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TISAS ESSAY. Introduction: Set up your essay. WHAT IT NEEDS: A hook Author, title, type of work (Homer, epic poem) Context: broad that narrows to specific An awesome thesis that the author can prove, and that answers the question “so what” An academic tone

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TISAS ESSAY


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    1. TISAS ESSAY

    2. Introduction: Set up your essay WHAT IT NEEDS: • A hook • Author, title, type of work (Homer, epic poem) • Context: broad that narrows to specific • An awesome thesis that the author can prove, and that answers the question “so what” • An academic tone • Use of the 3rd person! (No: I, you, me, our, we, etc.)

    3. Example: • The battle of the sexes is not a new concept; it isas ancient as the Greek culture that Homer writes about in The Odyssey. In his epic poem, Homer wastes little time convincing his readers of his hero’s supreme attributes; Odysseus is god-like, the gods favor him, he surpasses all men in cunning, and the women love him. Though these accolades cast an impressive and powerful figure, in the shadow of his dominance resides a host of powerful women who profoundly affect him and the course of his journey. Homer spends much of The Odyssey describing the physical power that men have, but through his examples of the many ways women weave traps that conquer men, Homer provides evidence that in the poem, Penelope, Calypso, and Circe are equally as powerful as the men in an unequal society.

    4. Topic Sentence: • Introduces the idea of the paragraph and is derived from the thesis: • EX: Thesis: . Homer spends much of The Odyssey describing the physical power that men have, but through his examples of the many ways women weave traps that conquer men, Homer provides evidence that in the poem, Penelope, Queen Arete, and Circe are equally as powerful as the men in an unequal society. • Topic Sentence: Through her dealings with the suitors, Penelope demonstrates the power of women to weave deceptive schemes that purposefully utilize men’s chronic weakness in the face of female wiles.

    5. Introduction of Evidence #1 • Move from generalities of topic sentence to specifics—narrows the focus EX: Penelope uses her understanding of her own femininity, and the stereotypes attached to it by society, to artfully draw out the time that she can avoid committing to a suitor.

    6. Supporting Evidence: • Quote that has TLC (Tag, Lead, Citation) Tag=indentifies who is speaking the words/to whom are they speaking Lead=context of the quote (when, where, how) Citation=(author book.line/lines) Ex: “Quote”(Homer 10.209-210). Remember—end punctuation goes outside of the citation.

    7. Supporting Evidence with Embedded Quote: Embedded Quote=Tag Lead Evidence Citation EX: During the assembly in Ithaca early in the poem, Antinousexpresses his frustration at her use of feminine wiles, proclaiming, “For three years now, getting on to four, she’s played it fast and loose with all of our hearts, building each man’s hopes—dangling promises, dropping hints to each—but all the while with something else in mind” (Homer 2.95-100).

    8. Fully Embedded: • For almost four years, Penelopeproves to be a master of deception, “building each man’s hopes”(2.98), and “carefully dangling promises” yet, “all the while”(2.99) as Antinouspetulantly admits, “ she [has] something else in mind” (Homer 2.100).

    9. Analysis of Evidence (Commentary): • In at least 2-3 sentences, explain how your quotation proves the point you brought up in your topic sentence. Remember: My quote means/This quote means=Ms. Wendel’s tears. EX: Penelope understands that the longer Odysseus is gone, the more insistent the suitors will become, but she uses her charms to draw out the process as long as possible. It is notable that it is Antinous, a man, who admits that she tricks the men for four years. His anger at the trick only enhances Penelope’s power over them. Understanding the limited power she has to assert herself directly, she indirectly weaves illusions in the men’s heads that extend her ability to stay true to her husband.

    10. REPEAT: • Introduction of 2nd (relevant) quote • Supporting evidence • Analysis

    11. Summary: • Wrap up the ideas of this paragraph in relation to the topic sentence AND thesis. EX: As a woman, Penelope uses her power to play on this tradition, and on male ego, in order to prolong her own life as Odysseus’ wife. ON TO THE NEXT 

    12. Paragraph #2: Queen Arete She holds the power to let Odysseus get home on his last stop. She uses her powers of observation rather than strength to test him. Paragraph #3: Circe She uses the skills she has at her disposal (magic and understanding men’s weaknesses) to trap Odysseus’ men (and therefore him). She uses her sexuality to keep him from his journey.

    13. Conclusion: Wrap it up (without saying “in conclusion”) WHAT IT NEEDS: • A topic sentence—moves from last idea, and summarizes preceding ideas • Restatement of thesis in a new way—and double check that you’ve “proved” it • To address the “so what” issue/question and how/why it all matters: fortune cookie of your paper—leave me thinking. WATCH OUT FOR: cliché use and “opening a new can of worms”

    14. Common Errors: Old stuff • Past vs. Present: verbs in analytical writing about a text always place the action in the present tense. Odysseus thinks vs. thought or was thinking • Title=italics (and it’s The Odyssey) • Quote’s punctuation goes outside the mark unless the quote has an ! or a ? already. • As Homer states, he is the “Man of twists and turns”(Homer 1.1). • Active voice: • It is argued that…Homer argues that… • It is stated that…Odysseus states that… • It is shown that…It shows that…