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2004 Virtual Case Study Competition “Student Affairs & Technology” PowerPoint Presentation
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2004 Virtual Case Study Competition “Student Affairs & Technology”
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  1. 2004 Virtual Case Study Competition “Student Affairs & Technology” Presented by Phillip “Flapp” Cockrell Murillo Soranso Korrin Stanek John Stinchon FIU

  2. Introduction Greetings from Florida International University, the TOP, URBAN, PUBLIC, RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY, in sunny Miami, Florida. The CSSSC (Cockrell, Soranso, Stanek, and Stinchon Consortium) has worked diligently over the past week to create an outline for a course that we strongly believe and support. Graduate students need to become familiar with the challenges and advancements that technology brings into the field of student affairs. This presentation will convince you that technology is essential to student affairs in order to provide the best possible service to our students. We decided to provide you with a detailed course outline for the class, which includes the purpose of the class, course requirements, a class by class description, and suggested assignments. We would like to stress the adaptability of our proposed course to different programs. As you will notice, we provide a lot of freedom and flexibility in our approach. Without further ado, click on and enjoy the presentation!

  3. Technology and Student Affairs Proposed Course Outline

  4. EDH 6284 The Role of Technology In Higher Education St. Phillip Stanek University at Soranso

  5. Purpose of the Course • To provide new student affairs professionals with an understanding of the impact of technology on student learning; • To integrate technology into the classroom via email, a community building chat room, message boards, etc. to provide students with an advanced approach to learning; • To survey and collect information on different technological models used in student affairs to gain insight on how technology impacts student affairs departments; • To evaluate and assess the importance of technology used in student affairs and its impact on student learning.

  6. Course Requirements • This class will meet once a week in a traditional classroom environment; however, some classes will take place in a virtual setting. • All students will need to familiarize themselves with PantherSpace. PantherSpace is the web-based tool, which students can utilize to upload their work into the server for grading purposes and peer review. It also provides features such as email, a community building chat room, message boards, links to other website, and course materials which include the syllabus, articles, and assignment descriptions. • Communication must take place via email or the community building chat room during the virtual office hours set by the instructor. Virtual office hours are the times when the instructor will be available in the community building chat room. • Students will be expected to continue class discussions during the week via features of PantherSpace. Disclaimer: PantherSpace is one approach to creating a paperless class, which we are trying to achieve. PantherSpace is not a real software application, although similar tools are available (i.e. Blackboard and WebCT)

  7. This section outlines the desired goals for each class section. At the conclusion of each class, the instructor should feel as though he/she has accomplished each learning objective. This section offers recommended readings that enhance the understanding of the topic for the week. Understanding the Class Structure Below is a framework of how each class is organized. Each section of this framework should be included in the planning of each class. Each slide contains all the following sections: Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • This section shares some suggested approaches to reach the learning objectives. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • This section provides websites that supplement the readings and develops an understanding of the technology being discussed during the week.

  8. Students will learn about the development and history of technology in higher education; Students will discuss ways in which technology impacts universities, specifically student affairs departments. The Internationalizing Influences of New Communication Technologies by Sydney R. Grant Dimensions of Technology Change by Steven W. Gilbert How Computers Change the Way We Think by Sherry Turkle Class 1 - Foundations of Technology Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Share history of technology in higher education and facilitate class discussion; • Ask students to reflect when they remember being introduced to technologies in education. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • None

  9. Students will have an understanding of how technology is being utilized throughout student affairs departments; Students will learn different ways to use technology in research; Students will understand the importance of why technology is being incorporated into student affairs departments. Student Affairs Web Site by John Seabreeze Cross-Town Partnership by Nancy Gainer Application of Technology to Assist Student Affairs Researchers Elizabeth A. by William, Carey M. Anderson Class 2 - Technology Today Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • By using on campus computer resources, show students how to use specific websites to gather information; • Have students engage in small group discussions about what type of technology resources they utilize on a daily basis. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.testudo.umd.edu/

  10. Students will learn about current trends of technology in student affairs departments; Students will learn how to integrate technology outside of the classroom, facilitate discussions via electronic boards, a community chat room, etc.; Students will learn how technology contributes to new and improved ways of communicating effectively with students, faculty, and staff. Integrating Information Technology into Student Affairs Graduate Programs by Catherine McHugh Engstrom Current and Emerging Applications of Technology to Promote Student Involvement and Learning by Paul Treuer and Linda Belote Using Technology in Assessment and Evaluation by Gary R. Hanson Using Best Practices, Workflow, and Object Technologies to Improve Higher Education Management by Frank Tait Class 3 – Technological Trends in Student Affairs Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Facilitate class discussion based on readings and information within the news from suggested website. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.syllabus.com

