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English Language Enhancement and the Good Practice Principles. The Griffith English Language Enhancement Strategy Presenter: Nicole Brigg Griffith English Language Institute AIEC October 2010. Overview of the session. Overview of the Griffith English Language Enhancement Strategy

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English Language Enhancement and the Good Practice Principles

The Griffith English Language Enhancement StrategyPresenter: Nicole BriggGriffith English Language InstituteAIEC October 2010

overview of the session
Overview of the session

Overview of the Griffith English Language Enhancement Strategy

Context, rationale & related research

The English Language Enhancement Course

development

implementation

challenges & successes

mapping to the Good Practice Principles

research

1 overview of the griffith english language enhancement strategy
1. Overview of the Griffith English Language Enhancement Strategy

Before your degree

During your degree

Finishing your degree

Adapted from http://www.griffith.edu.au/griffith-english-language-institute/university-initiatives

Griffith UniPrep

An intensive 3-week program delivered prior to each semester for students with unconditional offer.

Provides the language skills essential for successful tertiary studies in English.

Student Linx

Social immersion experiences.

Promotes social and intellectual interaction, encouraging the establishment and building of useful ties across languages, cultures and countries.

IELTS4grads

Subsidised IELTS ‘exit test’ at end of degree.

Students completing a full degree at Griffith can sit an IELTS test at 50% of normal test fee.

English Language Enhancement Course (ELEC)

Credit-bearing, embedded, and discipline-specific.

English

HELP

Free discipline-specific English language support for all degree program students.

Group workshops & individual consultations with GELI tutors.

2 context and rationale
2. Context and rationale

Birrell report (2006)

AEI National Symposium (2007)

DEEWR Good Practice Principles (2008)

context and rationale
Context and Rationale

2007 Audit of all English language support mechanisms across the whole university undertaken in the lead up to AUQA audit in 2008

Established an English Language Working Party (2008) to develop English language support initiatives for international students

Membership: DVC (Academic), PVC (international), Secretariat, International Office, academics, School of Languages & Linguistics, Griffith English Language Institute

Developed and implemented the Griffith English Language Enhancement Strategy

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Universities are responsible for ensuring that their students are sufficiently competent in the English language to participate effectively in their university studies.

Resourcing for English language development is adequate to meet students’ needs throughout their studies.

Students have responsibilities for further developing their English language proficiency during their study at university and are advised of these responsibilities prior to enrolment.

Universities ensure that the English language entry pathways they approve for the admission of students enable these students to participate effectively in their studies.

English language proficiency and communication skills are important graduate attributes for all students.

Development of English language proficiency is integrated with curriculum design, assessment practices and course delivery through a variety of methods.

Students’ English language development needs are diagnosed early in their studies and addressed, with ongoing opportunities for self-assessment.

International students are supported from the outset to adapt to their academic, sociocultural and linguistic environments.

International students are encouraged and supported to enhance their English language development through effective social interaction on and off campus.

Universities use evidence from a variety of sources to monitor and improve their English language development activities.

DEEWR December 2008

Good Practice Principles for English Language Proficiency for International Students in Australian Universities
recent research in discipline specific support
Recent research in discipline-specific support

The impact of English language proficiency and workplace readiness on the employment outcomes of tertiary international students (Arkoudis, Hawthorne, Baik, O’Loughlin, Leach, Bexley, 2009)

Improving academic outcomes of undergraduate ESL students: the case for discipline-specific academic skills programs (Baik & Greig, 2009)

english language enhancement course elec
English Language Enhancement Course (ELEC)

Mandatory for all UG international students with IELTS<7

Optional domestic CALD* students

Delivered in student’s first semester of UG study

Offered on all campuses in semester 1 and 2

Common delivery standards, learning outcomes, content & assessment

Co-delivered by LAL & GELI (2 hourslectures: 2 hours tutorials)

*culturally and linguistically diverse

3 english language enhancement course
3. English Language Enhancement Course

Credit-bearing:

- 10 credit points

- not an additional requirement

- no extra time to complete

Embedded:

- first semester of all UG degrees

- complicated program rule changes

Discipline-specific:

- sub-committee devised the recommended criteria and intended learning outcomes

- working parties within each broad discipline were consulted

- four course outlines devised and approved

development intended learning outcomes
Development: Intended Learning Outcomes

To develop the communicative competence (grammatical, sociolinguistic, discourse, strategic) in English of students in an academic and specific disciplinary context, including producing, interpreting, analysing and participating in text. Text refers to authentic spoken or written discourse in a particular genre.

To raise student awareness of features and expectations of the Australian tertiary system that underpin English language practices in Australian universities as it fits within the broader Australian cultural context.

3. To ensure students are aware of their responsibility to continue to develop their English language skills throughout the course of their degree program.

implementation
Implementation

Establishing of partnership between the Griffith English Language Institute (GELI) and the School of Languages and Linguistics (LAL)

Project managers from each appointed to:

Consult with working parties from each of the 4 Groups and create course outlines for Business; Health; SEET; Arts & Social Sciences

Discipline-specific nature of content (Development teams)

Embedding of some ExcelL intercultural communication skills role-plays

Recruiting and training of tutors

Text book

challenges successes
Challenges & successes

Challenges:

Lecture vs tutorial hours and minimum numbers for each (1200 sts)

Working across elements (LAL/GELI)

Communication channels between the newly appointed LAL coordinator, the other two newly appointed lecturers, the GELI coodinator & 25 tutors

Multicampus challenges

Communication between the convenors of the 4 courses and the tutorial development team

Time to develop material

Discipline-specific yet common outcomes so as to be comparable across all four streams

Variables in the student cohort: differing proficiency levels; differing academic skills backgrounds

challenges successes14
Challenges & successes

Successes:

All enrolment systems, student identification systems and exemption application systems worked very well

Material development teams (Convenor, RA, GELI tutor)

LAL/GELI relationship producing further useful cooperative ventures

Significant interest from other Australian institutions

An encouraging degree of buy-in from academic units across the university

Significant growth in international students accessing other GELES strategies and support services

Euphoria associated with the successful launch of a new and innovative Higher Education program

elec research aims
ELEC research aims

To measure change in English language proficiency of international students who undertake ELEC

To measure change in educational outcomes by international students who undertake ELEC

To demonstrate that an ELEC improves the above when implemented as an early intervention strategy

To investigate the correlation between language proficiency, language achievement and overall academic outcomes.

