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Student Affairs and Technology StudentAffairs.com Virtual Case Study National Competition Grand Valley State University College Student Affairs Leadership Carrie A. Gilchrist Michael P. Slocum Adrian M. Aldrich Presentation Outline

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student affairs and technology studentaffairs com virtual case study national competition

Student Affairs and TechnologyStudentAffairs.com Virtual Case Study National Competition

Grand Valley State University

College Student Affairs Leadership

Carrie A. Gilchrist

Michael P. Slocum

Adrian M. Aldrich

presentation outline
Presentation Outline
  • Course Rationale: Will respond to possible objections to the implementation of a Student Affairs and Technology course in a student affairs graduate program, as well as give specific reasoning for our choices.
  • General Information: Will provide overall principles regarding the proposed course, the work associated with the course, and other necessary details pertinent to course implementation.
  • Syllabus: Will contain a traditional outline of course description, topic list, assignments, and course information.
  • Lesson Plan: Will provide a detailed outline of each class period as well as out-of-class assignments.
course rationale

Course Rationale

Student Affairs and Technology

student affairs and technology course rationale
Student Affairs and Technology Course Rationale
  • Technology is an ever-changing part of society. The majority of students have grown up with understanding of innovations such as e-mail, and Instant Messenger, even if the actual technology was never utilized in their lives.
  • Due also to increasing technological innovations, each student is not guaranteed to have personal experience with every piece of technology available today. Part of the purpose of College Student Personnel (CSP) programs is to prepare competent professionals to interact with students. Technology has affected every facet of today’s student and will continue to do so as even more technological advancements are made.
  • To not create a course studying technology and its impact on and implications for student affairs is to settle for the status quo and to under-prepare professionals. This does a disservice to students and works against the purpose of CSP programs.
student affairs and technology course rationale5
Student Affairs and Technology Course Rationale
  • In addition to meeting the needs of the students, “Student Affairs and Technology” will also meet the needs of higher education institutions. In order to remain competitive with other institutions, as well as increase efficiency within an institution, institutions need to be employing technology to serve students’ needs in the areas recruitment and retention, and classroom instruction.
  • An increasing number of students research and learn about an institution online before they visit a campus in person. Often times today’s students decide whether or not to visit a campus based on information gathered from the World Wide Web. Similar concepts can also be applicable to professionals as they job search and accept or reject position interviews.
  • In order for institutions to retain students using technology, schools may choose to adapt to the changing needs and wants of its students with regards to online classes, Blackboard, e-mail, etc. It is only logical then, that this course prepare its students for awareness of such tools, as well as each tool’s impact and implication for higher education.
student affairs and technology course rationale6
Student Affairs and Technology Course Rationale
  • CSP programs require a current and fluid curriculum. This course is designed to be adapted over time to the changing needs of students and institutions.
  • Currently, the course is designed such that there are three themes:
    • Technology in Today’s Society
    • Technology’s Impact on Higher Education
    • The Future of Technology and Higher Education and the Roles of Practitioners, Faculty and Community
  • Much of the course work currently falls under the third theme, as modern-day technology’s major impact and place in higher education is yet to be seen due to the infancy of many modern-day innovations.
  • When technology truly has a larger impact on higher education, topics currently under the third theme will become more applicable topics to themes one and two.
student affairs and technology course rationale7
Student Affairs and Technology Course Rationale
  • The class is titled “Student Affairs and Technology,” but the class itself has a much broader theme than simply how technology is used. The impact of modern-day technologies and their implications for higher education is simply the topic through which to examine the future of higher education as an institution.
  • The capstone nature of the course ties in topics from the previous three semesters’ work, with technology being an object to be viewed through a variety of different lenses.
why use student affairs and technology as a capstone
Why use “Student Affairs and Technology” as a capstone?
  • College Student Personnel programs typically culminate with a thesis/research project or comprehensive examinations. Although the successes resulting from both are crowning achievements of a graduate program, either by tying in knowledge from a variety of topics or taking an in-depth look at a single topic, a capstone course has the opportunity to do both.
  • Designed as a capstone course, this course will look at an increasingly integral aspect of higher education from a variety of lenses, using both theoretical knowledge and its practical applications. The topic of modern-day technology, because of its relative infancy in higher education, will require students to look toward the future. Combined with the timing of a student's last semester, this course will parallel a graduate student's preparation for the first steps after earning a master's degree, whether that be their first full-time professional position or newfound flexibility in an existing position.
general information

