siop training for cleveland county day 2 7 22 2010 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
SIOP Training for Cleveland County Day 2 7/22/2010 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
SIOP Training for Cleveland County Day 2 7/22/2010

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 55

SIOP Training for Cleveland County Day 2 7/22/2010 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 137 Views
  • Uploaded on

SIOP Training for Cleveland County Day 2 7/22/2010. Leticia M. Trower. Let’s Plan!. Complete the planning worksheet for Building Background: Key Vocabulary Links to background experiences Links to past learning Building background from scratch. Content Objectives. You will be able to…

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'SIOP Training for Cleveland County Day 2 7/22/2010' - bran


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
let s plan
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Plan!
  • Complete the planning worksheet for Building Background:
    • Key Vocabulary
    • Links to background experiences
    • Links to past learning
    • Building background from scratch
content objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionContent Objectives

You will be able to…

  • List various techniques for making content concepts clear to your students
  • Create two or three higher-order thinking questions to include in a lesson plan you are writing
  • Identify ways to increase interaction in your classroom
language objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLanguage Objectives

You will be able to…

  • Write a lesson plan that includes features of Comprehensible Input, Strategies, and Interaction
  • Share your higher-order thinking questions orally with a partner
  • Role-play two classroom discussions to determine whether or not students were given ample opportunities for interaction
piq chart what did you see
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionPIQ ChartWhat did you see…

…that could have a positive impact in your classroom?

…that was interesting?

…that you have a question about?

let s write objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Write Objectives
  • Review the section on language objectives
    • MCC p. 27
  • Review the six categories of language objectives
    • MCC pp. 32-33

Write one content objective

and one language objective

for a lesson you will teach in the near future

share your objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionShare Your Objectives
  • Find an eyeball partner
  • Share your objectives
  • Provide feedback, using the checklist on p. 34:
    • The objectives are measurable
    • The objectives are written and presented in language that students can understand
    • The content objective is related to the key concept of the lesson
    • The language objective promotes student academic language growth. It is not something most students already do well.
    • The language objective connects clearly with the lesson topic or lesson activities
    • I have a plan for assessing student progress on meeting these objectives during the lesson
comprehensible input
Comprehensible Input

Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

what do we need to learn language
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionWhat do we need to learn language?
  • Comprehensible input
    • Hearing the language used at a level we can understand
  • Opportunities to interact
    • Use it or lose it!
  • A non-stressful environment that reduces our anxiety as much as possible

Krashen, S. D. (1982). Principles and practice in second language

acquisition. New York: Pergamon Press.

comprehensible input1
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionComprehensible Input
  • Speech appropriate for students’ proficiency level (e.g., slower rate, enunciation, and simple sentence structure for beginners)
  • Clear explanation of academic tasks
  • A variety of techniques used to make content concepts clear (e.g., modeling, visuals, hands-on activities, demonstrations, gestures, body language)
take 3
Ivanna Mann-Thrower 2008 CMSTake 3

Put a book in the freezer for 1hour.

Before you take the book out of the freezer, boil water in a kettle.

Take the book out of the freezer and hold it above the steam. (Be careful)

Water will form on the book.

That is condensation!

so what did i do
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionSo… What did I do?
  • Speech appropriate for students’ proficiency level (e.g., slower rate, enunciation, and simple sentence structure for beginners)
  • Clear explanation of academic tasks
  • A variety of techniques used to make content concepts clear (e.g., modeling, visuals, hands-on activities, demonstrations, gestures, body language)
comprehensible input in action
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionComprehensible Input in Action
  • Number off 1-3
  • EVERYONE read the lesson introduction at the bottom of p. 84
  • ONEs read Mr. Dillon’s lesson
  • TWOs read Mr. Lew’s lesson
  • THREEs read Mrs. Estorga’s lesson
comprehensible input in action1
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionComprehensible Input in Action

At your tables:

  • Share what you read.
  • Answer the following questions about each lesson:
    • What did the teacher do to make sure his/her speech was appropriate for the students?
    • How did the teacher make his/her explanation of academic tasks clear?
    • What techniques did the teacher use to make content concepts clear?
a variety of techniques used to make content concepts clear
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionA Variety of Techniques used to make Content Concepts Clear

At your tables, brainstorm a list of techniques you could use to make content concepts clear

Stand up and find a partner from another table

  • Partner A: Share your objectives
  • Partner B: Provide at least one idea for a technique to make content concepts clear
  • Switch roles and repeat!
let s get planning
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Get Planning!