To investigate the cohorts’ experiences in engaging in learning English in terms of their motivation, investment and outcomes (qualitative).

elec research methodology
Cohort 1 S2 2009: Non-ELEC students

Cohort 2 S2 2010: ELEC students

IELTS pre first semester

IELTS post first semester

Qualitative interviews

IELTS at degree exit

Correlation against GPAs

ELEC research methodology
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References

Arkoudis, S., Hawthorne, L., Baik, C., Hawthorne, G., O'Loughlin, K., Leach D., Bexley, E . (2009). The impact of English language proficiency and workplace readiness on the employment outcomes of tertiary international students. Retrieved on May 5 2010, from http://www.cshe.unimelb.edu.au/people/staff_pages/Arkoudis/ELP_Executive_Summary.pdf

Baik, C., Greig, J. (2009). Improving the academic outcomes of undergraduate ESL students: the case for discipline-based academic skills programs. Higher Education Research and Development, 28 (4), 401-416.

Berry, B., & Lewkowicz, J. (2000). Exit-tests: Is there an alternative? Hong Kong Journal of Applied Linguistics, 5(1), 19-49.

Birrell, B. (2006). Implications of low English standards among overseas students at Australian universities. People and Place, 4 (4), 53-64.

Birrell, B., Hawthorne, L., & Richardson, S. (2006). Evaluation of the General Skilled Migration Categories. Canberra:Commonwealth of Australia.

Birrell, B., Healy E. & Kinnaird B. (2007). Cooks Galore and Hairdressers Aplenty. People and Place, 15(1), 30-44.

Borbasi, S., Johnson, G., Wyatt-Smith, C., Haugh, M., Humphreys, P. (2009) Evaluating the effect of a for-credit English language enhancement course on international students at a large Australian university. Unpublished internal grant application, Griffith University.

Bretag, T. (2007). The emperor's new clothes: yes, there is a link between English language competence and academic standards. People & Place, 15(1), 13-21.

Commonwealth Department of Education Employment & Work Relations. (2008). Good Practice Principles for English Language Proficiency for International Students in Australian Universities – Final Report. Retrieved May 5 2009, from http://www.deewr.gov.au/HigherEducation/Publications/Pages/GoodPracticePrinciples.aspx

Elder, C. & O'Loughlin, K. (2003). Score gains on IELTS after 10-12 weeks of intensive English study. IELTS Research Reports,4, 62-87.

English Tested. (2009, January 28). The Australian. Retrieved February 17 2010, from http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/letters/english-tested/story-e6frgcox-1111118680938

Griffith University. (2009a). University initiatives. Retrieved May 18 2009, from http://www.griffith.edu.au/griffith-english-language-institute/university-initiatives

Griffith University. (2009b). English Language requirements for entry to Griffith University, Retrieved March 1 2009, from http://www.griffith.edu.au/ua/aa/sta/admission/requirements/home.html

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Harvey, L. (2000). New realities: the relationship between higher education and employment. Tertiary Education & Management, 6, 3-17.

Hawthorne, L. (2007). Outcomes, language, employment and further study: A discussion paper for a National Symposium: English Language Competence of International Students. Paper presented at the 2007 National Symposium on English Language Competence of International Students, Sydney, Australia.

Hawthorne, L. (In press 2009). Demography, migration and demand for international students. In C. Findlay & W. Tierney (Eds) (In press). The Asia Pacific Education Market. World Scientific Press: Singapore.

Healy, G. & Trounson, A. (2010, February 10). Universities told to boost English programs. The Australian. Retrieved February 17 2010 from http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/universities-told-to-boost-english-programs/story-e6frgcjx-1225828473695

International English Language testing System (2007). IELTS Handbook. University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations, the British Council and IDP Education Australia

Johnson, I. (2010). Utilising cultural diversity in the English language classroom, EA Journal (In Press)

Mak, A., Westwood, M., Ishiyama, I., Barker, M. (1999). Optimising conditions for learning sociocultural competencies for success. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 23(1), 77-90

Murray, D., & O’loughlin, K. (2007) Pathways – Preparation and Selection: A discussion paper for a National Symposium: English Language Competence of International Students. Paper presented at the 2007 National Symposium on English Language Competence of International Students, Sydney, Australia.

O’Loughlin, K., & Arkoudis, S. (2009). Investigating IELTS exit score gains in higher education. IELTS Research Reports, 10. IELTS Australia Pty Ltd, Canberra

Qian, D. (2007). Assessing university students: Searching for an English language exit test. RELC Journal, 38(1), 18-37. Retrieved January 29 2010, from http://rel.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/38/1/1

Trounson, A. (2010, February 17). Griffith makes English refresher mandatory. The Australian. Retrieved February 17 2010, from http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/griffith-makes-english-refresher-mandatory/story-e6frgcjx-1225831097095

Zhengdong, G. (2009). IELTS Preparation Course and Student IELTS Performance: A Case Study in Hong Kong. RELC Journal, 40(1), 23-41. Retrieved January 29 2010, from http://rel.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/40/1/23