General Information

Student Affairs and Technology

student affairs and technology general information
Student Affairs and Technology General Information
  • This course will remain a course directed at graduate students entering into the field of Student Affairs. It will not, however, ignore the role of faculty and community, their interaction with technology and its overall effect on the Student Affairs profession.
  • Students taking “Student Affairs and Technology” will be required to take it as a capstone course during their final semester of study.
  • The overall driving force of the course is liberal arts in nature, taking a holistic approach to educating on the subject. The philosophy of topics and themes flows from gathering knowledge to application both in class and profession, utilizing the RAG approach: Reflect, Apply, Go out into the world.
  • The topics and assignments will culminate into an answer to the following question: “How has technology impacted higher education and how can we as student affairs professionals, use technology more effectively in today’s society to enrich our students’ experiences?”
  • Assignments and teaching methods will attempt to address various learning methods as described in The Teaching Professor, April 1993. Described in the syllabus, each assignment and teaching method will list initials addressing each type of learning style (V = visual, A = auditory, R/W = reading/writing, K = kinesthetic.
syllabus

Syllabus

Student Affairs and Technology

student affairs and technology syllabus
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Course Description

Students will use both in-class discussion and activities, and out-of-class assignments to reflect upon their graduate experience and apply how issues of technology will affect them as future practitioners.

  • Methods of Instruction

Assignments and teaching methods will attempt to address various learning methods as described in The Teaching Professor, April 1993. Described in the syllabus, each assignment and teaching method will list initials addressing each type of learning style.

  • Course Rationale

The School of Education at Your School University is committed to the development of professional educators who (a) become caring, reflective, and knowledgeable practitioners; (b) apply research, theory and best practice; and (c) create a difference in increasingly diverse communities through their varying educational roles. Professional educators integrate experience, philosophy, and discipline knowledge with professional practice in the areas of Educational Institutions, Educators and Educating, and Students and Learning. Therefore, Student Affairs and Technology will provide the learner with the skills and knowledge necessary for professional development and growth.

student affairs and technology syllabus13
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus

Course Outcomes

Upon completion of this class:

  • Students will have an understanding of how technology has affected Higher Education
  • Students will have an understanding of how current college students have been affected by technology in their lives
  • Students will be able to identify different ways to effectively reach their students
  • Students will be able to use technology to meet the needs of today’s college student
  • Students will have an enhanced understanding of technology available to students and practitioners
  • Students will be able to apply knowledge from throughout their graduate program in order to examine the role of future of their profession
student affairs and technology syllabus14
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Required Texts
    • Conn, K. The Internet and the Law: What Educators Need to Know. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2002.
    • Howe, N. and Strauss, W. Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation. New York: Vintage Books, 2000.
  • Course pack of various scholarly articles relating to individual topics
  • World Wide Web resources as appropriate to individual topics
  • Other assigned readings from educational journals and Internet sites not previously planned as new topics arise in the literature
student affairs and technology syllabus15
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Course Requirements

Class Attendance and Participation

    • Each student is expected to attend all class meetings unless the professor has given prior approval. Students who anticipate being absent from a class meeting are expected to inform the professor in advance of the meeting and to assume the responsibility for obtaining any relevant information for that day.

In the event of an unforeseen situation that requires you to miss a class, the professor should be notified at the first opportunity.

