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Final Teachings and Actions of Jesus

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  1. Acts 1 Consequent Activities of the Apostles and Brethren Final Teachings and Actions of Jesus Cause Effect 1:1 1:11 1:12 1:26 Teachings and Actions During 40 Days (linked w. “first book”) Teachings and Actions on Day of Ascension Common Prayer Common decision: Replacement for Judas 1 5 6 11 12 14 15 26

  2. Structural/Logical Relationships: • 1. Causation - Teachings and actions Consequent activities of of Jesus (Cause) apostles and brethren (Effect) • 2. Recurrence - (1) Holy Spirit (vv.2,5,8,16) • (2) Apostle, apostleship/ministry (vv.2,[3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 10,11,12,13,14,] 17,25,26) • (3) Jerusalem (vv. 4,8,12,19)

  3. Structural/Logical Relationships: 3. Contrast The Apostles and Brethren vs. (passim, esp. vv.12-26) Judas 4. Preparation/Realization 1:12-14- The Setting - Common Prayer 1:15-26- Decision regarding successor to Judas

  4. Activities of the Apostles and Brethren (1:12-26) Common Prayer (1:12-14) 1. Return - Jerusalem 2. Location - Upper Room 3. Persons - Apostles (with women and brothers - Jesus) 4. Manner of Behavior Common Decision (1:15-26) - Completion of Apostolic Circle (to 120) One accord Devoted themselves- prayer Preparation: Prayer Realization: Common Decision

  5. Common Decision (1:15-26) - Completion of apostle circle (to 120) 1. Speech of Peter (1:15-22) - Double necessity a. Necessity (e;dei) of fulfillment of scripture re. Judas’ demise (1:16-20a) Event: Judas’ Demise 1:16-19 1:20a (Ps 69.25) Scripture 1:20b (PS 109.8) Event: Judas’ Replacement 1:21-22 b. Necessity (dei) of replacing Judas - Office (1:20b-22) Nomination 2. Consequent action (1:23-26) Prayer Selection

  6. They all joined together constantly in prayer (1:14) • Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • proskarterou/ntejo`moqumado.nth/| proseuch/| • o`moqumado.nthe adverb “homothumadon” is unique to Luke in the NT and is one of his favorite expression for spiritual unity (see 2:46; 4:24; 5:12; 8:6; 15:25) • proseuchPrayer is a theme spanning for both volumes of Luke-Acts. Luke 3:21; 5:16; 6:12; 9:28-29; 11:1-4; 18:1; 22:41-44, 46; Acts 1:24-25; 4:24-30; 6:6; 8:15; 9:11, 40; 10:9, 30; 12:12; 13:3; 14:23; 16:25; 20:36; 21:5; 28:8) • Jesus characterizes the Apostles/disciples in prayer in excess of 30 x’s in the Book of Acts. Contrast that to the Book of Luke, where they are never said to pray (even after Jesus’ instruction in 11:1-13)

  7. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • Prayer as Discipleship Characteristic • At several points in Acts, the disciples pray without reference to the content of that prayer. • Prayer is identified as the means by which God’s plans are revealed and people align themselves with God’s plans • This summary prayer (1:14) is closely tied to the coming of the Holy Spirit in 2:1ff. This suggests that prayer is a faithful waiting for the anticipated Holy Spirit (see echo of Jesus words in Luke 11:1-13, a God who gives graciously)

  8. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • 2. Prayer as Selection of Leaders • Judas’ defection from his appointed place among the Twelve demonstrates that God’s Will can be opposed. Thus, the divine will invites human partnership. Prayer is then put forward as one of the ways in which God’s Will is make known! • If the Lord “knows the heart” (1:24), then He has already chosen Judas’ replacement (see the choosing of the apostles in Luke 6:12-16, Acts 1:2). If God is omniscient, then why not ask for guidance? What about casting Lots? Compare Zechariah in the temple (Luke 1:8-9). If Zechariah is not arbitrary, will Matthias be?

  9. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • 2. Prayer as Selection of Leaders (continued) • First recorded prayer in Acts 1:24-25: “Lord, you know everyone’s heart. Show us (literally: appoint for us; see Luke 10:1) which of these two you have chosen (see Luke 6:13; 9:35; 10:42; 14:7; Acts 1:2, 24; 6:5; 13:17; 15:7, 22, 25) to take over this apostolic ministry, which Judas left to go where he belongs.” • Collective prayer acknowledges God’s continuing role in the progress of history. • Collective prayer acknowledges the early church’s commitment to putting the divine will into action

  10. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • 3. Prayer in the face of Persecution • In Luke, Jesus predicted his followers would encounter hostility (Luke 6:22-23; 10:1-16; 12:4-10; 21:12-19; 22:35-38) • Yet he does not promise rescue. • Thus, listen to the prayers of the disciples in 4:24-31; 7:59-60; 12:5, 12; 16:25). They do not pray for rescue, deliverance, etc., but for boldness for the continuation of the church’s mission.

  11. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • 3. Prayer in the face of Persecution (continued) • Especially the prayer of 4:23-31 is programmatic for the book as a whole • It explains how the church read its own experience of opposition against the backdrop of the hostility Jesus encountered. • It is crucial to observe that the prayer offered not for the ceasing of threats but that God would protect his redemptive goals.

  12. Meaning of “Prayer” in Acts 1:14 • 4. Prayer for Salvation • In a sense according to Acts, salvation is always related to prayer, since salvation comes to “all who call upon the name of the Lord (Acts 2:21) • In a sense, this includes those persons who believe in the name and have identified with the name of Jesus in baptism (2:38; 3:16; 8:12, 16; 9:48; 19:5; 22:16) • In a sense, Luke indicates how fundamental prayer is to the Christian experience – it’s the beginning of one’s inclusion within the new community.

  13. Ways in Which 1:1-5 Introduces the Book of Acts: 1. Indicates the recipient, or addressee (at least in part) 2. Indicates its relationship to the Gospel of Luke, a relationship that involves both continuity and discontinuity 3. Indicates the relationship of the events in Acts to the events of the Gospel, i.e., affirms that what is to be narrated is a continuation of the work of Christ that is described in the Gospel. Here in Acts, as in the Gospel, the dynamic power that brings salvation and wholeness to persons involves the cooperation of Jesus and the Holy Spirit. 4. Indicates the nature and importance of the resurrection of Jesus, as well as the historical and authenticating basis for the witness to the resurrection, so important in Acts.

  14. Ways in Which 1:1-5 Introduces the Book of Acts: 5. Indicates the nature and basis of apostolic authority - a key concern in the Book of Acts. 6. Indicates the importance and necessity of waiting for the gift of the Holy Spirit 7. Indicates the character of the gift of the Holy Spirit: Comes as the result of promise (the promise of God through Jesus).

  15. Ways in Which 1:1-5 Introduces the Book of Acts: • Indicates the continuity of the church with Israel: Both Israel and the church are instructed people; Both Israel and the church are evangelistic people (i.e., salvation - bringing people). • Note reference to holy time (“40 days” - of instruction) • Note reference to holy space (“Jerusalem” - as the place from which salvation is to be proclaimed to the whole earth). • Indicates the nature of the Christian existence Historical activity in the past – (baptism of John) Forthcoming salvation – (baptism of Holy Spirit)