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T utoring methods to improve Reading C omprehension Skills

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  1. Tutoring methods to improve Reading Comprehension Skills María Alejandra Torres Jiménez Sara Inés Zuluaga Cano GI School 2012

  2. Introduction • Increase reading Comprehension levels : Tutoring • Didactic Workshops • Applied at GI School Second grade students • Strengthen the reading Comprehension skills improving the areas that requires this ability. • Educational Scheme: Involves English and Spanish • High understanding and interpretation aptitudes

  3. Justification • Students’ situation: • Difficulties with reading understanding • Struggles with pronunciation • Troubles with subjects that involve reading skills • Motives: • Reinforce reading skills promoting better communication competences • Guide students to become leaders of the community • Enhance reading habits in students • Encourage reading techniques to rise the reading comprehension skills.

  4. “ The mission of the GI School is to form well- rounded successful leaders who communicate effectively and confidently on a universal level "

  5. Relation (Mission) • Form well-rounded successful leaders by providing the students with competent speaking and reading skills. • Encourage English communication abilities to form leaders who communicate efficiently with the world. • Guide students to become leaders of the society by promoting social responsibility and respect for the school. • Pursue new manners of communication or languages to communicate efficiently with the world.

  6. “ In the year 2020 we will be a community that educates for life through innovative and interactive methods that motivate learning. "

  7. Relation (Vision) • Generate didactic and methodological ways of learning reading comprehension skills. • Endorse tutoring methods among students to establish interactive methods that encourage learning. • Tutor students with reading and interpretation skills to motivate reading habits, educating for life not just for class. • Make students understand that there are many ways to learn and develop their potential without the teaching being tiresome or demanding.

  8. Research Question • Which reading strategies to strengthen reading comprehension skills are more useful and promising, so the students learn how to interpret and understand successfully the academic texts? • How could school continue using this program in the future?

  9. Objectives • General objective: • Generate several learning strategies like workshops and tutoring to enhance the reading comprehension abilities in the students who show difficulties with the development of this skill.

  10. Specific objective: • Identify the students with major difficulties • Select and apply the workshops and activities • Integrate the National Honor Society students as tutors • Encourageservicetotheschoolcommunity bythe Honor Society students. • Endorse the use of reading techniques for a bettercomprehension.

  11. Hipothesis If we execute the different activities with the second grade students of GI School during the tutoring sessions, their reading comprehension and speaking skills will improve substantially.

  12. TheoreticalFramework • Conceptual Framework: • Reading Comprehension • Refers to the last objective of the reader process, taking into account the previous knowledge and the interaction with the elements of the reading. • Learning Strategies: • Refers to the operations or mental activities that simplify the learning processes. • Didactic: • It is a pedagogy element that supports the progessive learning of habits and techniques of students formation and growth. • Learning: • One of the essential mechanisms of development of life.

  13. Didactic Game: • Participative technique of educationestablish to improve the acquisition of knowledge and the enlargement of skills. • Theoric Framework: • Reading Comprehension as cognitive process: • Levels of comprehension of a writing. • K. Goodman Model: • Through cycles and strategiesbuild up systemsthatmakes it easy tounderstand the readings. • Beginning of the reading comprehension: • Basic ideas that guide the development of reading comprehension.

  14. Referential Framework: • H. Isenberg textual model • Eightaspects a textmusthave to be consider in that category. • T. Van Dijk textual model • A text is more than a sequence of phrases; it has levels and dimensions. • F. Smith Model • Reading is not only a visual activity;itinvolves visual and non-visual information. • Factorsimply in reading comprehension: • Sketch of the variables related with the reading comprehension

  15. Field Work • First contact with the students

  16. Diagnostic Session: • Student selection: - Two tests • 1. Executed by the GI School • 2. Performance study • Analyze weakest areas of the students to reinforce • Interview some of the studentswhowerepart of the preceding project. • Apply a systematicobservationon the reading behaviors of the students.

  17. Insertar video de la entrevista

  18. First Session: • Beginning of the tutoring period. • The researchers had to begin with four students because the total selected students didn’t show up. • Each of the National Honor Society students who were involved acted as asupporter for onesecondgrader. • The activity was develop as it was planned.

  19. Second Session: • The assistance of the group increased a little. • First group: reading of “Jack and Lily´s Favorite Food” • Second Group: SoundPractice for consonants F,G,H,I,J and SH compound. • The activities were successfully executed.

  20. Third Session: • The reading process of some students wasslowed downdue to lack of assistance. • First group: reading of “When is Nighttime”, • Second Group: • SoundPractice consonants K to O and TH compound were scheduled. • changed for a review of the previous concepts.

  21. Fourth Session: • Lack of assistance was consider a threat for the develop of the project. • Two tutors wereassigned per kiddue to the reduced group of secondgraders. • First group: reading of “Feelings” • Second Group: SoundPractice consonants from P to Z.