    • Each student is expected to actively participate in class discussions. The quality of your contribution will be weighted more heavily than its quantity; however, any student who misses three or more classes will automatically lose two class participation points. Assigned readings should be completed prior to the beginning of class so that you may raise any questions or issues that you would like to address in class.
student affairs and technology syllabus16
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Course Requirements continued
  • Weekly Assignments
    • Each student will complete weekly assignments to be submitted in class the following week, unless otherwise noted. Assignments will be given out at the end of each class period and will be assigned full credit when completed on time. Ten percent will be deducted from full credit if turned in up to one week late, and no credit will be given after one week.
  • Final Project
    • Each student will present a 5-10 minute final project in the style of their choosing, using technology of their choosing to be completed on the last day of class. The final project answers the following question: “How has technology impacted higher education and how can we as student affairs professionals, use technology more effectively in today’s society to enrich our students’ experiences?” Students are encouraged to utilize weekly assignments, journal articles, and any other appropriate outside resources.
student affairs and technology syllabus17
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Assignment weight and grading scale
  • The following assignments will be weighted as follows:
    • Class Participation – 35%
    • Weekly Assignments – 25%
    • Final Project – 40%
  • The following scale will be used to determine final grades:

95-100% - A 90-94% - A-

87-89% - B+ 83-86% - B

80-82% - B- 77-79% - C+

73-76% - C

student affairs and technology syllabus18
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Course Schedule
  • Week One: Introductions, Course Orientation, and History of Technology at a Glimpse
  • Theme One: Technology in Today’s Society
    • Week Two: Technology Used by Students
    • Week Three: Students with Disabilities and Technology
    • Week Four: Technology used by Administrators, Faculty, and Community
student affairs and technology syllabus19
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Course Schedule continued
  • Theme Two: Impact of Technology of Higher Education
    • Week 5: Technology’s Impact on the Concept of Learning
    • Week 6:Today’s Students and Technology
    • Week 7: Technology Impacting Students
    • Week 8: Technology’s Impact on Student Development Theory
student affairs and technology syllabus20
Student Affairs and Technology Syllabus
  • Theme Three: The Future of Technology in Higher Education and the Roles of Practitioners, Faculty and Community
    • Week 9: Rewriting Theory, the SLI, and the SPPV…Do They Still Apply?
    • Week 10: The Future of Institutional Missions
    • Week 11: Financial and Accessibility Challenges of Technology
    • Week 12: Legal and Ethical Issues
    • Week 13: The Future of Research, Assessment, and Collaboration
    • Week 14: Final Project Presentations
lesson plan