Begin to build a lesson around the

objectives you have written:

  • Take out your Day 2 Planning Sheet
  • Complete the page on Comprehensible Input:
    • How will you provide a clear explanation of academic tasks?
    • What techniques will you use to make content concepts clear?

Think about your students’ English language proficiency levels as you plan!

strategies
Strategies

Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

features
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionFeatures
  • Ample opportunities provided for students to use learning strategies
  • Scaffolding techniques consistently used, assisting and supporting student understanding (e.g., think-alouds)
  • A variety of questions or tasks that promote higher-order thinking skills (e.g., literal, analytical, and interpretive questions)
as an educator what is your ultimate goal for your students
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission As an educator, what is your ultimate goal for your students?

…to understand the text?

…to pass the test?

…to graduate?

…something more?

do you agree
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionDo you agree?
  • Mentally active learners are better learners
  • Learning strategies can be taught
  • Learning strategies transfer to new tasks
  • Academic language learning is more effective with learning strategies

MCC p. 100

Chamot & O’Malley, 1994

learning strategies
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLearning Strategies
  • are used by students
  • help students become independent learners

List of learning strategies: pp. 97-100

proficient reader research
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionProficient Reader Research
  • Proficient readers use comprehension strategies in all kinds of text
  • Comprehension strategies can be taught
  • The more they are taught explicitly and practiced,

the more likely students are to use them independently in their own reading!

MCC p. 99

Dole, Duffy, Roehler & Pearson, 1991

Baker, 2004

carousel
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionCarousel
  • Number off 1-6
  • Move to your poster
  • Write specific lessons or class activities in which students could use the strategy listed on your poster
  • At the signal, move to the next poster and add ideas to it
let s get planning1
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Get Planning!

On the Strategies page of your planning

sheet, answer the first two questions:

  • What learning strategies would you like students to use in this lesson?
  • Are your students familiar with these strategies already?
    • If not, how will you provide explicit instruction?
    • If so, how will you provide opportunities to use them?
scaffolding model
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionScaffolding Model

MCC p. 101

Increasing Independence

Apply

Teach

Model

Practice

scaffolding video
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionScaffolding Video
  • What are some specific scaffolding

techniques that MaryEllen Vogt

mentions?

gradual release of responsibility
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionGradual Release of Responsibility
  • Motivate students’ strategy use by showing how applying strategies helps improve comprehension
  • Mentally model to make your thinking apparent to students
  • Provide guided and independent practice so that students learn to use strategies when cued by a diverse array of goals, needs, tasks, demands, and texts
  • Promote independent strategy use by shifting responsibility for using strategies to students as quickly as possible

Brown 2008

let s get planning2
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Get Planning!

On the Strategies page of your planning sheet, answer the third question:

  • How will you scaffold instruction for struggling learners?
hots higher order thinking skills
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionHOTS: Higher-Order Thinking Skills
  • What is higher order thinking?
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy, revised by Krathwohl
    • MCC pp. 102-103
  • Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy handout

“Learning proceeds from concrete knowledge to abstract values.” –MCC p. 102

“It is possible to reduce the linguistic demands of responses while still promoting higher levels of thinking.” –MCC p. 103

the importance of hots
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionThe Importance of HOTs
  • Is it important to ask HOTS questions?
    • Why?
  • One reason: students learn to ask HOTS questions themselves

Using your Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy handout, complete the HOTS Questions worksheet.

party mixer
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionParty Mixer
  • When the music starts,

move around the room

  • When the music stops, FREEZE!
    • Share your HOTS questions with

whoever is standing closest to you

    • Determine which level of Bloom’s the

questions belong to

  • When the music starts again,

repeat!

let s get planning3
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Get Planning!

