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Accessing Data Collected by the Census Bureau. THURSDAY, April 26, 2012 . Quick Review. 2010 decennial data is “short-form” only – limited demographic characteristics; ACS now source of “long-form” type of data Census Data released in two “flavors” – Aggregate data Microdata

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slide2

Quick Review

2010 decennial data is “short-form” only – limited demographic characteristics; ACS now source of “long-form” type of data

Census Data released in two “flavors” –

Aggregate data

Microdata

A third type of data product identifies geographic boundaries

Aggregate data released in a variety of products, differing in content, geographic specificity and temporal coverage

Microdata has flexibility of individual level information, but balances this by only gross geographic detail

slide3

Access and Resources

Aggregate data resources

Microdata resources

Geography resources

Local resources

slide4

Access and Resources

Aggregate resources:

American Factfinder 2, Social Explorer, DataFerrett, Uexplore/Dexter, NHGIS, Historical Census Browser,

Geolytics NCDB

Microdata resources

Online Analysis: SDA & IPUMS

Extract/Download: IPUMS, ICPSR, NBER, DataFerrett, Census, Unicon

Restricted Use: California Census Research Data Center

Geographic: Census, MABLE/Geocorr, IPUMS, NHGIS

Documentation: IPUMS, AFF2, ICPSR

Visualization: Social Explorer, Historical Census Browser, AFF2

Local Resources: DOF/DRU, SDCs, UC DATA, DataLab, CCRDC

slide6

Just When You

thought it

was safe…..

American

Factfinder II

slide7

The “new”

American Factfinder

data search strategy
Data Search Strategy
  • Specification act as a “sieve” – eliminating non-conforming tables, data, geographies, etc.
  • So…. Pick your most limiting conditions first.
    • Need very detailed geography? Pick that first.
    • Know your base dataset? Pick that early.
    • Need data for 2010? Limit your search from the start
  • Think about “bookmarking” for geographies or items you’ll return to
slide13

Alternative to AFF:

FTP Full Files

slide14

AFF 2:

Deep Linking

deep linking in aff2
Deep Linking in AFF2
  • http://factfinder2.census.gov/legacy/AFF_deep_linking_guide.pdf
  • factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/version/lang

/program/dataset/product

[/geo_id[|geo_id]*][/codetype~code[|code]*]*

slide18

Same FTP

Options for

ACS

slide23

Historical Census

Data Browser

example class assignment
Example: Class Assignment
  • Describe, in broad terms, the demographics of the Fruitvale community. Population size, SES, race, ethnicity, nativity, age, education, occupation, etc.. Over time?
  • Questions.
    • What is Fruitvale? A place? A CDP? A neighborhood?
    • How will we define our geography? Does this limit anything?
    • What data sets are available for evaluation?
    • What data items do we want?
slide25

http://www.acphd.org/media/53462/fruitvale.pdf

Tracts 4061-4063, 4065-4066, 4070-4072

deep linking approach28
Deep Linking approach
  • http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en

/ACS/10_5YR/B01001A

/1400000US06001406100

|1400000US06001406201|1400000US06001406202

|1400000US06001406300|1400000US06001406400

|1400000US06001406500|1400000US06001406601

|1400000US06001406602|1400000US06001407000

|1400000US06001407101|1400000US06001407102

|1400000US06001407200

slide32

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Samples

www.ipums.org at the Minnesota Population Center

IPUMS-USAHarmonized data on people in the U.S. census and American Community Survey, from 1850 to the present.

IPUMS-CPSHarmonized data on people in the Current Population Survey, every March from 1962 to the present

Important!

Harmonized: Questions asked change over time: How to make data comparable?

Integrated: Multiple data collections & surveys simultaneously available

Microdata: The underlying individual-level data is available, not just pre-defined tables.

slide33

The American Community Survey and

the Current Population Survey

CPS – Long-running monthly survey (dating back to the 1940’s) focused on labor force characteristics (unemployment, earnings, hours worked).

~ 55,000 sample HH’s, multiple interviews, personal

In addition to the basic monthly questions, additional modules are “piggy-backed” onto the survey to provide more depth on particular topics. Most widely used supplement is the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) - aka Annual Demographic Survey or the March Files. (~100,000 HH’s)

In-depth survey – lots of detail about sources of income, work, occupational, hours, etc. (as well as core demographic information on race/ethnicity, nativity, age, sex, educataion)

slide34

The American Community Survey and

the Current Population Survey

ACS – “New” continuous survey, replaces the long form of the decennial census, first fully implemented in 2005 (non-institutionalized) and 2006 (institutionalized).

