Customers roles in service delivery chapter 13
Download
1 / 14

Customers’ Roles in Service Delivery (Chapter 13) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 262 Views
  • Updated On :

Customers’ Roles in Service Delivery (Chapter 13). Gap 3 - Service Performance Gap Importance of Customers in Service Delivery Customers’ Roles Strategies for Enhancing Customer Participation. GAP 3. Provider Gap 3. CUSTOMER. Service Delivery. COMPANY. Customer-Driven

Related searches for Customers’ Roles in Service Delivery (Chapter 13)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Customers’ Roles in Service Delivery (Chapter 13)' - ashley


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Customers roles in service delivery chapter 13 l.jpg
Customers’ Roles in Service Delivery(Chapter 13)

  • Gap 3 - Service Performance Gap

  • Importance of Customers in Service Delivery

  • Customers’ Roles

  • Strategies for Enhancing Customer Participation

ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


Provider gap 3 l.jpg

GAP 3

Provider Gap 3

CUSTOMER

Service Delivery

COMPANY

Customer-Driven

Service Designs and Standards

Part 5 Opener

ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


Key factors leading to provider gap 3 l.jpg
Key Factors Leading to Provider Gap 3

Service Delivery

GAP

3

  • Key Factors Related to Customers:

    • Customers lack

    • Customers are

    • Customers are not

    • Interference by

    • Incompatible

Customer-Driven Service Designs and Standards

ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


Importance of customers in service delivery l.jpg
Importance of Customers in Service Delivery

  • Co-production

  • Levels of customer participation:

    • low participation

      • examples:

  • moderate participation

    • examples:

  • high participation

    • examples:

  • ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Levels of customer participation across different services l.jpg
    Levels of Customer Participation Across Different Services

    Table 13.1

    Source: Adapted from A. R. Hubbert, “Customer Co-Creation of Service Outcomes: Effects of Locus of Causality Attributions,” doctoral dissertation, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, 1995.

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Services production continuum l.jpg
    Services Production Continuum

    Gas Station Illustration:

    1. Attendant pumps gas and attendant takes payment at the pump

    2. Attendant pumps gas and customer goes inside to pay attendant

    3. Attendant pumps gas and customer pays at the pump with automation

    4. Customer pumps gas and attendant takes payment at the pump

    5. Customer pumps gas and goes inside to pay attendant

    6. Customer pumps gas and pays at the pump with automation

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Importance of other fellow customers in service delivery l.jpg
    Importance of Other (“Fellow”) Customers in Service Delivery

    • Other customers can detract from satisfaction

    • Other customers can enhance satisfaction

      • roles:

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Customer roles in service delivery l.jpg
    Customer Roles in Service Delivery

    (1) Productive Resources

    (2) Contributors to Quality

    and Satisfaction

    (3) Competitors

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    1 customers as l.jpg
    (1) Customers as

    • “partial employees”

      • contributing

    • customer inputs can affect organization’s productivity

      • e.g.,

      • e.g.,

  • key issue:

    • should

      • e.g.,

      • e.g.,

      • e.g.,

    • should

  • ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    2 customers as l.jpg
    (2) Customers as

    • Customers can contribute to

      • by performing their role effectively

      • by working with the service provider

      • by asking questions

      • by taking responsibility for their own satisfaction

      • by complaining when there is a service failure

    • e.g., H&R Block:

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    3 customers as l.jpg
    (3) Customers as

    • customers may

      • the primary competition may not be other service firms, but

      • “internal exchange” vs. “external exchange”

    • internal/external decision often based on:

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Strategies for enhancing customer participation l.jpg
    Strategies for Enhancing Customer Participation

    Figure 13.3

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Strategies for enhancing customer participation13 l.jpg
    Strategies for EnhancingCustomer Participation

    • Define

      • helping

      • helping

      • promoting the

    • Recruit, educate, and reward

      • recruit the right

      • educate and train customers to

      • reward customers for

      • avoid negative outcomes of inappropriate

    • Manage the

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    Characteristics of service that increase the importance of compatible segments l.jpg
    Characteristics of Service that Increase the Importance of Compatible Segments

    Table 13.2

    Source: Adapted from C. I. Martin and C. A. Pranter, “Compatibility Management: Customer-to-Customer Relationships in Service Environments,” Journal of Services Marketing,3, no. 3 (Summer 1989), pp. 5–15.

    ã 2005 - Dwayne D. Gremler


    ad