On the Strategies page of your planning sheet, answer the last question by listing HOTS questions or tasks you will include in your lesson.

interaction
Interaction

Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

features of interaction
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionFeatures of Interaction
  • Frequent opportunities for interaction and discussion between teacher/student and among students, which encourage elaborated responses about lesson concepts
  • Grouping configurations support language and content objectives of the lesson
  • Sufficient wait time for student responses consistently provided
  • Ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts in L1 as needed with aide, peer, or L1 text
opportunities for interaction
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionOpportunities for Interaction
  • What are some ways we have interacted with each other during SIOP training?
  • What grouping configurations have we used?
  • How could you use those same activities with your students?
slide41

“Talk – about books and subjects – is as important educationally as the books and subjects themselves.”

-Gerald Graff

Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

what are the benefits of interaction
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionWhat are the benefits of interaction?
  • Deeper understanding of text
  • Oral language development
  • Brain stimulation
  • Increased motivation
  • Reduced risk
  • More processing time
  • Increased attention

-MCC p. 116

slide43

“Unfortunately, these practices tend not to be prevalent in secondary classrooms with or without English learners.”

-MCC p. 116

Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

role play
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionRole-Play
  • Find a partner
  • Whoever has a birthday coming up soonest will be the teacher
  • The other partner will be the students
  • Role-play these two scripts:
    • Mainstream Lesson, pp. 116-117
    • SIOP Model Lesson, pp. 117-119
  • Answer the questions on your handout
slide45
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission
  • Who did most of the talking?
  • How did the teacher elicit elaborated responses?
  • How engaged were the students?
clarifying key concepts in l1
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionClarifying Key Concepts in L1
  • Academic skills such as reading will transfer from L1 to L2
  • Provides important academic support for those who are not yet fully proficient in English

“(…) all SIOP classrooms should have resources in the students’ native languages”

a word about online translations
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionA Word about Online Translations

Effective SIOP teachers consciously allow students to express their thoughts fully, without interruption. Many teachers in U.S. schools are uncomfortable with the silence that follows questions or comments, and they immediately fill the void by talking themselves.

www freetranslation com
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionwww.freetranslation.com

Los maestros efectivos de SIOP permiten conscientemente a estudiantes para expresar sus pensamientos completamente, sin interrupción. Muchos maestros en escuelas de EEUU son incómodos con el silencio que sigue preguntas o comentarios, y ellos llenan inmediatamente el vacío hablándolos.

slide49
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permission

The master troops of SIOP permit consciously students to express their thoughts completely, without interruption. Many teachers in schools of US are uncomfortable with the silence that continues questions or comments, and they fill immediately the empty one speaking them.

www wordreference com
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionwww.wordreference.com

Set 1 /set/ sustantivo

(of tools, golf clubs, pens, keys) juego m;(of books, records) colección f;(of stamps) serie f;a matching ~ of sheets and pillowcases un juego de cama

(TV) aparato m, televisor m;(Rad) aparato m, receptor m

(in tennis, squash) set m

(Theat) (stage) escenario m;(scenery) decorado m

(Cin) plató m

let s get planning4
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionLet’s Get Planning!

Complete the INTERACTION page of your lesson planning sheet.

If time allows, review your planning sheet and begin to create a full lesson plan based on your notes.

share your lesson plan
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionShare your Lesson Plan
  • Find a partner that you have not worked with today
  • Share your lesson plans with each other
  • Give and receive feedback
did we meet our content objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionDid we meet our Content Objectives?

You will be able to…

  • List various techniques for making content concepts clear to your students
  • Create two or three higher-order thinking questions to include in a lesson plan you are writing
  • Identify ways to increase interaction in your classroom
did we meet our language objectives
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionDid we meet our Language Objectives?

You will be able to…

  • Write a lesson plan that includes features of Comprehensible Input, Strategies, and Interaction
  • Share your higher-order thinking questions orally with a partner
  • Role-play two classroom discussions to determine whether or not students were given ample opportunities for interaction
ticket out the door
Leticia M. Trower 2010 Used by permissionTicket out the Door

CHOOSE TWO:

  • I am still struggling with…
  • I really appreciated…
  • I don’t quite understand…
  • I am excited about…
  • I learned…