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Co-TEACHING Service Delivery Model

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  1. Co-TEACHINGService Delivery Model Building Background Knowledge To Close the Gap for All Students Co-Teaching for Gap Closure CT4GC Cohort 2, Summer 2013

  2. Learning Targets Co-teaching Partners will: • Gain an awareness and understanding of Collaborative Q&A document • Identify characteristics of each co-teaching  approaches • Begin preparing to co-teach • Use terminology within the appropriate context

  3. Roles and Responsibilities • Document

  4. Expectations for my team: What will you Learn and Be Able To Do: Principals Internal Coach Co-Teachers 1 2 • Learn each of the co-teaching approaches • Co-Teachers will create lessons, use approaches and evidence instructional strategies based on students’ needs • Implement co-teaching approaches with fidelity • Ongoing monitoring student progress 3 • Utilize KDE’s Collaborative Teaching Practices Q & A Document • Recognize each of the co-teaching approaches • Convey high expectations • Guide scheduling & create effective co-teacher teams • Utilize walk-through instrument correctly • Interpret school data & student needs to determine co-taught classes • Utilize KDE’s Collaborative Teaching Practices Q & A Document. • Facilitate Data Collection-Student identification Numbers needed • Recognize each of the co-teaching approaches. • Conduct before, and after lesson feedback sessions • Utilize walk-through • Instrument effectively • Monitor instructional needs: accommodations vs. modifications, strategies, and grading practices CT 4 GC

  5. It takes TWO! Co-teaching Partnership

  6. Student Characteristics Student Characteristics Handout Packet, page 1 As a team, read each statement and label either T – Student w/ Typical Needs U – Student w/ Unique Needs A – All students Compare your team’s response to chart on page 2. Discuss whether you agree or disagree with your findings during the comparison

  7. AllStudents are General Educationstudents first!!!

  8. Rate Your Knowledge No Clue (0) Heard of it … (1) Know about it (2) Use it! (3)

  9. Glossary of Terms • Inclusion • Integration • Collaboration • Co-teaching • Lab Classroom

  10. Inclusion • A belief system or philosophy that all students are a part of the learning community/classroom and make valuable contributions, even if their abilities differ. Adapted from: Marilyn Friend, Inc. 2008

  11. Integration Three educational dimensions that contributes to inclusion: • Physical • Social • Instructional Marilyn Friend, Inc. 2008

  12. Collaboration “The systematic process in which we work together to analyze and impact professional practice in order to improve our individual and collective results.” Rick DuFour, 2003

  13. Lab Classroom A classroom where student gaps are being closed through use of : • Continuous Classroom Improvement • Co-teaching approaches • Use of evidence-based instructional strategies • Student supports needed An action-researched classroom where the co-teachers are doing something for the first time and others are observing with the intention to learn. Time for reflection on the process on how it could inform their classrooms/instruction to increase student engagement and achievement.

  14. Co-Teaching Defined

  15. Co-Teaching Co-teaching occurs when two or more certified teachers jointly deliver substantive instruction to a diverse, or blended, group of students in a single physical space. Cook & Friend Math Co-Teachers-Stephanie Karl and Sara Matthews, Caverna High School

  16. Co-Teaching Two or more professionals jointly delivering substantive instruction to a diverse, blended group of students in a single physical space. (Friend & Pope, 2005;Spencer, 2005)

  17. Rationale forCo-Teaching • Promotes principles of Inclusive practices among teachers • Provides a number of benefits for students, teachers, and organizations

  18. Co-Teaching Approaches Whole Group • One Teach, One Observe (Lead & Support) • Team Teaching Speak and Add Speak and Chart • One Teach, One Assist (Shadow Teaching) Adapted from: MarilynFriend, Inc., 2008

  19. Co-Teaching Approaches • Small Group • Station Teaching • Parallel Teaching • Alternative Teaching • Skill Groups Adapted from: Marilyn Friend, Inc., 2008

  20. Approaches

  21. Graphic Organizer Use Handout, page 4 as we watch and learn about our co-teaching approaches. List Strengths and Drawbacks For “Our” Classroom…. when to use or not use.