Lesson Plan

Student Affairs and Technology

week one introductions course orientation and history of technology at a glimpse
Week One: Introductions, Course Orientation, and History of Technology at a Glimpse
  • Question to Answer:
    • What is technology and how does it affect what student affairs practitioners do?
  • Student introductions – name, what you hope to learn from this class, what you hope to contribute to this class, what are you hope to enter into upon graduation.
  • Class brainstorm on definition of technology - (A) Give Webster’s definition “practical application of knowledge” – (V, A, R/W) – Drive home point that technology is not just what has been invented over the past twenty years
  • Syllabus overview– (V, A, R/W)
assignments for week two
Assignments for Week Two
  • Weekly assignment:- Technological reflection
    • In a medium of student’s choosing (2-4 pg. paper, PowerPoint, drawing, etc.) each student will describe his or her own experience with technology
  • Readings for Week Two:
    • Pastore, M. (2004, February). US college students use net for shopping. Cyberatlas Internet. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://cyberatlas.internet.com/big_picture/demographics/article/0,,5901_432631,00.html
    • Instant Messenger Guide. America On Line. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.viewz.com/features/imguide.shtml
    • PDA basics. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.netc2002.psu.edu/proceedings/sun/PDABasics.ppt
    • Teaching with technology: How to prepare your students for college. Power to Learn. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.powertolearn.com/articles/teaching_with_technology/how_to_prepare_your_students_for_college.shtml
week two technology used by students
Week Two: Technology Used by Students
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What modern-day technologies have become part of a college student’s daily interactions?
    • What is the purpose of these innovations, and what are they used for?
  • Thoughts on technological reflections
  • Small group discussion (A, R/W, K): create list of what you believe to be the three technological innovations that are used most by today’s students
  • Class Discussion of Lists – each student should record answers by each group
assignments for week three
Assignments for Week Three
  • Weekly Assignment: Each student is to survey four to five undergraduate students, one from each class standing at the institution (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, and fifth-year senior)
    • Find out what they believe to be three technological innovations used by today’s students without telling them the class assumptions. Answer the following question: Do the undergraduate students’ answers match the assumptions of the class
    • Results of weekly assignment will be complied by professor to be used in class activity during week 5
  • Readings for Week Three:
    • Gregor, P., Dickinson, A., Macaffer, A., & Andreasen, P. (2003, June). SeeWord: A personal word processing environment for dyslexic computer users. British Journal of Educational Technology, 34,341-355.
    • Hecker, L., Burns, L., Elkind, J., Elkind, K., & Katz, L. (2002). Benefits of assistive reading software for students with attention disorders. Annals of Dyslexia, 52, 243-72.
week three students with disabilities and technology
Week Three: Students with Disabilities and Technology
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What are specific technological innovations that help students with disabilities on college campuses?
  • Students will travel to the office that serves students with disabilities, or ADA compliancy office, or similar office (A, K).
  • Office staff will give presentation including:
    • Services available through office
    • Types of technology used by students with disabilities
    • Disability types: physical, learning, etc.
  • Students will utilize and experiment with various types of technology
  • After returning to class, PowerPoint presentation and discussion on “Assistive and Instructive Technology for College Students with Disabilities: A National Snapshot of Postsecondary Service Providers” (http://jset.unlv.edu/17.1/michaels/powerpoint/michaels.ppt)
assignments for week four
Assignments for Week Four
  • Weekly Assignment (R/W, K) Pick a disability from a hat. Complete an academic assignment in the manner described for your particular disability.
    • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): Read or write for 3-5 minutes, switch to another topic and repeat for 3-5 minutes. Continue to switch back and forth between the two topics until the assignment is complete.
    • Dyslexia: Read a class assignment while reading each sentence from last word in the sentence to the first word. For example, the sentence:

“Use pictures to illustrate your point.” would be read “Point your illustrate to pictures use.”

    • Vision Impaired: Wear sunglasses or glasses smeared with Vaseline, then complete a reading or writing assignment.
    • Hearing impaired: Participate in a group discussion wearing earplugs.
    • For each activity, answer questions 1 and 2 below. Activity 2b will complete questions 1, 2, and 3.

1) How long would the assignment have taken you without the disability?

2) What technology discussed in class or read about in supplemental or outside readings would have assisted you in completing the assignments with the disability in a more timely manner or more accurately?

3) (for hearing impaired only) What method did you use to communicate with others and to understand others?

