slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Middle Years Program : A brief introduction

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 57

Middle Years Program : A brief introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 112 Views
  • Uploaded on

Middle Years Program : A brief introduction. Middle Years Program (MYP). A five year program Stressing a cademic challenges and life skills. Middle Years Program (MYP). For students aged 11 to 16. A critical phase of personal and intellectual development

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Middle Years Program : A brief introduction' - cherie


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
a five year program stressing a cademic challenges and life skills
Middle Years Program (MYP)

A five year program

Stressing academic challenges

and life skills

for students aged 11 to 16
Middle Years Program (MYP)

For students aged 11 to 16

A critical phase of personal and intellectual development

A time of uncertainty, sensitivity, resistance and questioning

promotes
Middle Years Program

Promotes:

discipline

creativity

skills

flexibility

Intercultural awareness

the myp embraces but transcends traditional school subjects
Middle Years Program

The MYP embraces but transcends traditional school subjects

Flexible framework

Schools may organize subjects in different ways

the myp in brief
Middle Years Program

The MYP in brief

Technology

The MYP provides a thorough study of various disciplines

It accentuates their interrelatedness

It acknowledges the role of the disciplines and transdisciplinary study

the curriculum8
Middle Years Program

The curriculum

Areas of interaction:

These five perspectives/ themes / lensesare at the core of the MYP

approaches to learning

community service

health and social education

environment

Creativity (homo faber)

a reas of interaction
Middle Years Program

The curriculum

Areas of interaction

are themes/ lenses, not subjects

pervade and recur throughout the five years

a reas of interaction through the subjects
Middle Years Program

The curriculum

Areas of interactionthrough the subjects

and also through

interdisciplinary teaching and projects

whole school activities

the MYP personal project in the 10th

grade year

p ersonal p roject
Middle Years Program

The curriculum

Personal Project

10th Grade Year

an independent piece of work

the culmination of the student’s involvement with the five areas of interaction

slide13
Middle Years Program
  • Training centered in instructional approaches and assessment that are content specific
  • Training in meeting the needs of various learning styles, and emphasis in developing the whole student
  • Training to deliver a program designed for motivated learners
what the evaluation does
Evaluating teaching and learning

Middle Years Program

What the evaluation does

assesses the effectiveness of the delivery of the curriculum at the school

assesses the progress of student learning

slide15
Assessing the student

Middle Years Program

Middle Years Program teachers organize their own student assessment and reporting procedures, in accordance with the objectives of the program

assessment along the way formative assessment s pecial emphasis on it in the myp
Assessing the student

Middle Years Program

Assessment along the way…formative assessmentspecial emphasis on it in the MYP

Used at different stages of the learning process

Used to guide instructional decisions

slide17
Assessing the student

Middle Years Program

Teachers:

  • measure the progress of the student
  • use formative assessment to

adjust teaching plans and

methods

  • Students:
  • do formative self-assessment of their work
  • reflect on their own approaches to learning
mission statements
IBO:

The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peacefulworld through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programs of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programs encourage student across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences can also be right.

PPS:

Portage Public Schools will shape the future by empowering every student to contribute intelligently and ethically in an information rich, global society. (Vision)

Through a partnership of school staff, students, parents and community, all Portage Public Schools students will become effective communicators, responsible citizens, self-directed learners and complex thinkers.

Middle Years Program

Mission Statements
mission statements cont
IBO:

The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peacefulworld through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programs of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programs encourage student across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences can also be right.

PPS:

The school staff will:

Ensure high quality innovative curriculum, research-based instruction, opportunities for practice, and measurement of student achievement, that is customized to meet all students' needs.

Ensure a safe learning environment that empowers students to be responsible, confident, independent thinkers who are able to monitor their own behaviors and performances.

Build positive relationships in a professional, ethical manner by honoring diversity, modeling life skills, and meeting the physical and emotional needs of all students.

Be technologically literate, complex thinkers in an ever-changing profession.

Middle Years Program

Mission Statements, cont.
mission statements cont20
IBO:

The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peacefulworld through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programs of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programs encourage student across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences can also be right.

PPS:

The students will:

Master effective communication skills.

Master the ability to monitor and assess their own performance and be responsible for expanding their physical, emotional and intellectual learning.

Demonstrate responsible citizenship through positive social interactions in various environments.

