chapter 10 waves and sound n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 10: WAVES AND SOUND PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 10: WAVES AND SOUND

play fullscreen
1 / 59
Download Presentation

Chapter 10: WAVES AND SOUND - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

awena
286 Views
Download Presentation

Chapter 10: WAVES AND SOUND

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Chapter 10: WAVES AND SOUND

  2. This lecture will help you understand: • Vibrations and Waves • Wave Motion • Transverse and Longitudinal Waves • Sound Waves • Reflection and Refraction of Sound • Forced Vibrations and Resonance • Interference • Doppler Effect • Bow Waves and the Sonic Boom • Musical Sounds

  3. Vibrations and Waves Vibration: a wiggle in time Wave: a wiggle in space and time that transports energy

  4. Vibrations and Waves When a bob vibrates up and down, a marking pen traces out a sine curve on the paper that moves horizontally at constant speed.

  5. Vibrations and Waves Vibration and wave characteristics • crests • high points of the wave • troughs • low points of the wave

  6. Vibrations and Waves Vibration and wave characteristics (continued) • amplitude • distance from the midpoint to crest or trough • wavelength • distance from the top of one crest to the top of the next crest, or distance between successive identical parts of the wave

  7. Vibrations and Waves CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR The distance between adjacent peaks in the direction of travel for a transverse wave is its A. frequency. • period. • wavelength. • amplitude.

  8. Vibrations and Waves CHECK YOUR ANSWER The distance between adjacent peaks in the direction of travel for a transverse wave is its A. frequency. • period. • wavelength. • amplitude. Explanation: Or between adjacent troughs or any adjacent identical parts of the waveform.

  9. Vibrations and Waves Description: • Vibration described by frequency—how frequently vibratory motion occurs • Wave described by frequency, speed, amplitude, and wavelength

  10. Vibrations and Waves Frequency: number of to-and-fro vibrations in a given time unit: 1 vibration per second = 1 Hertz Period: defined as the time it takes for a complete vibration unit: any unit of time, often the second

  11. Vibrations and Waves Relationship between frequency and period: Frequency = 1/period Unit: Hertz (Hz) Period = 1/frequency Unit: second (s) The source of all waves is a vibration. Higher frequency means increased rate of energy transfer — shorter wavelengths.

  12. Vibrations and Waves CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR If the frequency of a particular wave is 20 Hz, its period is A. 1/20 second. • 20 seconds. • more than 20 seconds. • none of the above.

  13. Vibrations and Waves CHECK YOUR ANSWER If the frequency of a particular wave is 20 Hz, its period is A. 1/20 second. • 20 seconds. • more than 20 seconds. • none of the above. Explanation: Note when  = 20 Hz, T = 1/ = 1/(20 Hz) = 1/20 second.

  14. Wave Motion Wave speed • describes how fast a disturbance moves through a medium • related to the frequency and wavelength of a wave Example: • a wave with wavelength 1 meter and frequency of 1 Hz has a speed of 1 m/s

  15. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves Two common types of waves that differ because of the direction in which the medium vibrates compared with the direction of travel: • longitudinal wave • transverse wave

  16. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR The vibrations along a transverse wave move in a direction A. along the wave. • perpendicular to the wave. • Both of the above. • Neither of the above.

  17. Transverse and Longitudinal Waves CHECK YOUR ANSWER The vibrations along a transverse wave move in a direction A. along the wave. • perpendicular to the wave. • Both of the above. • Neither of the above. Comment: The vibrations in a longitudinal wave, in contrast, are along (or parallel to) the direction of wave travel.

  18. The Nature of Sound Sound travels in longitudinal waves — vibrating compressions and rarefactions through air Speed of Sound Sound travels at 340 m/s in air at 20°C

  19. The Nature of Sound A situation to ponder… Consider a person attending a concert being broadcast over the radio, sitting about 45 m from the stage. The person listens to the radio broadcast with a transistor radio over one ear and the nonbroadcast sound signal with the other ear. Further suppose that the radio signal must travel all the way around the world before reaching the ear.

  20. A situation to ponder… CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR Which signal will be heard first? A. Radio signal. • Nonbroadcast sound signal. • Both at the same time. • None of the above.

  21. A situation to ponder… CHECK YOUR ANSWER Which signal will be heard first? A. Radio signal. • Nonbroadcast sound signal. • Both at the same time. • None of the above. Explanation: A radio signal travels at the speed of light—3  108 m/s. Time to travel 45 m at 340 m/s ≈ 0.13 s. Time to travel 4  107 m (Earth’s circumference) at 3  108 m/s ≈ 0.13 s. So if you sit farther back at the concert, the radio signal would reach you first!

