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AIMS and OBJECTIVES. TO BUILD A SIMPLE PowerPoint PRESENTATION. To encourage its use in the classroom. THE CONTENT OF SLIDES TO OUTLINE A MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO DESIGNING AND REPORT WRITING.

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AIMS and OBJECTIVES


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    1. AIMS and OBJECTIVES TO BUILD A SIMPLE PowerPoint PRESENTATION. To encourage its use in the classroom. THE CONTENT OF SLIDES TO OUTLINE A MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO DESIGNING AND REPORT WRITING. SLIDES MAY BE USED AS BOTH A LEARNING RESOURCE FOR STUDENTS (a self learning tool) AND A TEACHING AID FOR TEACHERS. Presented by P.Byrne

    2. FOLDERS, REPORTS and FOLIO WRITING FORTECHNOLOGICAL SUBJECTS: • Front cover to include subject, level and year. • Contents page • Design loop. • Analysis of Brief. • Investigation of solutions • Design Solution. • Criteria for selection of solution. • Production and Drawings / Plans. • Testing and Evaluation • Neat Presentation.

    3. Analysing of Brief: Tease out and expand on given Brief, specify requested requirements but also include new requirements particular to the individual item under design. What has it to do What has it to look like. Other requirements. Individuals own creative input. Break down Brief. Support the brief.

    4. DESIGN LOOP: Design Brief Test Specification Modify Make Research Drawings Ideas Review Model

    5. Common Errors: • (Folders) • Students include unnecessary details such as the theoretical descriptions of common workshop tools. • Downloaded information from Internet without any attempt at analysis. • No need for long descriptions of processes used. • No worthwhile analysis of brief. • No investigations of possible solutions. • No planning. No reasons given for selection.

    6. Common Errors. Continued. • Final design appears without any evidence of any process of thought. • No testing with honest results. • No evaluation. • Poor overall presentation of booklet. • Drawings to a poor standard. • No working drawings with dimensions.

    7. WHY A DESIGN FOLDER • COMMUNICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS. • Ideas must be researched, developed, tested,modeled, modified and recorded before the right solution is found. • A large percentage of final mark is allocated to the folder • A management structure, record of activities.

    8. MAKING THE FOLDER. • PORTRAIT OR LANDSCAPE • METHOD OF BINDING • SKETCHES • DTP or Word processing. • CAD. • Page Titles.

    9. PROJECT DEVELOPMENT • Try to think of as many ideas as you can • Do not just develop your first idea. • Try to think of at least three ideas • Outline three advantages and three disadvantages for each. • Record all ideas (write + sketch) and develop them further by sketches.

    10. Technological Factors. • Appropriate materials • Suitable construction. • Durability: to withstand use. • Cost. • Form and function. • Function no longer rules over form.

    11. ARTISTIC FACTORS. • Taste is influenced: • upbringing, personal environment. • Exposure to various media, • advertising, TV, magazines. • Fashion.

    12. APPEARANCE Good proportions. Strength / weight ratio. Colour. Feel / Touch. Finish. Quality of Material Shape / Sturdiness.

    13. INVESTIGATION: Make a list of all things you feel the product should have. BRAINSTORM WHAT MUST THE PRODUCT DO OR HAVE? RESEARCH TYPES ALREADY AVAILABLE Establish their positive factors. Find out everything you can about each factor.

    14. ANALYSIS • What will it do? • Where will it be used? • Who will use it? • When will it be used? • Why will it be used? • How will it affect people using it? • What must it demonstrate? Scatter or bubble chart.

    15. DESIGN SPECIFICATION: LIST OF WHAT THE FINAL PRODUCT MUST DO OR HAVE. • The list or spec. is derived from: • The Brief. * Weight / strength ratios. • Investigations. * Constraints.( Limits of size) • Research * Environmental factors • Dimensional limitations. *Visibility. • Aesthetics. *Maintenance needs. ANALYSIS

    16. THE SPECIFICATION: LIST OF FACTORS: WHAT THE PRODUCT MUST DO OR HAVE. RESEARCH HOW BEST YOU CAN CREATE THESE FACTORS FROM MEANS ALREADY AVAILABLE. ANALYSIS OF THESE FACTORS: FINAL SPECIFICATION: COMMON TO ALL DESIGNS SPECIFIC TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL DESIGN.

    17. COMMON TO ALL SPECS: • Safety. • Finish. • Quality. • Appearance. • Maintenance. • Ergonomics. • Service Life. • Cost. • Constraints requested.

    18. Technological Subjects. • Engineering. • Construction Studies • Materials Technology (Wood) • Technology

    19. GATHERING INFORMATION • Experimentation: weighing, lifting,measuring data. (identify aims and collect results) • Surveys: people expectations, popularity of products. • Reading. • Internet: Make sure analysis is carried out. • Contact manufacturing companies.

    20. CONCEPT SKETCHES. IDEA SHEETS (Explore possibilities and develop ideas) PRODUCTS ALREADY EXISTING. FINDING IDEAS:

    21. COMMUNICATING IDEAS • Written information. • Diagrams • Sketches • Drawings. • Computer graphics • Desk Top Publishing. • Models and Prototypes. • Digital images.

    22. MODELS or PROTOTYPES • Cardboard, cereal boxes, matches, straws. • Styrofoam. • Modelling woods: Balsa or Jelutong are good for prototype building. • No material to be cut without appropriate approved model. (Teacher Intervention).

    23. DEVELOPMENT OF IDEAS. CARDBOARD MOCK UPS. Consult with Teacher. REFLECT AND REVIEW. MECHANICAL MOVEMENT. ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT DESIGNS DECIDE, RECHECK BRIEF AND SPECIFICATION SKETCH AND REVIEW.

    24. FROM FINAL PROTOTYPE: CONSULTATION WITH TEACHER. WORKING DRAWINGS. CUTTING LIST. ALTERATIONS. MANUFACTURE ALTERATIONS ADJUST WORKING DRAWINGS MODIFICATIONS (FINAL). DRAWINGS

    25. REASONS FOR SELECTIONOFDESIGNSOLUTION: CRITERIA

    26. Oooh, it could work better if ! Check if change is really necessary? Is it a sensible change? Is there enough time to change? Consult Teacher.

    27. FINAL EVALUATION • How it compares to original intention; • Does it solve the original problem; • What it looks like; • How well it operates; • Manufacturing cost; • How it could be improved. • Safety!

    28. REMEMBER EVEN THE BEST PRODUCT CAN BE IMPROVED.

    29. PROJECT HAZING DUE TO EXCESSIVE USE OF ADHESIVES POOR STRENGTH / WEIGHT RATIOS POOR ATTENTION TO SAFETY NO ACCESS FOR MAINTENANCE / REPLACEMENT. UNNECESSARY RECYLING. DIMENSIONAL LIMIT AND CONSTRAINTS NOT OBSERVED. UNTIDY CIRCUITS / POOR CONNECTIONS.

    30. PROJECT POOR STABILITY. POOR BALANCE. POOR PROPORTIONS (Length to width) POOR FINISH ON INDIVIDUAL PARTS (Quality of Work) OVERALL APPEARANCE POOR. Low level of Skills applied. Material used too heavy, too flexible, Opaque. Body too heavy for selected drive. Light fixings where more robust were needed. Heavy screws holding light material.

    31. CONCLUSIONS A TIME plan is necessary. Sketches, scribbles, scatter charts lead to solutions. Discuss with your TEACHER (regularly). Simplicity is often most effective. No prototype No make. Test any circuits on breadboards firstly. Neatness and care pay.