert.
  • After he left Medina, IbnBattuta performed the rituals within Mecca dressed in the simple white "ihram" cloth worn.
slide12

IbnBattuta stayed in Mecca for three weeks making visits to other sites, meeting with holy men, and studied with them.

  • He had taken a year and a half to reach his destination of Mecca from his homeland of Morocco, and he would make three other trips to Mecca in his lifetime.
  • But rather than return home, he thought about the adventures of travel, of getting a job as a scholar or judge.
slide14

Aley ( Asia Minor)

Mecca

Cairo, Palestine &

Syria

Black Sea

Across Anatolia & Sinope by sea

Delhi

Constantinople

Hindukush

Khurasan

Enjoys the patronage of Sultan Muhammad Tughlaq

Visited cities

Goa

Maldive Islands

Ma’bar

Bengal

slide15

Sumatra

Canton

China

Peking

Sent as Sultan’s envoy to China

Dhafari & Muscat

Mecca

  • Through Paris, Iran, Iraq, Syria,
  • Palestine and Egypt
  • Made his 7th & last pilgrimage(Nov 1348 Masihi
  • Returned to hometown (Fez)
part 3 the last journey
PART 3 : THE LAST JOURNEY
  • After IbnBattuta returned to Fez in 1354, the Sultan of Morocco listened to his report on Mali,West Africa.
  • He also listened to IbnBattuta's other adventures, and ordered him to stay in Fez.
  • He wanted to have these stories written down for the amusement of his family and others.
  • So IbnBattuta was commanded to dictate an account of the cities which he had seen in his travel, and of the interesting events which had clung to his memory.
  • The Sultan hired a young writer - IbnJuzayy - the young man IbnBattuta had met in Granada three years earlier.
slide17

IbnJuzayy must have been excited about such a task.

  • He had been fascinated by IbnBattuta's stories earlier, and as a young writer, this job was one that could earn him respect.
  • He was to put the stories into the proper form of a travel book, called a "rihla".
  • And so began the retelling of his adventures that had begun twenty-nine years before. IbnBattuta wove his observations and hearsay, history and odds and ends into his story.
  • IbnJuzayy added poetry here and there, but generally he kept to IbnBattuta's telling.
  • IbnJuzayy borrowed descriptions of Mecca, Medina and Damascus from a twelfth century traveler named IbnJubayr, and perhaps descriptions of other places from other travelers, too. And so the book grew.
slide18

When it was finished, The Rihla had little impact upon the Muslim world.

  • However, it was copied by hand and the whole book or shortened versions might be found in some libraries, or carried around by travelers who followed on parts of his trips.
  • It was not until the 19th century that some of the Arabic books were found and translated into French, German, and then English.
  • Then the book began to receive the attention it deserves as a record of history.
  • IbnBattuta died in 1368 or 1369.
  • Tour guides in Tangier take tourists to see an unmarked grave that they claim to be his, but no one can confirm it as his final resting place.
slide19

Aley ( Asia Minor)

Mecca

Cairo, Palestine &

Syria

Black Sea

Across Anatolia & Sinope by sea

Delhi

Constantinople

Hindukush

Khurasan

Enjoys the patronage of Sultan Muhammad Tughlaq

Visited cities

Goa

Maldive Islands

Ma’bar

Bengal

slide20

Sumatra

Canton

China

Peking

Sent as Sultan’s envoy to China

Dhafari & Muscat

Mecca

  • Through Paris, Iran, Iraq, Syria,
  • Palestine and Egypt
  • Made his 7th & last pilgrimage(Nov 1348 Masihi
  • Returned to hometown (Fez)
the journey of ibn batutta part 1

The Journey of Ibn BatuttaPart 1

Tangier

Tunis

Libyan

Alexandria

Damascus,

Syria

Cairo

Mecca

Damascus

Jerusalem

Medina

Mecca

Monggol

Persian

Basra

Baghdad

Tabriz

Baghdad

Shiraz

Isfahan

Mecca