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How do children get better at history? Putting progression at the heart of effective teaching and learning. Jerome Freeman GA/HA Primary Conference June 2010. Putting progression at the heart of effective teaching and learning. How do children get better at history?

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How do children get better at history?Putting progression at the heart of effective teaching and learning

Jerome Freeman

GA/HA Primary Conference June 2010

putting progression at the heart of effective teaching and learning
Putting progression at the heart of effective teaching and learning
  • How do children get better at history?
  • How can you build progression into key stage planning?
  • How can you build progression into enquiry planning?
at the seaside in the 1950s
At the seaside in the 1950s
  • Insert image of the seaside in the 1950s
at the seaside in the 1950s4
What souvenirs?

What knowledge?

Which skills?

Which concepts?

At the seaside in the 1950s
engaging the children different ways to start your enquiries
Engaging the children: different ways to start your enquiries
  • Start with a question to provide a sense of mystery or intrigue about an aspect of the past:
  • How did the Ancient Egyptians build the pyramids?
  • Why is Sutton Hoo so important?
  • What was it really like to be an evacuee in the Second World War?
  • Other questions might be used to appeal to the pupils' sense of fair play, for example:
  • Was anything done to improve the lives of Victorian children?
  • Did Mary Queen of Scots deserve to die?
  • Use some of history's wealth of resources:
  • Personal accounts, stories, pictures, film or artefacts.
engaging the children different ways to end your enquiries
Engaging the children: different ways to end your enquiries
  • In groups, children become the expert archaeologists and present their findings at an archaeological conference on Roman Britain.
  • An art exhibition on the theme of Victorian country children. Children become experts on particular pictures, giving talks to visitors and writing guides to individual paintings.
  • Children use their knowledge to plan a local history display for their local library.
  • Children write to the Hollywood producer, explaining why he should make a more balanced film about the Vikings.
  • The children produce a Today at the ancient Olympics TV news report.
how do children get better at history
How do children get better at history?
  • Progression in primary history is characterised by:
  • asking and answering more complex questions
  • using a greater depth and range of historical knowledge to provide more reasoned explanations
  • understanding more general and specific historical concepts
  • making links and connections between different areas of learning
  • growing understanding of and proficiency in the use of historical skills
  • an increasing ability to apply skills across different areas of learning
  • becoming more independent in learning.
the building blocks for progression
The building blocks for progression

Historical concepts

  • Chronology
  • Causation
  • Change
  • Features/Diversity
  • Interpretations

Historical skills

  • Enquiry
  • Using and analysing evidence
  • Presenting and communicating
a key stage plan example 1
A key stage plan: example 1
  • This plan uses the existing QCDA units as its building blocks. These are linked in various ways across the two key stages.
  • KS1 is based on periods that are taught at KS2. KS2 is ordered chronologically.
  • Each year is planned around three linked topics that focus on an historical theme.
  • Each enquiry is planned around some of the concepts and skills. 
a key stage plan part one
A key stage plan (part one)

Year 1 – Then and Now

  • What were homes like a long time ago?
  • How are our toys different from those in the past?
  • What were seaside holidays like in the past?

Year 2 – Remembering

  • What are we remembering on Remembrance Day?
  • How do we know about the Great Fire of London?
  • What were seaside holidays like in the past?
a key stage plan part two
A key stage plan (part two)

Year 3 – Daily Life

  • How do we know about Ancient Egypt?
  • What were the differences between rich and poor in Tudor times?
  • How did life change here in Victorian times?

Year 4- Powerful people

  • Why did Boudicca resist the Romans?
  • Why do we remember Henry VIII?
  • How did Brunel change Devon?
a key stage plan part three
A key stage plan (part three)

Year 5 – Young people

  • What was it like to grow up in Ancient Greece?
  • How can we know about Victorian children?
  • Could children enjoy life in World War 2?

Year 6 – Times of change

  • Why did Alfred resist the Vikings?
  • What were the effects of Tudor exploration?
  • How can we know life in Britain has changed since 1948?
a key stage plan example 114
A key stage plan: example 1

How has progression been built into

this key stage plan?

a key stage plan example 2
A key stage plan: example 2
  • In Year 3 the focus is on people's daily lives in Roman, Tudor and Victorian Britain:
  • How much can we find out about people’s daily lives in Roman Britain?
  • How well did people live in Tudor England?
  • What was life really like for Victorian country children?
  • In Year 4, children return to these periods, this time focusing on the theme of people and power:
  • How did the Romans take control of Britain?
  • What made Elizabeth I so powerful?
  • What did the great Victorians achieve?
a key stage plan example 217
A key stage plan: example 2
  • In Year 5, children study the movement and settlement of different people over time:
  • How should we remember the Vikings?
  • What surprised Tudor merchants about Mughal India?
  • What’s the story behind Victorian emigration?
  • In Year 6, children have the opportunity to study local, European and world history:
  • What mattered most to the Ancient Egyptians?
  • Why did the Olympic Games matter so much to the Ancient Greeks?
  • How has life in our locality changed in the last 150 years?
what is enquiry planning
What is 'enquiry planning'?
  • Content in history organised around an overarching enquiry question.
  • Helps to direct the learning around some historical concepts and skills.
  • The key question provides a route through the topic and can be used to maintain the pupil's interest and deepen their understanding of the subject being studied.
  • How can we find out about the Indus Valley civilisation?This requires the children to look at aspects of life in the Indus Valley but also to use their enquiry skills in doing so.
  • Why have people invaded and settled in Britain in the past? A Viking case study

This requires the children to identify and describe reasons for the Viking invasions of Britain. 

steps to building an enquiry
Steps to building an enquiry?
  • Is the chosen area of content interesting and relevant?
  • What learning in the concepts and skills will the enquiry develop?
  • How will we hook the children at the start of the enquiry?
  • How will we sequence the learning for maximum motivation?
  • Are we using rich resources?
  • How can we help children choose and use information?
  • How will the children communicate their understanding through an engaging end product?
  • How does this enquiry fit into the key stage plan?
linking enquiry to progression
Enquiry question stem:

What was it like in/for ...?

How did life change...?

Why did ...?

Does ...tell us the truth about ...?

What was it like ...?

How do we know ...?

Link to concepts & skills:

Features/diversity

Change

Causation

Interpretations

Enquiry

Evidence

Linking enquiry to progression