  11. Students will become aware of different technological issues that affect student affairs departments; Students will discuss some of the current problems that are associated with using technology in student affairs. Technology, Higher Education, and a Very Foggy Crystal Ball by Brian L. Hawkins The Integration of Technology with the Management of Student Service by Larry Moneta Class 4 – Issues in Technology Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Examine and discuss the negative impact that technology may have in student affairs. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.syllabus.com

  12. Students will read about current legal cases related to technology; Students will study ethical standards as it relates to technology at different universities and colleges; Students will discuss ethical implications related to the use of technology in higher education and student affairs. Legal, Ethical, and Policy Issues by Rodney J. Petersen, Marjorie W. Hodges Theorizing the Unintended Consequences of Instant Messaging for Worker Productivity by Julie Rennecker and Lindsey Godwin Impact of Technology on Learning by Kimberly Gustafson Computer and the University Attorney: An Overview of Computer Law on Campus by John Lautsch US anti-spam law fails to bite from BBC News Class 5 – Legal and Ethical Standards in Technology Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Analyze the legal implications of technology and current legal cases; • Provide class with scenarios that will engage students in discussions about ethical decision making and legal issues in technology. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • None

  13. Students will learn about different models and software used to enhance technology within student affairs departments; Students will learn how to critically assess current models, which are being used in academia; Students will be challenged to think of new models or software to enhance student services. Applications of Technology by Catherine McHugh Engstrom Information Technology and Student Affairs: Planning for the Twenty-First Century by Karley Ausiello and Barry Wells Class 6 – Technological Models & Software Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Discuss models and software and how institutions utilize technology to enhance student services. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.fiu.edu/~gato • University of Maryland • PeopleSoft

  14. Students will learn how technology can positively and negatively influence student learning; Students will learn how student affairs professionals can increase student learning through technology. Integrating Information Technology into Student Affairs Graduate Programs by Catherine McHugh Engstrom Information Technology and Student Affairs: Planning for the Twenty-First Century by Karley Ausiello and Barry Wells Application of Technology to Assist Student Affairs Researchers by Elizabeth A. William and Carey M. Anderson The Impact of Technologies on Learning by Kimberly Gustafon Using Learning Styles to Adapt Technology for Higher Education by Terry O’Connor Class 7 – Influence of Technology on Student Learning Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Bring in Vice President of Student Affairs or Student Services or equivalent professional to discuss how technology is linked to student learning; • Discuss ways to address learning styles through technology. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.fiu.edu/~gato • www.gomath.com • Onlinetutor.cu.edu

  15. Students will about new teaching styles that utilize technology (i.e. on-line course syllabus, email, community chat room, message boards, etc.); Students will discuss how technology affects faculty, their research, and their opportunity for scholarship; Students will analyze different ways that academic affairs departments currently use technology. Using Software: A Guide to Ethical and Legal Use of Software for Members of the Academic Community by EDUCOM and ADAPSO The Next Wave: Liberation Technology by John M. Unsworth Why MIT Decided to Give Away All Its Course Materails via the Internet by Charles M. Vest Using Learning Styles to Adapt Technology for Higher Education by Terry O’Connor Addressing Diverse Learning Styles Through the Use of Multimedia by Susan M. Montgomery Class 8 – Academic Affairs and Technology Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Bring in Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs or equivalent professional to discuss how technology is being integrated into academia. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.blackboard.com • www.WebCT.com • www.english.upenn.edu

  16. Students will learn about the costs or expenses associate with bringing technology to universities; Students will critically assess the financial advantages and disadvantages to implementing technology in university services. PeopleSoft Gartner Research 2002 Funding Raising: Managing Data Is a Key Task by Florence Olsen The Integration of Technology with the Management of Student Service by Larry Moneta Technology, Higher Education, and a Very Foggy Crystal Ball by Brian L. Hawkins Many Attempts at Distance Learning are Impeded by Unforeseen Political and Financial Problems by Goldie Blumen Class 9 – Financial Implications Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Bring in Vice President of Business and Finance or equivalent professional to discuss funding for technology in Higher Education. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • www.PeopleSoft.com • www.syllabus.com