  • Professor will compile the weekly assignment information for use in class activity in week 5
  • Reading assignments for Week 4:
    • Blackboard website. http://www.blackboard.com
    • Brown, S. J. & Malaney, G.D. (2001). How NASPA members use the internet. NASPA Journal, 38. Retrieved February 15, 2004 from http://publications.naspa.org/naspajournal/vol38/iss3/art3
    • Helping students use media and technology. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.mheso.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=1000
week four technology used by administrators faculty and community
Week Four: Technology Used byAdministrators, Faculty, and Community
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What are specific technological innovations that help administrators and faculty on college campuses?
    • How has technology connected universities with outlying communities?
  • In the classroom with available tools, visit the websites below to explore different ways administrators, faculty and community members can utilize technology, specifically the internet. Answer as a class how each website is used by the particular group. (V, A, R/W, K)
  • Administrators:
    • Grand Valley State University Online Directory (http://directory.gvsu.edu/cgi-bin/directory)
    • Albion College Information System (http://bannerweb.albion.edu:8010/pls/brit3/twbkwbis.P_GenMenu?name=homepage)
    • Ball State University – emergency response guidelines (http://www.bsu.edu/web/ur/responseguidelines/)
    • North Central College Student Handbook (http://www.northcentralcollege.edu/stud_current/Judical_Affairs/Handbook.htm)
  • Faculty:
    • University of Notre Dame – Faculty Senate homepage (http://www.nd.edu/~facsen/)
    • Northwestern University – professional development opportunities (http://www.northwestern.edu/hr/training/)
    • Georgetown University Libraries (with online database) (http://search.georgetown.edu/query.html?qt=library)
  • Community:
    • Grand Valley State University – Philanthropy Center (http://www.gvsu.edu/philanthropy/)
    • Grand Valley State University Calendar of Events (http://events.gvsu.edu/ViewCalendar.asp)
    • Harvard University – admissions information (http://www.harvard.edu/admissions)
  • Class discussion on how higher education has become more efficient with modern-day technology
assignments for week five
Assignments for Week Five
  • Weekly Assignment (R/W, K): Technology Log
    • Keep a log of technology that you come into contact with as an administrator, either in your assistantship or your job.
    • If assistantship/job is not part of the CSP program or related to Student Affairs, interview a Student Affairs Professional regarding their use of technology every day and how it has changed over the years. Has it been an improvement? How so? What are the challenges? E-mail assignment to professor at least 24 hours prior to class.
    • (Professor will compile this information with previous information from weekly assignments to be used in class activity during week 5)
  • Readings for Week Five:
    • Barr, R. & Tagg, J. (1995, November-December). From teaching to learning: A new paradigm for undergraduate education. Change, 27, 12-25.
    • Virginia Tech study shows shift in learning process through technology-enriched courses. (1997). Tech News. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.technews.vt.edu/Archives/1997/Nov/97449.html
week five technology s impact on the concept of learning
Week Five: Technology’s Impact on the Concept of Learning
  • Questions to Answer:
    • In what ways has technology impacted the notion or concept of learning?
    • Has a paradigm shift in the concept of learning occurred?
  • Presentation/Discussion: Learning Through History
    • Oral history: What is the value of face-to-face interaction in particular areas of study and interest?
    • Printing Press: How has this impacted education?
    • Transportation: How have innovations affected the way we learn?
    • Other Inventions
    • Athletics: How has the shift from recreation to education affected why people come to college?
  • Group Discussion
  • Hand out compilations from weeks 2, 3, and 4. Pose the following questions for class or group discussions:
    • How/why were innovations selected and how have they impacted learning?
    • Is there one piece of technology that appears to have had the largest impact?
    • Does a theme emerge in the findings (i.e. convenience, accessibility, etc.)?
    • What is our concept of learning and is that impacted by technology?
  • Paradigm Shift- Discussion of assigned articles
assignments for week six
Assignments for Week Six
  • Weekly Assignment: In the format of your choosing, answer the following questions using the materials from class and outside resources:
    • Why do some innovations impact certain individuals and not others?
    • How can we take what we have learned about how students on our campus view technology and use it to assist the progress of our field?
  • Readings for Week Six:
    • Howe, N., & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising: The next great generation. New York: Vintage Books.
    • Oblinger, D. (2003, July-August). Gen-Xers and Millennials: Understanding the “new students.” Educause, 38, 36-40, 42, 44-45.
week six today s students and technology
Week Six: Today’s Students and Technology
