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Last time. About the use of binoculars. Telescope types. Types of mount. Finders, eye pieces, etc. Setting up and using visually. Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society. This week: Observing. About observation. Types of observation.

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last time
Last time

About the use of binoculars.

Telescope types.

Types of mount.

Finders, eye pieces, etc.

Setting up and using visually.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

this week observing
This week: Observing

About observation

Types of observation

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide3

So what are going to be seeing when we observe?

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

our solar system
Our Solar System

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

our solar system1
Our Solar System

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide9

Jupiter

Saturn

Mars

Aldebaran

Venus

Mercury

Martin Crow 2002 April 24

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide10

2010 April 04

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

our solar system2
Our Solar System

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide12

Mars 2003 Aug 23

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide15

Jupiter 2011 Nov 19

DMK 41as02, 2.5x powermate on C9.25

Processed in Avistax

Martin Crow

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

our solar system3
Our Solar System

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide28

The Magnitude system

The scale of measuring brightness is believed to have originated with

Hipparchus (190 BC – 120 BC). It divide up the visible stars into 6 brightness's,

1 for the brightest and 6 for the faintest.

In 1856 Norman Pogson formalised this by defining a 1st magnitude star as

100 times brighter than a 6th magnitude star. Therefore the difference between

magnitudes is the 5th root of 100 = 2.51.

So: 1st to 2nd magnitude has difference of 2.51

1st to 3rd =2.51 x 2.51 = 6.3

1st to 4th = 2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 = 15.8

1st to 5th =2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 = 39.7

1st to 6th = 2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 x 2.51 = 100

The star Vega is set at zero magnitude. This is its apparent magnitude.

On this scale Sirius is -1.4, the Moon -12.74 and the Sun -26.74

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing
Types of observing

Visual observing

The eye is our primary means of exploring the world around us.

Good for exploring the whole sky

Doing meteor watches

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing1
Types of observing

Visual observing

The eye is our primary means of exploring the world around us.

Good for exploring the whole sky

Doing meteor watches

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide32

Nick James

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing2
Types of observing

Visual observing

The eye is our primary means of exploring the world around us.

Good for exploring the whole sky

Doing meteor watches

Observing eclipses of the Sun an Moon

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing3
Types of observing

Visual observing

The eye is our primary means of exploring the world around us.

Good for exploring the whole sky

Doing meteor watches

Observing eclipses of the Sun an Moon

Observing atmospheric phenomena

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide37

Honor Wheeler

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing4
Types of observing

Visually assisted observing

Binoculars

Good for exploring the sky more deeply

Variable stars

Solar observing – not direct

The Classical planets and some of the brighter asteroids

Comets

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing5
Types of observing

Visually assisted observing

Telescopes

Good for fainter objects

Variable stars

Double stars

Solar observations – not direct

Luna observations

Planetary observations

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing6
Types of observing

Imaging

Point and shoot and DSLR cameras on or off a tripod

Good for wide field sky shots – constellations, atmospheric phenomena, meteors and planetary conjunctions.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide49

Honor Wheeler

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide52

Jupiter

Saturn

Mars

Aldebaran

Venus

Mercury

Martin Crow 2002 April 24

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing7
Types of observing

Imaging

Point and shoot cameras set up afocally on a telescope

Moon images

Solar images – not direct

Planets

Maybe some of the brighter deep sky objects

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide54

Images of the eclipsed Moon require longer

Exposure times.

Exposures of 1/125 sec @ iso 100 will get you started, though experimentation will give

the best results.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide56

Exposures of between 1/30 to 1/5 sec at iso 100 are to be expected.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

slide57

Pleiades

M42

Both images were on a driven mount

Exposures of 15 sec in both cases.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing8
Types of observing

Imaging

DSLR on a driven equatorial mounted telescope

Luna images

Solar images

Planets

Comets

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing9
Types of observing

Imaging

DSLR on a polar aligned driven equatorial mounted telescope

Deep sky objects

Photometry of variable star and asteroids

Faint comets

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing10
Types of observing

Imaging

Web cam on a driven equatorial mounted telescope

High resolution image of the Moon and planets

High resolution white light images of sunspots

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

web cam technology
Web cam technology

Image of Jupiter taken using film (1990).

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

What you need:

A webcam with CCD sensor

Adapter and infrared blocking filter

A laptop and free software from the internet – Registax or Avistack.

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets1
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

How does it work?

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets2
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets3
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

Registax in action – hopefully!

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets4
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets5
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing the planets6
Observing the Planets

With a telescope and webcam (Lucky dip imaging)

Images by Simon Dawes

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

types of observing11
Types of observing

Data mining

Zooniverse

Solar and Heliospheric Observatory

Astrogrid

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

local and national societies

www.cmhas.wikispaces.com

Local and National societies

Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

local and national societies1

www.britastro.org

Local and National societies

British Astronomical Association

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

observing
Observing

Keep an observing log book

Date and time yyyy/mm/ddhr:mm UT

Weather – cloud, haze, temp.

Seeing

I – perfect seeing, without a quiver

II – slight undulations, with moments of lasting calm

III – moderate seeing, with larger tremors

IV – poor seeing, with constant troublesome undulations

V – very bad seeing, scarcely allowing a rough sketch to be made

Observing targets

Equipment used

Note and comments

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

before you go out
Before you go out

Plan what you are going to observe

Think about what you hope to see – use reference material.

Think about what you might need:

Red light

Planisphere \ chart book

Note book \ recording sheet and pencil

Warm clothes

Hand warmers

Flask of coffee or tea

Garden recliner?

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society

any questions
Any questions

Martin Crow Crayford Manor House Astronomical Society