  22. One Teach, One Observe(Lead and Support) • One co-teaching partner leads the instruction, while the other partner collects data through observation • Monitoring progress is based on preset criteria • Co-teaching partners pre-determine specific observational information to gather during instruction and together analyze the data for instructional decisions • It is recommended to use this approach 5 to 10% • Roles are to be exchanged to sustain teacher parity

  23. Strategies for Implementing One Teach, One Observe • Communicate in/out boxes that do not interrupt teaching • Behavior documentation charts • Posted homework charts • Materials station- both teachers need access • “See Me Later” Cards

  24. One Teach, One Observe

  25. Station Teaching Approach • Co-teaching partners divide instructional content into two or more segments, with each partner taking responsibility for delivery of instruction within a station • Students will access both co-teaching partners by rotating from one station to the next, with one station being for independent work • It is recommended that this approach be used 30% of the time • Co-teaching partners should not use this approach when content is required to be taught in sequential order

  26. Strategies for Implementing Station Teaching Approach • Co-teaching partners divide instructional content into two or more segments, with each partner taking responsibility for delivery of instruction within a station • Students will access both co-teaching partners by rotating from one station to the next, with one station being for independent work • It is recommended that this approach be used 30% of the time • Co-teaching partners should not use this approach when content is required to be taught in sequential order

  27. Strategies for Implementing Station Teaching • Use of timers and signals • Practice routines as a class procedure • Have colored index cards stating student role at stations • Table tents with directions • Always have something for them to turn in • Provide Anchor Activities

  28. Station Teaching

  29. Parallel Teaching Approach • Co-teaching partners, each take on an active role • Instructionally by dividing the class into two groups and teaching the same content simultaneously • This approach allows more supervision of student learning • This approach also provides students a greater chance to participate and interact with their peers • It is recommended to implement this approach 30-40%.

  30. Strategies for Implementing Parallel Teaching • Break groups by learning styles • Ensure heterogeneous grouping • Put a deck of cards over desk (on the ceiling) and call suits or matching cards for grouping • Include brain breaks • Teach with a timer to keep everyone • on track

  31. Parallel Teaching

  32. Alternative Teaching Approach • One co-teaching partner takes responsibility for instructing the large group while the other works with a small group for a specific instructional purpose • The temporarily formed group maybe based on enrichment, re-teaching, interest area, pre-teaching, etc. • It is recommended that this approach be used 20-30% • Roles are exchanged to sustain teacher parity

  33. Strategies for Implementing Alternative Teaching • Use mini dry erase boards • Have accessible computer station • Create individualized folders with appropriate work • Provide adapted classics or modified • books available

  34. Alternative Teaching

  35. Teaming ApproachSpeak & Add, Speak & Chart • Both Co-teaching partners are fully engaged in leading the delivery of core instruction at the same time • Co-Teaching partners are delivering the same instruction simultaneously • Co-teachers may have equally active roles,such as one co-teacher leading the large-group lesson while the other models note-taking (Speak & Chart) or restates key concepts for clarification (Speak & Add) • It is recommended that this approach be used 30%

  36. Speak and Add • Co-Teaching partners are on stage at the same time. • One partner leads the instruction while the other • adds to the lesson by… ~ asking students questions, ~ stating important information, ~ asking co-teaching partner for clarification (referencing), ~ uses humor, ~ adds another perspective, and ~ adding new information by way of anecdotes, real world examples, short stories, etc.