  • Overview of Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation and “Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials: Understanding the ‘New’ College Student (V, A, R/W)
  • Class discussion and questions to answer
      • How have students impacted the development of technology?
      • What kind of students have impacted each development in technology?
      • What is the balance between students impacting technology and technology impacting students?
  • Weekly Assignment: Make a comparison between how students have impacted technology development and how technology has impacted student development.
  • Readings for Week Seven: Continue in Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
week seven technology impacting students
Week Seven: Technology Impacting Students
  • Question to Answer:
    • What are the different ways that technology has impacted students?
  • Share findings from previous weekly assignment
  • Split class into groups (A, R/W): What technology has affected each “generation” of students discussed in Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation and “Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials: Understanding the ‘New’ College Student,” both cognitively and psychosocially?
  • Share discussion points from group with class
  • Weekly Assignment (V, R/W): Create a statement regarding technology’s impact on student development theory. Has it? If so, has it affected theory positively or negatively?
  • Readings for Week Eight:
    • Finish Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation
    • Refresh your memory on basic constructs of major student development theorists
week eight technology s impact on student development theory
Week Eight: Technology’s Impact on Student Development Theory
  • Questions to Answer:
    • Has technology impacted today’s students to a point that student development theory itself has been impacted as well?
    • If theory has been impacted, how so, and is that impact complete?
  • Class discussion (V, A, R/W, K):
    • Has application of theory evolved over time with regards to each “generation” of student
    • If so, How does theory apply to today’s students keeping in mind the importance of technology on student development
  • Split class into four groups, according to the statements made in their paper.
    • Yes, technology has impacted theory
    • No, technology has not impacted theory
    • Technology has had a positive impact on theory
    • Technology has had a negative impact on theory
  • Each group is to consist of individuals who took the OPPOSITE viewpoint of their group. Each group is to discuss and establish reason to support the assertions of the group they are in. Corresponding with the groups above, below are the viewpoints each group is to attempt to support:
    • Technology did not impact theory
    • Technology did impact theory
    • Technology had a negative impact on theory
    • Technology had positive impact on theory
  • Weekly assignment: None
  • Readings for Week Nine: Student Learning Imperative, Student Personnel Point of View
week nine rewriting theory the sli and the sppv do they still apply
Week Nine: Rewriting Theory, the SLI, and the SPPV…Do They Still Apply?
  • Questions to Answer:
    • Has technology impacted tenets of student development theory to the point that changes are necessary?
    • Do guiding principles of student affairs need change?
  • Class analysis/discussion (V, A, R/W, K)
    • Psychosocial theories
    • Cognitive theories
    • Student Learning Imperative
    • Student Personnel Point of View
    • Keys to Consider:
      • Is technology addressed in each item?
      • Does technology impact each to a point that changes need to be made?
      • Do parts no longer apply to today’s students and practices?
  • Weekly Assignment: Obtain the institutional mission from an institution of higher education. Read through the mission, focusing on how the mission does or does not address technology.
  • Readings for Week Ten:
    • Attridge, W. C. (2004) Current practices and future implications for internet counseling. CyberBytes: Highlighting Compelling Uses of Technology in Counseling.
    • Noble, D. F. (2004). Digital diploma mills: The automation of higher education. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_1/noble/
    • Online mediation website: http://www.onlineresolution.com/index-om.cfm
    • Sussman, R. J. (2004). Counseling over the internet: Benefits and challenges in the use of new technologies. CyberBytes: Highlighting Compelling Uses of Technology in Counseling.
week ten the future of institutional missions
Week Ten: The Future of Institutional Missions
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What have universities done so far in adapting technology to their missions?
    • What do universities still need to do to adapt technology to their mission?
    • Are universities going too far in integrating technology throughout their institution?
    • Can technology wants get in the way of technology needs?
  • Analyzing Mission Statements (V, A, R/W)
    • How can one find the balance between technological innovation and traditional student interaction?
  • Overview on Online Classes and Online Counseling
    • Discussion weighing benefits and drawbacks of concepts
    • What technology is necessary (what technologies are needed and what technologies are wanted?)
  • Weekly Assignment: None