  22. Fifth Session: • Thanks to the homeroomteacher‘s help, the assistance increased • First group: reading of “What is at the Zoo” • - two additional workshops were included in this session to motivate students with artistic activities. • Second Group: Review of the consonants workshops

  23. Sixth Session: • Application period was extended due to the lack of assistance. • First group: reading of “Making Salsa” • Second Group: First application examination (individually)

  24. Seventh Session: • Uniform and successfuldevelopmentof the workshops • First group: reading of “What do I Wear” • Second Group: First reading activity • - " Sam and the Sap" and “Consonant S"

  25. Eighth Session: • Assistance was an alarm, but then the students arrived; they were just late. • First group: reading of “We make a Snowman” • Second Group: Reading activity • " Don and Dots" and "Consonant D"

  26. Ninth Session: • To this session all the second grade students attended the tutoring. • First group: reading of “Tools” ,consequent workshops • Second Group: Reading activity • " Red Hen and Rod Rat" and "Consonant R"

  27. Tenth Session: • More than half of the participating students arrived on time for the tenth session. • First group: reading of “What I Want,” consequent workshops • Second Group: Reading activity • " Crazy Cat" and "Consonant C"

  28. Final Diagnose Session: • It wasdevelopafter the return of the students from Christmas vacations. • First group: reading of “What Do you See” , Level D • Second Group: Reading of “ I Can Be”, Level C • Both diagnoses were one level above the one the group was working with.

  29. Product • Better Comprehension skills in the second grade students • Encouragement of reading habits in youngkids. • Tutoring of reading techniques and interpretation methods • Changes in the ways students approach and analyze a text. • Development of confidence in students to answer reading questions.

  30. Conclusion • The tutoring sessions were advantageous for the reinforcement of reading comprehension skills. • The reading techniques the students learned provided them with more confidence to answer questions. • The resultswould be higherif the tutoringprogramwasdevelopedduring a larger period of time. • The tutoring program is useful for any grade or reading level .

  31. Comparative chart

  32. The workshops and tutoring program were qualified as reinforcement for reading comprehension skills. • The pedagogy strategies and activities fulfilled the main objective. • Theactivities before, during and after the reading facilitated the reading comprehension and interpretation skills. • The active participation of the tutors enabled the satisfactory development of the project .

  33. Future applications • Weaknesses: • First time tutoring • Short application period of time • Lack of analysis of the learning process • Opportunities: • Didactic material • Help from an English teacher • Develop in a low grade

  34. Strengths: • Wide English knowledge • Continue with thestudents who wereworkingduring this application. • The selection of ansmall and well-behavegroup. • The involvement in the application process. • Threats: • Extra-classesschedule • Participating students assistance • Parents and teachers support • Extension of the applicationprocess

  35. Bibliography Beltrán, J. 1996. Procesos, estrategias y técnicas de aprendizaje. Madrid. En Estrategias de aprendizaje. Pg. 5-7. Reynoso, E. [Versión Digital (PDF)]. Camargo, Z y Uribe, G y Caro, M. (2009). Modelos de comprensión y producción textual. En didáctica de la comprensión y producción de textos académicos. 3.1.3.2.1. Pg.129. Armenia, Quindío. Camargo, Z y Uribe, G y Caro, M. (2009).Una aproximación lingüística al proceso de comprensión y producción de textos expositivos-explicativos. En didáctica de la comprensión y producción de textos académicos. 2.1.1.1. Pg.60. Armenia, Quindío. Camargo, Z y Uribe, G y Caro, M. (2009).Modelos de la comprensión y producción de textos académicos. En didáctica de la comprensión y producción de textos académicos. 3.1.3.2.2. Pg.130. Armenia, Quindío. Camargo, Z y Uribe, G y Caro, M. (2009).Modelos de comprensión y producción textual. En didáctica de la comprensión y producción de textos académicos. 3.1.3.1. Pg.128. Armenia, Quindío.

  36. Gonzales, C. (2005). Comprensión lectora en niños morfosintaxis y prosodia en acción. Granada. Universidad de Granada, Facultad de psicología, departamento de psicología evolutiva y de la educación. Moreno, V. (2003). Leer para comprender. Navarra, España. Blitz, Serie amarilla, 4. Edición: Gobierno de Navarra, Departamento de Educación y cultura. [Versión Digital. (PDF)]. Morgado, C. (2007). Definición de Didáctica. Psicología de la educación para padres y profesionales. Recuperado el 13 de septiembre de 2011. De http://www.psicopedagogia.com/definicion/didactica Ortiz, A. (2002). Jugando también se aprende. Monografías. Recuperado el 13 de septiembre de 2011. De http://www.monografias.com/trabajos28/didactica-ludica/didactica-ludica.shtml Vygotsky, L. Definición de Teoría del aprendizaje de Vygotsky. Psicología de la educación para padres y profesionales. Recuperado el 13 de septiembre de 2011. De http://www.psicopedagogia.com/definicion/didactica

  37. Thank you for your attention!