  17. After being exposed to the different issues, trends, and models, students will question the viability of campus-free institutions; Students will be introduced to the different types of distance programs, varying from on-line courses to fully established degree seeking programs; Students will have an understanding of how distance learning impacts student affairs departments. The Integration of Technology with the Management of Student Service by Larry Moneta Many Attempts at Distance Learning are Impeded by Unforeseen Political and Financial Problems by Goldie Blumen The Virtual Classroom: Using Computer-Mediated Communication for Univeristy Teaching by Starr Roxanne Hiltz Avoiding the Quality/Quantity Trade-Off in Distance Education by Drs. Douglas L. Heerema and Richard L. Rogers Class 10 – Campus-Free Institution Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Engage class in a discussion about advantages and disadvantages of distance learning programs. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • University of Phoenix • Online Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

  18. Students will explore the learning technology standards and their implications in student affairs; Using the Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) model as a framework, students will be challenged to conceptualize possible technological standards in student affairs. Learning Technologies Content Standard CAS Document Class 11 – Technology Standards in Student Affairs Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Provide students with a copy of the CAS document for Student Affairs and generate a list of technology regulations. Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • None

  19. Students will understand the philosophies, theories, and rationales for the use of technology; Students will evaluate how the integration of distance learning, into the classroom, affects student affairs departments. Class 12 – Putting Technology to Work Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • This class takes place in a virtual classroom. In order to experience the distance learning approach, students and instructor will communicate via e-mail, chat room, or instant messenger for the duration of the class. Suggested Readings • None Websites to Visit • None

  20. Students will assess the different approaches and share the advantages and disadvantages of technology in student affairs; Students will be able to effectively assess technological services provided in various student affairs departments. Re-read previous readings prior to class discussion Class 13 – Pros and Cons of Technology Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Bring in Chief Information Officer to discuss pros and cons of technology in student affairs. • Divide class into two groups and have each group defend a different stance on technology Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • None

  21. Students will have an opportunity to discuss the future role of technology in student affairs; As challenges emerge within the student affairs division, students should be able to make recommendations for new technology. The Chronicle Review: Information Technology Section B; January 30, 2004 Values and Principles Gulding Technology Decision Making for the Future by Susan B. Komives and Rodney J. Petersen Class 14 – Future of Technology in Student Affairs Learning Objectives Suggested Class Approach • Open forum discussion Suggested Readings Websites to Visit • None

  22. Article Critiques Students can find articles related to the use of technology in higher education. After reading the articles, students can write a reflective response. Students want to find articles that are current and with relevant issues to higher education. Institutional IT Survey Students are asked to evaluate the technological advancements of their alma mater. They will consider the models and technologies used in the university. For example, students can analyze the enrollment tool, the way financial aid works, how housing uses technology, and so on. Students should consider factors like pros and cons, costs, marketing the product, and functionality. In addition, to make this assignment more challenging, the instructor can request students to compare and contrast the services in their alma mater to other institutions whose systems are well developed, like University of Maryland’s Testudo tool. Case Studies Students can be given scenarios in which they must implement a technological solution to a problem in student affairs. Some possible scenarios can be created in departments like tutoring services, campus life, housing, and enrollment services. This activity must be done in a group. Software Evaluation Students will evaluate software or technological models that are used in student affairs to help with departmental goals and student learning. In the evaluation process, students should understand how the software works, its uses, the pros and cons in using this package, and other observations. This assignment should be done individually, but it can also be implemented for team work. Research Paper Students should choose a topic that they would like to learn more about in technology and its use in student affairs. Research should be conducted. The paper is to consist of an analytical look into the proposed topic. Topics should be narrow and attempt to provide a solution to issues that emerge from the topic. Suggested Class Assignments The instructor can use the following assignments in a way that best suits the learning objectives.

  23. Justification for Proposed Course Focus: Student Affairs Departments • With the new advances in technology, student affairs departments must keep up to date with the benefits and drawbacks of new models and software being implemented into the profession; • With the use of technology, student affairs practitioners can efficiently manage data in ways that can enhance the productivity of their work. Examples are services like one-stop-shop approaches and research initiatives to better serve departments; • Technology allows for new ways to build community through listserv, community chat rooms, online forums, etc. Student affairs professionals can use these new ways of building community to innovatively collaborate with other units to achieve departmental goals.

