NUTRIENTS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

amiel
nutrients n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
NUTRIENTS PowerPoint Presentation
play fullscreen
1 / 17
Download Presentation
NUTRIENTS
206 Views
Download Presentation

NUTRIENTS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. NUTRIENTS

  2. Nutrients Living matter is made of cells, but what are cells made of? Cells are made of molecules based on based on 4 main chemical elements: carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen (plus lots of other elements) and the many compounds that can be made from combining these elements.

  3. Organic and Inorganic Compounds All living things are made up of compounds that are classified as: Organic Inorganic Rocks and other nonliving things contain inorganic compounds. Organic compounds are more related to living things: carbon and hydrogen.

  4. Organic and Inorganic Compounds Even though organic compound are more related to living things, some nonliving things, there are some exceptions. Coal is a nonliving thing that contains organic compounds. Why? It was formed from dead and decaying plants, which are living things.

  5. Organic Compounds Carbohydrates Fats or Lipids Proteins Vitamins

  6. Carbohydrates Made up of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen. They are organic molecules that supply energy for cell processes. It is the main source (and quickest form) of energy for all cellular functions.

  7. Carbohydrates Classification Simple or Monosaccharides Glucose, Sucrose and Fructose (all fruits, dairy products, honey, Complex or Disaccharides/Polysaccharides. Starch and Fibers (bread, pastas, grains, beans, lentils, and root vegetable like potatoes). More examples: coke, cakes, candies, sauces.

  8. Carbohydrates Animals and humans store excess glucose in the form of glycogen in the liver and muscles. Between meals the liver breaks down glycogen to glucose and releases it into the blood stream to supply glucose to cells in need. If people consume more carbohydrates than they need at the time, the body stores some of these carbohydrates within cells (as glycogen) and converts the rest to fat.

  9. Fats or Lipids Made up of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and phosphorus. A lot of lipids function as long-term energy storage. Lipids do not mix with water. They store and release even larger amounts of energy than carbohydrates do. The body needs fats for grow and energy.

  10. Fats or Lipids One gram of fat stores more than twice as much energy as one gram of carbohydrates. Lipids consist of glycerol and fatty acids. Classification Saturated: Meat, butter, cheese, oil. Unsaturated: avocado, olive, peanut, corn, sunflower, etc.

  11. Fats or Lipids One gram of fat stores more than twice as much energy as one gram of carbohydrates. Lipids consist of glycerol and fatty acids. Classification Saturated: Meat, butter, cheese, oil. Unsaturated: avocado, olive, peanut, corn, sunflower, etc.

  12. Proteins Proteins are composed of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and sometimes sulfur. The building blocks of proteins are aminoacids. There are 20 different. Proteins are the building blocks of many structures in organisms. Muscles contains larger amounts of proteins.

  13. Proteins Proteins provide the basic structure for the muscles, bones, hair, skin, cartilages and circulatory system. Classification: Simple: sufficient amounts of all the essential amino acids. Meat, eggs, fish, etc. Conjugated: some of the essential amino acid. Example: beans, rice, nuts, etc.

  14. Vitamins Vitamins are organic compounds required as nutrients, in tiny amounts by an organism. Our body needs them in order to grow properly, so we can grow and develop.

  15. Vitamins Vitamin A – carrots – see at night Vitamin B – green vegetables - energy Vitamin C – oranges – heal cuts / flu Vitamin D – bones - milk Vitamin E – tissues (eyes, skin) - grains

  16. Minerals The same as vitamins, our body needs them in order to grow properly, so we can grow and develop. Classification: Macro minerals: our body needs larger amounts. Calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium and sulfur. Trace minerals: iron, manganese, copper, zinc, cobalt, fluoride, and iodine.

  17. Minerals Calcium – milk, cheese, yogurt, salmon and broccoli. Zinc – beef, pork, lamb. Potassium – bananas and tomatoes