  • Readings for Week Eleven:
    • College of Arts to change approach. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://www.csulb.edu/~d49er/archives/2004sping/news/volLIVno61-arts.shtml
    • Indiana U. administrators praise a plan for replacing computers every three years. Chronicle of Higher Education (November 2000).
    • Indiana University’s Strategic and Financial Planning and Information Technology in Higher Education brochure
    • Internet use among college students: Are there differences by race/ethnicity? Electronic Journal of Sociology. Retrieved February 15, 2004 from http://www.sociology.org/content/vol005.003/korgen.html
    • McCollum, K. (1999). Colleges struggle to manage technology’s rising costs. Chronicle of Higher Education.
week eleven financial and accessibility challenges of technology
Week Eleven: Financial and Accessibility Challenges of Technology
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What is the financial impact on a university’s technological decisions?
    • What should a university do to ensure the needs of under-represented groups are met?
    • How is a university’s decision-making structure set up to help and hinder decisions about technology?
  • In-class activity: Financial Planning (V, A, R/W, K)
    • Give each student a packet of possible expansions and possible cuts within a university budget, along with a budget cap, rank choices.
    • Choices range from funding existing university initiatives, funding new university initiatives, and funding initiatives that focus on specific areas and populations
    • Split the class into groups to build consensus from individual decisions
  • Post-Activity Discussion (based on week’s Questions to Answer)
  • Weekly Assignment: None
  • Readings for Week Twelve:
    • Conn, K. The Internet and the Law: What Educators Need to Know. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2002.
    • Gregory, D. E. (2002). The student handbook, federal law, and electronic technology. NASPA Journal, 40. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://publications.naspa.org/naspajournal/vol40/iss1/
week twelve legal and ethical issues
Week Twelve: Legal and Ethical Issues
  • Questions to Answer:
    • What changes have happened within the realm of higher education law due to technology?
    • What is the impact of these changes to student affairs practitioners?
  • Overview of The Internet and the Law: What Educators Need To Know (V, A)
  • Discussion on Impact
    • FERPA
    • Judicial hearings and processes
    • Fighting the copyrighting and piracy battle
  • Weekly Assignment: Group by assistantship/job department (or by interest in departments on campus if assistantship is not part of the CSP program). Analyze the existing technology in each department, briefly discuss how it has affected the department and make recommendations for improvements
  • Readings for Week Thirteen:
    • ETRAC: Educational Technology Research and Assessment Cooperative website: http://antioch.rice.edu/etrac
    • Hirt., J. B., Cain, D., Bryant, B., & Williams, E. (2003). Cyberservices: What’s important and how are we doing? NASPA Journal, 40. Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://publications.naspa.org/naspajournal/vol40/iss2/art7
    • Lafayette College: An interndisciplinary approach website: http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub85/lafayette.html
week thirteen the future of research assessment and collaboration
Week Thirteen: The Future of Research, Assessment, and Collaboration
  • Questions to Answer:
    • How has technology fundamentally changed assessment strategies, and what are ways that institutions can use technology to assess their campuses?
    • Is technology the final bridge to encourage collaboration between student affairs and academic affairs?
    • Is online research a respected way to do scholarly work, and will an expansion of online research gain increased respect within the higher education community?
    • What has technology done to help institutions reach out to the rest of the world?
  • Technological Assessments: How are our departments doing?
    • Discussion on weekly assignments
    • Opportunity for colleagues to add to each group’s work
  • Class Discussion on Readings, Week’s Questions to Answer
  • Weekly Assignment: be prepared to present final project
  • Readings for Week Fourteen: none
week fourteen final project presentations
Week Fourteen: Final Project Presentations
  • Final project presentations (V, A, R/W, K): using technology tools of students choosing, each students will share with the class the answer to the course question.
  • Course evaluation:
    • Topics missing
    • Topics obsolete
    • Open comments
  • Standard departmental evaluation
technology s impact on our creation of this course
Technology’s Impact on Our Creation of This Course
  • Scheduling conflicts never gave all three presenters the opportunity to work in the same place at the same time.
  • Early ideas and brainstorming were generated separately and shared during meetings with two group members present at one time.
  • Bulk of class creation and PowerPoint presentation occurred with one member in another state. Progress was sent via email and idea-generation was communicated through teleconferencing with the third member.
  • Without many of the modern-day technologies examined in our course, this presentation would not have occurred!