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Global Warming – Effects on the Health of our Planet

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  1. Global Warming – Effects on the Health of our Planet Susan Kratochvil, MPH Student Walden University PUBH 6165-1 Instructor: Dr. Rebecca Heick Winter Quarter, 2010 Source: www.globalwarming.com

  2. What is Global Warming? A premise that the environment is increasing in overall air and water temperature. If this trend is not interrupted or challenged, life on earth will be dynamically effected. A quantifiable set of environmental results that are in addition to any normal changes in climate. The effects of global warming can be catastrophic. Industrial growth has negatively effected our environment by a cycle of harmful processes that can increase the damage to our ecosystem. Reference: Global Warming (2009). What is global warming? Retrieved on January 16 from http://www.globalwarming.com/2009/03/what-is-global-warming?

  3. What is the most significant cause of global warming? The primary cause of global warming is Carbon Dioxide emissions. Eight billion tons of CO2 entered the air last year. Currently 40 percent of all CO2 emissions are caused by power plants. These burn coal, natural gas and diesel fuel. 33 percent of all CO2 is the product of cars and trucks with internal combustion engines burning fossil fuels. 3.5 percent of CO2 emissions are released from aircraft. Jets and other aircraft deliver their pollutants directly into the troposphere. Reference: Global Warming (2009). What is the most significant cause of global warming? Retrieved on January 10, 2010 from http://globalwarming.com/2009/03/what-is-the-most-signficant-cause-of-global-warming.

  4. What is the Greenhouse Effect? The greenhouse effect is what happens when heat is trapped and then increases as more heat radiation is added. It occurs when solar radiation bounces off or is radiated from the earth. Instead of passing through our atmosphere and into space, it is absorbed by extraneous gases and particles. These gases absorb heat and radiate it in all directions, including the surface of the earth. The process repeats itself, until we have a global version of a car with the windows rolled up parked in the noonday sun. Reference: Global Warming (2009). The greenhouse effect. Retrieved on January 15, 2010 from http://globalwarming.com/2009/03/the-greenhouse-effect.

  5. Health Effects of Global Warming In 1861, natural philosopher John Tyndall predicted that emissions of carbon dioxide would trap the radiative energy of the sun within the earth’s atmosphere and raise surface temperatures. Recent data of several international consortia show global warming is accelerating at a rate far greater than predicted a century ago, due in large part to combustion of fossil fuels. Global warming has emerged as a public health challenge requiring serious, concerted action. The health care community can advocate policies that wean us from fossil fuels and mitigate the extent of human-induced climate change. Reference: Staropoli, J. (2002). The public health implications of global warming. JAMA, 287(17). Retrieved on January 19, 2010 from www.jama.com.

  6. Health Effects of Global Warming Epidemiologists are looking at the potential influence of global warming and other climate changes on human health. Research has shown evidence of a link between climate and microbial foodborne illnesses, including salmonella food poisoning. Links have been foundbetween latitudinal gradients in the amount of foodborne and diarrheal illnesses, changing disease patterns during El Nino warmings, and connections between weather disturbances and waterborne and foodborne illnesses. Reference: Hampton, T. (2006). Researchers study health effects of environmental change, JAMA, 296(8), 913-914.

  7. Health Effects of Global Warming Researchers predict a 16 to 28 percent increase in person-months of exposure to malaria in Africa by 2100. Studies estimate that future heat waves in Europe and North America will become more intense, more frequent, and longer lasting in the second half of the 21st century. The population has exceed the earth’s carrying capacity, resulting in a whole range of problems including: Global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, extinction of species, fresh water shortages. Reference: McMichael, AJ (2006). Researchers study health effects of environmental change. Medical News & Perspectives, American Medical Association. JAMA, 296(8), 913-920.

  8. What Can We Do About Global Warming? Renewable energy standards To ensure healthy air and a stable climate for our children and grandchildren, we must make responsible decisions about our energy sources. Practical solutions Renewable electricity standards have been enacted in 28 states and the District of Columbia. This commitment will have a significant impact on CO2 emissions. By 2025, state standards will reduce total CO2 emissions by more than 183 million metric tons (MMT), the equivalent of taking 30 million cars off the road or planting a forest large enough to cover the state of Washington. Reference: Union of Concerned Scientists, 2009. Renewable energy standards – mitigating global warning. Retrieved on January 15, 2010 from www.ucusa.org.

  9. National Electricity Standards Greater benefits could be achieved if Congress adopted a national standard for renewable electricity. The 20 percent national standard could reduce growth in CO2 emissions from power plants by 63 percent by the year 2020. This is equivalent to taking 36.4 million cars off the road. The U.S. is only five percent of the world’s population, and produces nearly 25 percent of annual global heat-trapping emissions. Electricity generation accounts for one-third of these emissions. Renewable electricity standards offers an affordable climate solution with a proven track record. Reference: Union of Concerned Scientists (2009). Renewable energy standards – mitigating global warming. Retrieved on January 19, 2010 from http://www.ucusa.org.

  10. Challenges for Climate Change and Health Challenges for future climate change and effects on health include: Climate change science Temperature-related morbidity and mortality Health effects of extreme weather events Water-related infectious diseases Sea-level rise Reference: Patz, R. & Khaliq, M., 2002. Global climate change and health:Challenges for future practitioners. JAMA, 287(17), 2283-2284.

  11. Resources for Further Reference • Watch this YouTube video of Global Warming 101: http://globalwarming.com/2009/03/what-is-global-warming/. • Read books about Global Warming available at http://www.grinningplanet.com/environmental-books/global-warming-books.htm. • Books and research reports on Global Warming can be found on http://www.billmckibben.com/fightglobalwarmingnow/global-warming-resources.html.

  12. References • Global Warming (2009). What is global warming? Retrieved on January 16 from http://www.globalwarming.com/2009/03/what-is-global-warming? • Global Warming (2009). What is the most significant cause of global warming? Retrieved on January 10, 2010 from http://globalwarming.com/2009/03/what-is-the-most-signficant-cause-of-global-warming. • Global Warming (2009). The greenhouse effect. Retrieved on January 15, 2010 from http://globalwarming.com/2009/03/the-greenhouse-effect. • Hampton, T. (2006). Researchers study health effects of environmental change, JAMA, 296(8), 913-914. • McMichael, AJ (2006). Researchers study health effects of environmental change. Medical News & Perspectives, American Medical Association. JAMA, 296(8), 913-920.

  13. References, Continued • Patz, R. & Khaliq, M., 2002. Global climate change and health: Challenges for future practitioners. JAMA, 287(17), 2283-2284. • Staropoli, J. (2002). The public health implications of global warming. JAMA, 287(17). Retrieved on January 19, 2010 from www.jama.com. • Union of Concerned Scientists, 2009. Renewable energy standards – mitigating global warning. Retrieved on January 15, 2010 from www.ucusa.org.