  22. Sound Waves How sound is heard from a radio loudspeaker • radio loudspeaker is a paper cone that vibrates • air molecules next to the loudspeaker set into vibration • produces compressions and rarefactions in air • sound waves reach your ears, setting your eardrums into vibration • sound is heard

  23. (a) paper cone vibrates in rhythm with an electric signal. (b) vibrations are displayed on an oscilloscope — a graph of pressure versus time. Radio Speaker

  24. The Nature of Sound For each increase of 1°C above 0°C, speed of sound increases by 0.6 m/s. Order of increasing speeds of sound: • in air (≈ 340 m/s) • in warm air (>340 m/s) • in water (≈ four times speed in air) • in steel (≈ 15 times speed in air)

  25. process in which sound encountering a surface is returned often called an echo multiple reflections called reverberations Reflection

  26. Reflection Diffuse Reflection When sound or light is incident on a rough surface, it is reflected in many directions.

  27. Reflection CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR Compared with a dry road, seeing is difficult when driving at night on a wet road. Why? A. Wet surface is smooth with less diffuse reflection, part of which would otherwise reach the driver’s eyes. • Wet road usually means a wet windshield. • Wet road usually means more vapor in the air. • There is no reason—that’s just the way it is.

  28. Reflection CHECK YOUR ANSWER Compared with a dry road, seeing is difficult when driving at night on a wet road. Why? A. Wet surface is smooth with less diffuse reflection, part of which would otherwise reach the driver’s eyes. • Wet road usually means a wet windshield. • Wet road usually means more vapor in the air. • There is no reason—that’s just the way it is.

  29. Refraction Refraction: the bending of a wave due to a change in the medium and/or speed of the wave

  30. Refraction Sound waves refract when parts of the wave fronts • travel at different speeds. • are affected by uneven winds • when air near the ground is warmer than air above.

  31. Reflection and Refraction of Sound Dolphins emit ultrasonic waves to enable them to locate objects in their environment

  32. Forced Vibrations and Resonance Forced vibration • setting up of vibrations in an object by a vibrating force Example:factory floor vibration caused by running of heavy machinery Natural frequency • own unique frequency (or set of frequencies) • dependent on • elasticity • shape of object

  33. Stages of Force Vibration

  34. Resonance Resonance occurs whenever successive impulses are applied to a vibrating object in rhythm with its natural frequency.

  35. Interference Interference combined effect of two or more overlapping waves

  36. Interference Two types of interference: • Constructive interference crest of one wave overlaps crest of another wave  adding to a wave of increased amplitude • Destructive interference crest of one wave overlaps the trough of another  amplitude effects are reduced

  37. Interference CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR Interference is a property of A. sound. • light. • Both of these. • Neither of these.

  38. Interference CHECK YOUR ANSWER Interference is a property of A. sound. • light. • Both of these. • Neither of these. Explanation: Interestingly, the presence of interference tells a scientist whether something is wavelike or not. All types of waves can interfere.

  39. Interference Application of sound interference • noisy devices such as jackhammers are equipped with microphones to produce mirror-image wave patterns fed to operator’s earphone, cancelling the device’s sound

  40. Interference Application of sound interference (continued) • Sound interference in stereo speakers out of phase sending a monoaural signal (one speaker sending compressions of sound and other sending rarefactions) • As speakers are brought closer to each other, sound is diminished

  41. Interference Beats • periodic variations in the loudness of sound due to interference • occur with any kind of wave • provide a comparison of frequencies

  42. Interference Standing waves

  43. Interference Nodes of standing wave

  44. Doppler Effect Doppler Effect: the change in frequency as measured by an observer due to the motion of the • source or • listener Named after Austrian physicist and mathematician, Christian Johann Doppler

  45. Top view of water waves made by a stationary bug jiggling (up and down) in still water. Water waves made by a bug swimming in still water toward point B. A & B receive different wave frequencies. Water Bug Doppler Effect

  46. Doppler Effect Example of Doppler Effect: Frequency of waves received by an observer increases as a sound source approaches. Wave frequency decreases as the source recedes.

  47. The Doppler Effect CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR When a fire engine approaches you, the A. speed of its sound increases. • frequency of sound increases. • wavelength of its sound increases. • All increase.

  48. The Doppler Effect CHECK YOUR ANSWER When a fire engine approaches you, the A. speed of its sound increases. • frequency of sound increases. • wavelength of its sound increases. • All increase. Comment: Be sure you distinguish between sound, speed, and sound frequency.

  49. The Doppler Effect CHECK YOUR NEIGHBOR The Doppler effect occurs for A. sound. • light. • Both A and B. • Neither A nor B.