  24. Justification for Proposed Course Focus: Enhancing Student Learning • Providing students with a technology-oriented environment is crucial for today’s learners. The twenty-first century student expects the use of technology in their educational career. The suggested course work allows for better understanding of the needs of these students; • Technology acknowledges the different learning styles and maintains connections to student learning. With technology, virtually any learning opportunity can be implemented with the help of computer graphics, and functionality of the World Wide Web. • With current and new technology, college administrators will save a large amount of time in tasks that would otherwise hinder their productivity. This factor ultimately contributes to the real focus of college faculty and administrators, which is to provide seamless learning for all college students.

  25. In Conclusion… With current and new technology, college administrators will save a large amount of time in tasks that would otherwise hinder their productivity. This factor ultimately contributes to the real focus of college faculty and administrators, which is to provide seamless learning for all college students.

  26. We appreciate your attention.

  27. References Anderson, C. & Williams, E. (1999). Applications of technology to assist student affairs researchers. New Directions for Students Services, 85, 61-71. Ausiello, K. & Wells, B. Information technology and student affairs: Planning for the twenty-first century. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 71-81. BBC News. (2004, February 09). US anti-spam law fails to bite. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/technology/3465307.stm Belote, L. & Treuer, P. (1997). Current and emerging applications of technology to promote student involvement and learning. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 17 – 30. Blumen, G. (1991). Many attempts at distance learning are impeded by unforeseen political and financial problems [Electronic Version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, a23-a24. Engstrom, C. M. (1997). Integrating information technology into student affairs graduate programs. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 59-69.

  28. References Gainer, N. (2002, February). A cross-town partnership [Electronic version]. Syllabus. Gilbert, S. W. (2001, July). Dimensions of technology change [Electronic version]. Syllabus. Grant, S. W. (1999). The internationalizing influences of new communications technology. New Directions for Student Services, 86, 59-64. Gustafson, K. (2003). The impact of technologies on learning [Electronic version]. Planning for Higher Education, 32(2), 37-43. Hanson, G. (1997). Using technology in assessment and evaluation. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 31-44. Hawkins, B.L. (2000). Technology, higher education, and a very foggy crystal ball. EDUCAUSE Review, 35(6), 64-73. Heerema, D. L. & Rogers, R. L. (2001, December). Avoiding the quality/quantity trade-off in distance education. The Journal: Online Technological Horizons in Education. Retrieved February 14, 2004, from http://www.thejournal.com/magazine/vault/articleprintversion.cfm?aid=3753

  29. References Hiltz, S. R. (1986). The virtual classroom: Using computer-mediated communication for university teaching. Journal of Communication, 36, 99-104. Komivers, S. R., & Petersen, R. J. (1997). Values and principle guiding technology decision making for the future. New Direction for Student Services, 78, 83-95. Moneta, L. (1997). The integration of technology with the management of student services. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 5-16. Montgomery, S. M. (1995). Addressing diverse learning styles through the use of multimedia. Retrieved February 14, 2004, from University of Illinois, Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs Web site: http://www.vpaa.uillinois.edu/reports_retreats/tid/resources/montgomery.html O’Connor, T. (1997). Using Learning Styles to Adapt Technology for Higher Education. Retrieved February 14, 2004, from Indiana State University, Center for Teaching and Learning Web site: http://www.indstate.edu/ctl/styles/learning.html PeopleSoft, Inc. (2000). PeopleSoft for Higher Education. Retrieved February 14, 2004, from http://www.peoplesoft.com/media/en/pdf/PWSSVIHCPGC_MDA.pdf

  30. References Peterson, R. J., Hodges, M. W. (1997). Legal, ethical, and policy issues. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 45-58. Rennecker, J. & Godwin, L. (2003). Theorizing the unintended consequences of instant messaging for worker productivity. Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Environments, Systems and Organizations, 3 (Summer). Retrieved February 15, 2004, from http://interruptions.net/literature/Rennecker-Sprouts03.pdf Seabreeze, J. (1997). Student affairs world wide web sites. New Directions for Student Services, 78, 97-103. Tait, F. (1998, May). Using best practices, workflow, and object technologies to improve higher education management [Electronic version]. The Technology Source. Using software: A guide to the ethical and legal use of software for members of the academic community. (1991). Retrieved February 13, 2004, from http://www.cni.org/docs/infopols/EDUCOM.html Yanosky, R., Zastrocky, M., & Harris, D. (2002). Peoplesoft in higher education. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from California State University, Common Management System Web site: http://cms.calstate.edu/T6_Documents/NewsAndPublications/General/GartnerPSHigherED042502.pdf