Middle Years Program

Mission Statements, cont.
history of high school requirements
History of High School Requirements
  • Legislation signed by Governor Granholm on April 20, 2006 created a set of rigorous high school requirements
  • State graduation requirements become most comprehensivein nation
  • New requirements effective Class of 2011 except for Languages other than English: 2016
successful high school programs
Successful High School Programs
  • High expectations
  • Rigorous requirements
  • Academic studies applied to real-world situations and projects
  • Challenging career/technical studies
  • Work-based learning opportunities
overview of michigan merit curriculum
Overview of Michigan Merit Curriculum

2011 Requirements (2006 8th grade class)

  • 4 English Language Arts
  • 4 Mathematics/ Math related (1 in senior year)
  • 3 Science
  • 3 Social Studies
  • 1 Physical Education/Health
  • 1 Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
  • On-line course/experience

2016 Requirements (2006 3rd grade class)

  • 2 credits/experience in Languages other than English
slide27
Who Was Involved?
  • Academic Work Groups
    • Chaired by Higher Education
    • Other representative members
      • Local and Intermediate School Districts
      • Professional Organizations
      • Career & Technical Education
  • Review Committees
  • Web Review
  • National Review
    • Achieve, Inc. – ELA and Mathematics
    • Council of State Science Supervisors
    • North American Council for Online Learning
what was developed
What Was Developed?
  • High School Content Expectations (HSCE)
    • The “universe” of recommended content during a 4 year high school experience
  • Course/Credit Content Expectations (CCE)
    • Specific course/credit content requirements derived from the “universe” of the HSCE
english language arts
English Language Arts
  • Required: 4 credits
  • Credit content is defined by units
    • 4 model units per credit
    • Anchor texts narrative/informational
    • Organized by Big Ideas
    • Increasing levels of complexity and sophistication
  • Emphasis on Reading, Writing, and Informational Text
mathematics
Mathematics
  • Required: 4 Credits
  • Credit content is developed for:
    • Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, Statistics, and Integrated Mathematics
  • Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II are required
  • Senior year of math is required – to be selected from district or online options, and/or dual enrollment
  • Sequence is not mandated
  • Legislation lists examples, list not exclusive
  • Integrated math allowed
science
Science
  • Required: 3 Credits
  • Credit content is developed for:
    • Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics
  • Biology required of everyone
  • Choice of Physics or Chemistry
  • 3rd credit to be selected from district or online options, and/or dual enrollment
  • Legislation encourages 4th credit
  • Sequence not mandated
social studies
Social Studies
  • Required: 3 credits
  • Credit content is being developed for:
    • U.S. History and Geography, Civics, Economics, and World History and Geography
  • 1 credit in U.S. History and Geography
  • .5 credit in Civics
  • .5 credit in Economics
  • 1 credit in World History and Geography
  • Anticipated approval and dissemination 2007
course credit guidelines
Course/Credit Guidelines
  • The Course/Credit Guidelines (CCG)
    • Provide high schools with general content and processes
    • Local school districts will assign credits based on their course/credit offerings that are aligned to the Course/Credit Guidelines
    • Guidelines are aligned to Michigan Curriculum Framework, Career and Technical Education Standards, and/or other program area guidelines
visual performing and applied arts
Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
  • Required: 1 credit
  • Guidelines are developed for:
    • Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
  • The goal is to provide students with experience in the entire artistic/creative process
  • Guidelines focus on artistic/creative processes rather than defining set of courses that meet guidelines
  • Credit assignment is up to local school district
physical education health
Physical Education/Health
  • Required: 1 credit
  • Guidelines are being developed for:
    • Health and Physical Education
  • Physical Education and Health requirements may be met in other course/credit areas that meet the established guidelines
online requirement
Online Requirement
  • Requirement: No credit by law requires online learning experience
  • Guidelines for this learning experience have been developed
    • Credit or non-credit course or learning experience

OR…

    • District has integrated online learning into each credit area required for graduation
  • MDE identifies basic level of technology and internet access for requirement to be in effect
languages other than english
Languages Other Than English
  • Required:
    • 2 credits in high school

OR..

    • Course work or other learning experiences prior to/during high school (K-12)
  • American Sign Language (ASL) and Heritage Languages qualify toward this requirement
  • Requirement may be met on-line
timeline for course credit content expectations and guidelines
Timeline for Course/Credit Content Expectations and Guidelines
  • Course/Credit Content Expectations and Guidelines will be presented to the State Board and made available on the MDE website on August 4, 2006:
    • English Language Arts: Units for 9th and 10th grades
    • Mathematics: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II,

Precalculus, Statistics

    • Science: Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics
    • Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
    • Online Experience
timeline for course credit content expectations and guidelines40
Timeline for Course/Credit Content Expectations and Guidelines
  • Course/Credit Content Expectations and Guidelines projected for 2007
    • Social Studies: U.S. History and Geography, Economics, Civics, World History and Geography
    • Languages other than English (LOTE): Guidelines for credit and experience
performance matters
Performance Matters

