m5e1 business communication report writing ens english department n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
M5e1 - Business Communication & Report Writing ENS English Department PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
M5e1 - Business Communication & Report Writing ENS English Department

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 36

M5e1 - Business Communication & Report Writing ENS English Department - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 148 Views
  • Uploaded on

M5e1 - Business Communication & Report Writing ENS English Department. Heba El-Hendi . Ch 8-Negative Messages Objectives . 1. Understand what is a negative message 2. Understand the indirect plan and its advantages for negative messages

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'M5e1 - Business Communication & Report Writing ENS English Department' - bowen


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
ch 8 negative messages objectives
Ch 8-Negative Messages Objectives
  • 1. Understand what is a negative message
  • 2. Understand the indirect plan and its advantages for negative messages
  • 3. Understand the five guidelines for using the indirect plan
  • 4. Practice by writing a negative message using the indirect plan
objective 1 understanding a negative message
Objective 1: Understanding a negative message
  • A negative message is one that is likely to be viewed as unpleasant, disappointing, or unfavorable by the receiver.
  • A refusal of a request that has been made by you or your organization
  • Challenging to compose
objective 2 understanding and using the indirect plan
Objective 2: Understanding and using the indirect plan
  • Indirect plan: opens on neutral ground or on a point of agreement and then leads into the main idea later in the message.
  • Advantages of the indirect plan:
    • Enables receiver to……
    • Accept negative information
    • Maintain a satisfactory relationship with you
objective 2 understanding and using the indirect plan contin
Objective 2: Understanding and using the indirect plan , contin….
  • The negative sentence or section is followed by reasons explaining refusal/unfavorable information.
  • Prepares reader for negative information
  • Goal: achievement of a positive receiver reaction
the indirect plan
The Indirect Plan
  • Determination of content by asking yourself :
  • Whatideas can I use in the opening to establish coherence and build goodwill in this particular situation?
  • Why is it in the receiver’s interest for me to refuse the request or present the unfavorable information?
  • Is there an alternative course of action that I can recommend to this receiver?
  • What friendly message can I convey in the off-the-subject close?
indirect plan opening buffer
Indirect Plan: Opening Buffer
  • Must: provide coherence, build goodwill, be positive, maintain neutrality, and introduce explanation.
  • One to three sentences
  • Providing Coherence: tying the negative message to a previous interaction (conversation, a point of agreement, prior transaction, etc).
  • Example: Thank you for interviewing with us for the program director position
indirect plan opening buffer contin
Indirect Plan: Opening Buffer Contin…
  • Build Goodwill: use courteous, polite words such as thank you, please, and I appreciate.
  • Positive words, avoid negative
    • Helps set a favorable tone and makes message more acceptable to reader
  • Maintains Neutrality: Do not suggest negative information in the beginning. It should not be a yes or a no.
  • Introduce explanation:
    • The last sentence of the buffer should have the indication of the explanation.
    • This method sets up for the logical explanation and helps provide coherence.
indirect plan ii logical explanation
Indirect Plan: II. Logical Explanation
  • After the opening buffer and usually one paragraph
  • The reasons should show how the negative information will be in the best interest of the receiver
  • Reasoning then should be: calm, convincing, and pleasant by using the “you-viewpoint”
indirect plan ii logical explanation contin
Indirect Plan: II. Logical ExplanationContin
  • Beginning of logical explanation should use coherence techniquesrelating it to the opening.
  • Should be composed with the receiver’s interest or benefits as the focal point
  • Use rules of emphasis:
    • Start with emphasizing the points most favorable to your receiver
    • Least favorable information should be deeper in the paragraph
indirect plan ii logical explanation contin1
Indirect Plan: II. Logical ExplanationContin
  • Positivity: logical explanation should be positive and negative words should be avoided
  • situation vs. problem needed change vs. correction
  • avoid: failure, cannot, trouble, inadequate, and defective
indirect plan iii negative information
Indirect Plan: III. Negative Information
  • Consists of the request refusal, unfavorable decision, or other disappointing information
  • Receivers will be expecting this information if the opening buffer and logical explanation were effective
  • Goal: present negative information in a format that is clear to the receiver by explicitly stating the decision or implying.
  • Depends on situation
indirect plan iii negative information contin
Indirect Plan: III. Negative Information Contin….
  • Example of implying negative information
    • “Smoking is permitted in the hallways only”
  • Explicit:
    • “Smoking is prohibited in the classrooms and offices”  
  • For effective communication of negative information, it is better to say what can be done rather than what cannot be done.
  • Explicit terms
    • “therefore, the committee has not approved your application for admission”
    • leaves no doubt in the receiver’s mind
  • *depends on culture
indirect plan iii negative information contin1
Indirect Plan: III. Negative Information Contin….
  • De-emphasis techniques:
  • Place negative information in middle of a paragraph
  • Never have negative information in a separate paragraph
  • Negative news may be followed by an additional reason or suggested alternative(s)
  • Negative news should be given in as few words as possible
  • Can place negative news in a dependent clause.
indirect plan iii negative information contin2
Indirect Plan: III. Negative Information Contin….
  • Be positive and avoid negative words.
  • Say what can be done
  • Avoid apologies
indirect plan follow up and friendly close
Indirect Plan: Follow-up and Friendly Close
  • Constructive Follow-Up
  • provide other solutions to the problem, if possible.
  • suggest other alternatives
  • Friendly Close
  • Goal is to move the receiver’s mind away from the problem
  • Be warm, friendly, and optimistic
objective 4 differentiate between poor and good negative messages
Objective 4: Differentiate between poor and good negative messages
  • Kerbs Furniture has manufacturing plants in six locations within the United States. Its Georgetown, Texas, plant manufactures collective reproductions and has been operating for 35 years. It currently has 150 employees who have excellent fringe benefits and earn above-average salaries for the Georgetown area. Krebs began its operation in Georgetown with 12 employees and steadily grew to more than 250 employees. About five years ago competition in producing collectible reproductions, especially from international companies, increased tremendously. This competition forced Krebs to downsize its workforce to its present size of 150 employees. Now Krebs’ management, realizing that it cannot compete with the lower production costs due to the low wages that international companies pay, has decided to close its Georgetown plant at the end of the year. Your task is to write a memo conveying the negative information to the employees and, at the same time, to make the information acceptable and maybe even desirable for them.
prompt exercise
Prompt Exercise
  • Remember:

