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The 14 Points of Edwards Deming As described by Dobyns and Crawford-Mason. Create a Constancy of Purpose. What are we doing and why are we doing it? There must be a long-term aim and all members of the school community must know and understand it

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the 14 points of edwards deming as described by dobyns and crawford mason
The 14 Points of Edwards DemingAs described by Dobyns and Crawford-Mason

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

create a constancy of purpose
Create a Constancy of Purpose
  • What are we doing and why are we doing it?
  • There must be a long-term aim and all members of the school community must know and understand it
  • The aim must have meaning and be concerned with the future
  • “Open for business during renovations”

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

learn the new philosophy
Learn the New Philosophy
  • Competition out − Cooperation in (win-win)
  • The leader must know that people learn in different ways and at different speeds
  • There will be doubters, opponents, and enthusiastic supporters − some thrilled and some terrified
  • Determine what the school needs and gain the knowledge and skills to get it done

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

cease dependence on mass inspection
Cease Dependence on Mass Inspection
  • Inspection (tests) does not add quality; it tells you if quality exists
  • Tests cannot make students more intelligent
  • Inspections point out those students who have mastered material and those who have not
  • Teachers can tell who has mastered materials and skills

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

don t buy on price tag alone
Don’t Buy on Price Tag Alone
  • The cost of anything is not the initial price, but the initial price plus how much you must pay over the life of the product
  • Look at the introduction of curriculum through this lens
  • Introduction of a new master schedule—we know the initial effort, but what are the long term impacts and costs?

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

improve process constantly
Improve Process Constantly
  • Never stop trying to make things better.
  • With this philosophy, one is never done.
  • Take giant leaps forward, especially in student learning. Between the giant leaps, smaller improvements may or may not emerge.
  • The Baldrige philosophy aligns with these concepts.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

institute training for skills
Institute Training for Skills
  • This assumption implies that your staff is the most important resource you have.
  • What they carry around in their heads and the ability to work together is paramount for success.
  • Training (SD) is provided, but a significant part is to make sure they know why.
  • Maintain emphasis on teamwork and communication.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

institute leadership
Institute Leadership
  • “What leadership must do is help people.”
  • Everyone in the school must be a leader and trained as such.
  • Move away from supervision of staff and into leadership of staff.
  • Implement the principle of succession.
  • A leader is someone who steps back from the entire system and tries to build a more collaborative, more innovative system that will last over the long term. Robert Reich

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

drive out fear
Drive Out Fear
  • “Drive out fear, build trust.”
  • Fear is a method of control. Operating in this manner does not accomplish something positive, but avoids anything negative.
  • Staff must feel comfortable and secure enough to cooperate fully, point out problems, and offer solutions − an atmosphere of risk taking.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

break down barriers between staff areas
Break Down Barriers Between Staff Areas
  • “Build a system within your organization for win-win. This means cooperation and the elimination of competition.”
  • Every part of the school must cooperate for the benefit of the total school.
  • Avoid—if you can’t look good yourself, make someone else look bad.
  • It is difficult and maybe unrealistic to expect ordinary people to act like selfless saints. There is a reason there are so few of them. But don’t stop trying to convert!!

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

eliminate slogans exhortations and targets
Eliminate Slogans, Exhortations, and Targets
  • The principal says, we are going to increase student achievement by 10%. The larger question is how are we going to do this.
  • Deming does not suggest eliminating slogans, exhortations, or targets, but rather avoiding blaming teachers for a lack of progress or suggesting that success is totally in the hands of the teacher.
  • The focus should be on continuous improvement and long-term success.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

eliminate numerical goals and quotas
Eliminate Numerical Goals and Quotas
  • This assumes that quality is more important than quantity.
  • The focus should be on how well students know what they know.
  • The core element involves taking students from where they are to as far as they can go.
  • With numbers, there will always be someone in the lower percentiles so let’s focus on mastery and long-term improvement.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

remove barriers to joy in work
Remove Barriers to Joy in Work
  • “Abolish the annual rating or merit system which ranks people, creates competition, and conflict.”
  • The only lifelong and reliable motivations are those that come from within.
  • One of the strongest motivations is the joy and pride that grow from knowing you have just done something as well as you can.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

institute education and self improvement
Institute Education and Self-improvement
  • “No organization can survive with just good people. They need people that are improving.”
  • One of the problems with American education is that we believe that once the diploma or degree is granted that education is over. We would not want our cardiologist who graduated in 1977 operating on us if she had not continued to learn new techniques.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006

accomplish the transformation
Accomplish the Transformation
  • Develop a critical mass of associates who also believe this process will work.
  • Search for cooperation with everyone using what they know to accomplish the aims of the school.

Johns Hopkins University School of Professional Studies in Business and Education

2006