lit127 mythology folk literature july 12 2012 new historicism n.
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Lit127: Mythology & Folk Literature July 12, 2012 New Historicism. New Historicism is a school of literary theory, grounded in critical theory, that developed in the 1980s, primarily through the work of the critic Stephen Greenblatt, and gained widespread influence in the 1990s .

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New Historicism is a school of literary theory, grounded in critical theory, that developed in the 1980s, primarily through the work of the critic Stephen Greenblatt, and gained widespread influence in the 1990s.

New Historicists aim simultaneously to understand the work through its historical context and to understand cultural and intellectual history through literature, which documents the new discipline of the history of ideas.

lord of the rings
Lord of the Rings
  • Books written from 1937-49
  • Became popular in the 1950s-60s
  • Adapted into film 2001-3
the ring of power
The Ring of Power
  • 1330 Sir Degare (Auch.) 8 in W. H. French & C. B. Hale Middle Eng. Metrical Romances (1930) 288: In LitelBretaygne was a kyng Of gretpoer in alle thing, Stif in armesvndersscheld.
  • 1938 R. J. SONTAG Germany & Eng. I. iv. 88 This was contempt for British statesmen and the British army; but not for the potential power of the British Empire.
  • 1992Utne Reader Mar.-Apr. 122/3 (advt.) The Greens: What they believe, their prospects in the U.S., and what if they achieved power?
principles of new historicism
Principles of New Historicism

1. Every expressive act is embedded in a network of material practices.

principles of new historicism1
Principles of New Historicism

2. Every act of unmasking, critique and opposition uses the tools it condemns and risks falling prey to the practice it exposes.

principles of new historicism2
Principles of New Historicism

3. Literary and non-literary "texts" circulate inseparably.

principles of new historicism3
Principles of New Historicism

4. No discourse, imaginative or archival, gives access to unchanging truths, nor expresses inalterable human nature;

principles of new historicism4
Principles of New Historicism

5. Critical method and a language adequate to describe culture under capitalism participate in the economy they describe.

case study gilgamesh
Case Study: Gilgamesh

When?

2500 B.C.

case study gilgamesh1
Case Study: Gilgamesh

Where?

Sumeria

Babylonian culture

Modern day Iraq

case study gilgamesh2
Case Study: Gilgamesh

Who?

Fifth king of Uruk

Said to have reigned for 126 years

Also said described as 2/3 god, 1/3 human

case study gilgamesh3
Case Study: Gilgamesh

What?

Urukprobably had 50,000–80,000 residents living in 6 km2 of walled area; making it the largest city in the world at the time

This period of 800 years saw a shift from small, agricultural villages to a larger urban center with a full-time bureaucracy, military, and stratified society. Although other settlements coexisted with Uruk, while Uruk was significantly larger and more complex. The Uruk period culture exported by Sumerian traders and colonists had an effect on all surrounding peoples, who gradually evolved their own comparable, competing economies and cultures

Droit de seigneur