Determine appropriate content, write an effective opening buffer, provide a convincing logical explanation, give negative information positively, assist the receiver with constructive follow-up (if possible), and build goodwill and a friendly close.

chapter 9 persuasive messages
Chapter 9: Persuasive Messages
  • Objectives:
  • 1. Describe a persuasive message.
  • 2. Understand the purposes of a persuasive message.
  • 3. Know the four specific guidelines for using the indirect plan for persuasion.
  • 4. Practice the new methods.
objective 1 describe a persuasive message
Objective 1: Describe a Persuasive Message
  • A persuasive message is a request for action when you believe the receiver may be unknowing, disinterested, or unwilling. It is also a communication maneuver trying to change the opinion of the receiver.
  • Objective of persuasive message is to get the receiver to read/listen to the entire message AND have the receiver react positively to the request.
objective 1 describe a persuasive message1
Objective 1: Describe a Persuasive Message
  • Will be viewed neither as positive nor negative by the receiver.
  • Used for both internal and external communication
  • Internal: speech asking employees to volunteer, requesting initiation of a policy, requesting donations for a charity your company endorses
  • External: sales message- a communication that has a description of a product, its benefits, available options and models, price, and related services.
  • ***Most common***
  • Request to respond to a questionnaire, letters requesting employment with an organization.
the purpose of indirect plan for persuasive messages
The Purpose of Indirect Plan for Persuasive Messages
  • Should be used for messages attempting to convince the receiver to take an action.
  • First present the benefits that the receiver may gain from fulfilling the request.
  • Puts the receiver in the proper frame of mind to consider the request.
the purpose of indirect plan for persuasive messages1
The Purpose of Indirect Plan for Persuasive Messages
  • Ensure that the reader reads the benefits first.
  • Requires use of more words than the direct plan
  • If positively constructed in the ‘you-viewpoint’, the receiver will more likely be in a positive mood and consider the rest of the message
objective 3 four specific guidelines for using the indirect plan for persuasion
Objective 3: Four Specific Guidelines for Using the Indirect Plan for Persuasion
  • Before implementing the plan, analyze your recipient, and use the ‘you-viewpoint’ to stress the receiver’s interests and benefits
objective 3 four specific guidelines for using the indirect plan for persuasion1
Objective 3: Four Specific Guidelines for Using the Indirect Plan for Persuasion
  • I. Attention
    • A. attract the receiver’s attention in opening sentence
    • B. cause the receiver to read or to listen to rest of message.
    • C. be positive and brief.

II. Interest

    • A build attention gained in the opening
    • B. show benefits
    • C. Motivate receiver to continue reading

III. Desire

    • A. Build on receiver’s attention and interest by providing proof of benefits.
    • B. Re-emphasize benefits to the receiver
    • C. Downplay any negative points or obstacles.

IV. Action

    • Motivate receiver to take immediate action
    • Be positive
    • Make action easy
indirect plan
Indirect Plan
  • I. Attention: attract the receiver’s attention in opening structure
  • Increases the chances that the receiver will continue to read/listen to the entire message and then take desired action
  • Opening should be concise and positive that intrigues the receiver’s curiosity
i attention
I. Attention:
  • Types:
    • Mechanical devices (color or drawings)
    • Use the receiver’s name in the sentence
    • Rhetorical questions Interjections
  • Must consider the ‘you-viewpoint’
  • Can use any gimmicks but should not give receiver the impression that he/she will be mislead
  • “Your investment of $10 may grow to a million dollars by the end of the year”
ii interest
II. Interest
  • Must hold receiver’s interest of his/her attention is gained through the opening
  • Maintained when the receiver sees benefits for himself or herself
iii desire
III. Desire
  • After gaining attention and interest, offer proof of the benefits for the receiver
  • Purpose is to motivate the receiver to take requested action
  • Facts and figures can be valuable but should not be overused
  • Attempt to anticipate the receiver’s negative reactions
iv action
IV. Action
  • Ask the receiver to take immediate action
  • Action requested of the receiver should be a logical next step
  • Ensure that minimal effort is required for receiver to take the necessary action
  • State clear date if needed by a certain date
objective 4 practice new methods
Objective 4: Practice new methods
  • Jeri Matthews has been a computer specialist for Samson Foods Distribution in Jackson, Tennessee, for seven years. Samson Foods is opening a new distribution center in Little Rock, Arkansas, this fall. The vice president for operations recently spoke to Jeri about the new facility. At that time, he did not tell Jeri about the responsibility of her transferring to Little Rock. Now, he would like Jeri to make a lateral transfer to Little Rock and assume the duties of computer analyst. It would not be a promotion for Jeri nor would there be an increase in pay; however, the company will pay moving expenses and a relocation allowance. Jeri would have to move to a new city and get a system operating for the new distribution center.