What’s New

Meet or exceed content expectations

Perform and demonstrate competency

Assign credit based on meeting expectations

What We Know

  • Currently
  • Pass or fail
  • Seat time
  • Individual courses
courses vs credits
Courses vs. Credits

Student earns credit by:

  • Successfully completing the learning expectations in the Course/Credit Content Expectations for the credit area
  • Successful completion to be determined, in part, by state or local district assessments
  • “Testing out” allowed based on earning qualifying score on state or local assessments
courses vs credits cont d
Courses vs. Credits,cont’d.
  • Graduation requirements intended to be standards/competency-based
  • Requirements do not imply courses, seat time, Carnegie Units
  • Legislation says districts may offer credits through “alternate methods” (e.g. Humanities, CTE, Industrial Technology, Voc-Ed, or combination)
courses vs credits cont d44
Courses vs. Credits,cont’d.
  • Credit requirement can be met in variety of ways and in other courses
    • Career Technical Education
    • Community based learning
    • Independent study/project work
  • High school credit may be earned for high school level courses taken prior to high school
courses vs credits cont d45
Courses vs. Credits,cont’d.
  • Legislation does not prohibit student satisfying credit requirements through:
    • Dual enrollment
    • Advanced Placement
    • International Baccalaureate
    • Other “early college” experiences or programs
michigan merit curriculum assessments
Michigan Merit Curriculum Assessments
  • Local districts may use own assessments to measure achievement in credits
  • New law authorizes local district to institute Michigan Merit Exam (MME) as graduation requirement
personal curriculum
Personal Curriculum
  • Must meet high school requirements except as designated by law
  • Graduation requirements may be modified through the “Personal Curriculum”
personal curriculum48
Personal Curriculum
  • Developed by team comprised of: the student, parent/guardian, high school counselor or staff member designated by principal
  • No age or grade level specified
  • Should incorporate as much of graduation requirements as practicable
personal curriculum cont d
Personal Curriculum,cont’d.
  • Shall include measurable goals and evaluation
  • Aligned with student’s Educational Development Plan (EDP from 7th grade)
  • Final plan must be approved by parents and district superintendent
  • Parents must communicate with teachers once each quarter to assess progress
special education
Special Education
  • All graduation requirements apply
  • Student’s IEP supports the student to achieve graduation
  • The IEP must identify the appropriate supports to successfully complete the Michigan Merit Curriculum or through a Personal Curriculum
school accreditation
School Accreditation
  • State accreditation of high schools dependent upon schools providing opportunities to meet all graduation requirements
  • Beginning 2008-09 school year, no high school will be accredited unless such opportunities are provided
  • Law provides for consequences for schools failing to be accredited for 3 consecutive years
mde obligations
MDE Obligations
  • Develop Course/Credit Content Expectations for subject areas named in legislation
  • Develop guidelines for:
    • PE/Health
    • Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
    • Online Learning Experience
    • Languages other than English (experiences K-12)
  • Alternative delivery methods
  • District phase-in requirements
mde obligations cont d
MDE Obligations,cont’d.
  • Within 3 years developor select and approve assessments that may be used by the district for the Course/Credit requirements (at a minimum) in:
    • English Language Arts
    • Mathematics
    • Science
    • Social Studies
  • Develop guidelines for applications for “specialty schools”
district obligations
District Obligations
  • Opportunities in place by 2007-08 school year to meet all graduation requirements
  • If not, proposal for phase-in plan
  • Educational Development Plan for 7th graders to be completed by time student enters high school- if requested
district obligations cont d
District Obligations,cont’d.
  • Graduation credit areas taught by “highly qualified” (NCLB) teachers
  • Notice to parents of students failing or in danger of dropping out
  • Basic technology and internet access in place to support on-line requirement
find information on web
Find Information on Web

Michigan.gov/highschool (with link to HSCE site)

http://www.michigan.gov/highschool

Michigan.gov/hsce

http://www.michigan.gov/hsce

Michigan.gov/oeaa (MME/ACT information)

http://michigan.gov/oeaa

Michigan.gov/mathematics (mathematics resources)

http://www.michigan.gov/mathematics

ACT.org (policy makers) On Course for Success

http://www.act.org/path/policy/pdf/success_report.pdf

ACT.org (policy makers) Reading Between the Lines

http://www.act.org/path/policy/reports/reading.html

ACT.org (College Readiness Standards)

http://www.act.org/standard/index.html

mde contact information
MDE Contact Information

Jeremy M. Hughes, Ph.D.

Deputy Superintendent/Chief Academic Officer

[email protected]

Dr. Yvonne Caamal Canul, Director

Office of School Improvement

[email protected]

Betty Underwood, Assistant Director

Office of School Improvement

[email protected]

Deborah Clemmons, Supervisor

Office of School Improvement

[email protected]

ad