~ 2,000,000 HH’s annually, mixed mail-in/personal interviews

Substantial overlapping content with CPS

Broader range of content, somewhat less detail

Larger sample sizes allow for greater geographic detail

slide35

The American Community Survey and

the Current Population Survey

Microdata

vs.

Aggregate

slide36

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Samples

www.ipums.org at the Minnesota Population Center

Strengths:

Tremendous centralized documentation

Many “value-added” data items

Wonderful extraction engine (if downloading data)

Multiple statistical Packages supported

Online Analysis also possible

slide38

The Basics of SDA

  • What is SDA?
  • What can you do with SDA?
  • The parts of the SDA interface
  • Menu
  • Variable List
  • Active variables
  • Analysis Specification
slide39

Part II. Working with SDA

1.Parts of the SDA interface

2.Finding data/variables/subjects

- search

- documentation

3. Analysis -

Components - rows, columns, selection, controls

Procedures - crosstabs, means, correlations

4. Aids in Analysis

Recoding

Saving new variables

Downloading

slide40

The Basics of SDA

What is SDA?

SDA (Survey Documentation and Analysis) is a set of programs for the documentation and Web-based analysisof survey data.

It was developed and is maintained by the Computer-assisted Survey Methods Program (CSM) at UC Berkeley.

It was developed as a companion program with CASES (Computer Assisted Survey Execution Program), a package for collecting survey data based on structured questionnaires, using a variety of modes of data collection.

It operates on a transposed file structure, which makes analysis of datasets, especially large datasets, extremely fast.

slide41

Part I. The Basics of SDA

What is SDA?

SDA (Survey Documentation and Analysis) is a set of programs for the documentation and Web-based analysisof survey data.

It was developed and is maintained by the Computer-assisted Survey Methods Program (CSM) at UC Berkeley.

It was developed as a companion program with CASES (Computer Assisted Survey Execution Program), a package for collecting survey data based on structured questionnaires, using a variety of modes of data collection.

It operates on a transposed file structure, which makes analysis of datasets, especially large datasets, extremely fast.

slide42

Part I. The Basics of SDA

  • What data is available in SDA?
  • LOTS!
  • Many popular social science datasets (e.g. the GSS, the ANES, the PUMS from the Decennial Census, the ACS, the CPS Annual Demographic Files,…… can be found in SDA format.
  • Many archives (ICPSR, IPUMS, CPANDA, Roper, SDA, UCDATA….) provide at least some of their holdings in SDA format.
slide43

Multiple Census Samples at IPUMS (http://usa.ipums.org/usa/sda/)

slide44

And CPS (March files) data, as well (http://cps.ipums.org/cps/sda/)

slide45

The Basics of SDA

  • What can you do with SDA?
  • SDA can be used to:
  • learn about a dataset (metadata, paradata)
  • search for variables of interest
  • investigate sample sizes and variable distributions
  • perform statistical analyses
  • transform, manipulate and create variables for each unit
  • extract and download subsets or full datasets
slide46

Part I. The Basics of SDA

  • The four parts of the SDA interface
  • Action Menu
  • Variable List
  • Active Variable
  • Analysis Specification
slide52

2. Finding data/variables/subjects

Online SDA codebook

IPUMS detailed documentation

slide53

Working with SDA

Analysis –

Components - rows, columns, selection, controls

Procedures -crosstabs, means, correlations

Screens will vary depending upon what procedure you are using.

Start with exploratory – frequencies, cross-tabulations

slide54

The variables you are interested in

Who to include in the table

slide56

Part II. Working with SDA

Aids in Analysis

Recoding

Saving new variables

Downloading

slide57

Recoding variables – on the fly

Can be used in row, column, control (Crosstabs)

age (5-18)Selects, but does not collapse

age (r: 5-18) Selects AND Collapses

age (d: 5-18) Collapses, but does not select

age (c:13,5) Collapses into categories of width w

age (c:st,w) starting with value st

Recoding variables

– Web interface

slide58

Question 1: Use the CPS or ACS?

Question 2: What is the desired level of analysis (person, family, household)?

Question 3: Who should be excluded?

(How to limit to family households, or only

particular age groups, or….?

slide70

Selected Data Resources at Berkeley

  • Library Data Lab
  • http://sunsite3.berkeley.edu/wikis/datalab/
  • SDA (Survey Documentation & Analysis)
  • http://sda.berkeley.edu/
  • Statewide Database
  • http://swdb.berkeley.edu/
  • California Census Research Data Center
  • http://www.ccrdc.ucla.edu/
  • The Econometrics lab
  • http://emlab.berkeley.edu/data2.shtml
  • Thomas J. Long Business & Economics Library
    • http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/BUSI/electres.html
questions comments
Questions/Comments

email me at: jons@berkeley.edu

http://ucdata.berkeley.edu