  37. Strategies for Implementing Speak and Add • Develop a signal before interjecting information • General educator asks for input • Questions are asked for clarification • Engage in referencing

  38. Speak and Chart • One co-teaching partner presents the information, while the other charts key points and student responses. • Variety of graphic organizers are used to model connections of information • Copies of organizers and note taking are modeled

  39. Strategies for ImplementingSpeak and Chart • Have a variety of graphic organizers to model connections of information • Copies of organizers and note taking assists all learners • Use copies for students who have been absent • Use charting for review

  40. Teaming: Speak and Add Speak and Chart

  41. One Teach, One Assist Approach(Shadow Teaching) • One co-teacher is primarily responsible for delivery of core instruction while the other co-teacher circulates through the classroom providing support to students as needed. • This approach is the most commonly used, but the least preferred • It is recommended that this approach be used less than 20%

  42. Strategies for ImplementingOne Teach, One Assist (Shadow Teaching) • Use proximity control. • Have additional supports available for student use. • ( e.g. dictionaries or calculators for some students, • vocabulary cards for others) • Model appropriate behavior for class • (e.g. active listening)

  43. Skill Groups • Each co-teaching partner is responsible for a group • Students are grouped based on instructional needs in order to participate in the concept being taught • Groups are temporarily formed based on instructional skill needs of the students in the classroom • Group membership changes from day to day

  44. Strategies for ImplementingSkill Groups • Use a sorting of the groups based upon the immediate instructional needs of the class. • Grouping is temporary and flexible. • Room arrangement facilitates. • Cooperative learning groups need • routines and structure for this to be effective. • Takes more teacher prep to do well. • Very targeted to student need.

  45. Think-and-Chart • At each table, you will find cards numbered 1 to 9 • Each person/team will need one card • With your handout packet (pg 5) and Q&A document (Q#3) in hand, go to the chart that has your assigned number • Read the scenario that corresponds to the number you were assigned • Collaboratively determine which approach the co-teaching partnership was utilizing within the scenario • Discuss the benefits of the co-teaching approach chosen within the scenario

  46. Think-and-Chart • At each table, you will find cards numbered 1 to 9 • Each person/team will need one card • With your handout packet (pg 5) and Q&A document (Q#3) in hand, go to the chart that has your assigned number • Read the scenario that corresponds to the number you were assigned • Collaboratively determine which approach the co-teaching partnership was utilizing within the scenario • Discuss the benefits of the co-teaching approach chosen within the scenario • Rotate to the next number (example 12; 91)

  47. Scenarios for the Co-teaching Approaches 7 Scenario 1 While studying results of the ‘daily checks for understanding' toward learning targets, co-teachers determined that some of the students are having difficulty following directions for completion of the student response system. The plan is for one co-teacher to lead the activity with, while the other co-teacher circulates and provides prompts to individual students when needed.

  48. Scenarios for the Co-teaching Approaches 1 Scenario 2 Co-teaching partners are planning for the next lesson within the start of a new unit. After studying pre-test results, six students were identified as not understanding some of the domain-specific vocabulary. At the beginning of the next class period, the content teacher will take that group and review vocabulary by completing a visual activity (cross-word puzzle) which includes the words students are having difficulty, while the strategic teacher begins the bell-ringer activity with the rest of the class.

  49. Scenarios for the Co-teaching Approaches 3 Scenario 3 The class of 28 students are working through the PDSA process for 100% of the students to pass the EoC exam. After studying student performance data, the partnership decided the content teacher will compile multiple choice questions and key points from the content that need to be addressed. The strategic teacher will further study performance data to divide the class into two groups. Each group will include students who have an A /B average on the end of unit exams and those who have a C average or below. Each co-teacher facilitates a group to ensure pre-determined key points are included during response discussions.

  50. Scenarios for the Co-teaching Approaches 1 Scenario 4 After studying the results of the previous day’s quiz, the co-teaching partnership planned for the first part of the class period. Mr. Smith will take the majority of the class and focus on preparing them for an upcoming homework assignment, while Mr. Jones will review the questions answered incorrectly on the previous day’s test with the smaller group of students.