They played a game reactions to obesity stigma in a cyberball game
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They Played a Game: Reactions to Obesity Stigma in a Cyberball Game. John B. Pryor & Glenn D. Reeder Illinois State University Eric D. Wesselmann, Kipling D. Williams, & James Wirth Purdue University. Presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Meetings

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They played a game reactions to obesity stigma in a cyberball game

They Played a Game: Reactions to Obesity Stigma in a Cyberball Game

John B. Pryor & Glenn D. Reeder Illinois State UniversityEric D. Wesselmann, Kipling D. Williams, & James WirthPurdue University

Presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Meetings

January 27, 2007, Memphis, TN


What is cyberball

What is Cyberball? Cyberball Game

An online game of “catch”

Participants control an animated hand that tosses a ball to 2-3 other players who in turn toss the ball to each other or the participant

Other players are actually “virtual confederates” whose tossing behavior can be programmed


Cyberball game
Cyberball Game Cyberball Game

Megan

Ashley

Sara

Me


When other players ostracize someone the prevailing norm is to try to include that person
When other players ostracize Cyberball Gamesomeone, the prevailing normis to try to include that person

Megan

Megan

Megan

Ashley

Sara

Me


How is adherence to an inclusion norm affected by the presence of a powerful stigma
How is adherence to an Cyberball Gameinclusion norm affected by the presence of a powerful stigma?


Measure of implicit anti fat attitudes

Preview Cyberball Game

Other

Players

Play

Cyberball

Basic Procedure

& Design

ostracism

of obese

player

1 obese

& 2 non-obese

players

Assess

Anti-fat

Attitudes

inclusion

of obese

player

measure

of explicit

anti-fat

attitudes

measure

of implicit

anti-fat

attitudes

ostracism

of non-obese

player

3

non-obese

players

inclusion

of non-obese

player


Participants received photos of the other 3 players prior to the Cyberball game. In half the conditions, one of the other players was obese. We altered photos to make the same person appear obese or normal weight.

Obese

Control

Control


Cyberball game1
Cyberball Game the Cyberball game. In half the conditions, one of the other players was obese. We altered photos to make the same person appear obese or normal weight.

Megan

Ashley

Sara


Pictograph judgments implicit anti fat attitudes amp
Pictograph Judgments: Implicit Anti-Fat Attitudes (AMP) the Cyberball game. In half the conditions, one of the other players was obese. We altered photos to make the same person appear obese or normal weight.

  • Before and after photos of 30 women taken from Weight Watchers website

Judgment

of

Meaning

1 second

1 second

Judgment

of

Meaning


t the Cyberball game. In half the conditions, one of the other players was obese. We altered photos to make the same person appear obese or normal weight.(95) = 5.68, p < .01



Hypotheses
Hypotheses Women

  • Adherence to an inclusion norm will be reduced when one of the players is stigmatized

  • Explicit attitudes will be related to more controlled or deliberative biases toward the stigmatized person

  • Implicit attitudes will be related to automatic biases toward the stigmatized person



Player X Ostracism: target?F(2,184) = 9.16, p < .01

Player X Obesity: F(2,184) = 3.19, p < .05


After first receiving the ball, how many turns did the participant delay in tossing the ball to the target?

Megan

Ashley

Sara


F participant delay in tossing the ball to the target?(1,84) = 6.27, p < .02

(means adjusted

for covariates)


* participant delay in tossing the ball to the target?

F(1,84) = 5.85, p < .02

* p <.01



Ostracism X Obesity X Implicit Bias to the target?

F(1,84) = 13.21, p < ,01

(means adjusted

for covariates)


* to the target?

*

*

* p <.01


Conclusions
Conclusions to the target?

  • Inclusion norms are weaker when people interact with a stigmatized person

  • Explicit attitudes moderate the impact of a stigma upon more controlled behaviors

  • Implicit attitudes moderate the impact of a stigma upon more automatic behaviors.


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