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Wind Energy an Introduction

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  1. Wind Energy an Introduction • Fastest Growing Energy in the World • wind power has the potential to produce 72 Terawatts,5 times more energy than the world consumes*. • 250 MW of Wind Energy can displace 1.3 billion pounds of greenhouse gases equal to emissions of 175,000 cars or 100,000 sport utility vehicles. Also eliminate 5.9 million pounds of acid rain emissions (sulfur dioxide), 2.8 million pounds of smog emissions (nitrogen dioxide) and about 44 pounds of mercury. Sourcehttp://www.awea.org/iowawind/facts.html • Wind is part of the answer to the mounting coal shortages and raging environmental pollution in India *Source http://www.wired.com/news/images/manual/windmaps0523_1.html

  2. Wind Energy an Introduction… • Total Wind Potential of India – 45000 MW • Total Installed Capacity India – 3500 MW (Approx)

  3. Wind Energy in Open Access • Introduction • Specific Issues in Open Access • Request

  4. Specific Issues in Open Access • Access Charges are often detrimental. • Banking facility is not provided. • Compliances mandated are not sensitive to Wind

  5. High Access Charges Access Charges as per KERC Tariff Order 2003

  6. Network Costs & Tariff (ii)   BESCOM --- 10.58 paise/KWh (iii)  MESCOM --- 16.44 paise/KWh (iv)      HESCOM --- 13.35 paise/KWh (v) GESCOM --- 13.58 paise/KWh Prevailing HT 2 (a)Tariff as per 2003 Order- Demand charges Rs.180/kVA of billing demand/month Energy charges For the first 1 Lakh units 360 paise per unit For the balance units- 410 paise per unit

  7. Banking facility • Banking facility which existed for last two decades is being denied now in the name of Open Access. • Wind is not a Real-timedispatchable energy type. • Wind Availability is from May – September. • 80-85% Wind Energy produced during this period. • In order to match consumer demand-uniform across year – Banking is a must.

  8. Wind Sensitive Needs • STOA mechanism cannot be applied. • UI charged in ABT regime is highly determinant since • Normative PLF or Availability cannot be forecasted • Deviations from the Schedule cannot be controlled • Merit order cannot be applied • Wind Energy needs to tapped when available • Levy of Surcharge is highly detrimental

  9. Request • Favourable Wheeling @ 4% Banking Charges @ 2% for a long period say 10 years. • Charges be uniform with entire State as one zone. • Annual Banking facility be provided. • Exemption from ABT/Scheduling/Merit Order/Surcharge levy • Must Run Status be conferred

  10. Tariff & Parameters as provided by KERC as per NCE Tariff Order dated 18.01.2005 • Project Cost- Rs.425Lakhs/MW • PLF – 26.5% • O&M expenses - 1.25% of the project cost with annual escalation of 5%. • interest on working capital - 12.5% on two months bills. • Auxiliary Consumption – 0.5% • Tariff per unit – Rs.3.40/- freezed for 20 years

  11. Capacity Breakup of Wind Installations • Tamil Nadu –2036 MW • Karnataka – 410.7 MW • Andhra - 120.6 MW • Gujarat – 253.5 • Rajasthan- 284.8 • Maharashtra – 456.3 MW • M.P.- 28.9 MW • Kerala –2 MW • W.Bengal – 1.1. MW Source : http://windpowerindia.com/newsdetailer.html#bkmark1