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Sequoyah ( a.k.a George Gist). Inventor of the Cherokee Alphabet. Sequoyah. Born near Tuskeegee, Tennesee in 1776 Died near Tyler, Texas in 1843 His mother was the daughter of a Cherokee chief and his father was a Virginia fur trader named Nathaniel Gist. Fleeing Tennessee.

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sequoyah a k a george gist

Sequoyah(a.k.a George Gist)

Inventor of the Cherokee Alphabet

sequoyah
Sequoyah
  • Born near Tuskeegee, Tennesee in 1776
  • Died near Tyler, Texas in 1843
  • His mother was the daughter of a Cherokee chief and his father was a Virginia fur trader named Nathaniel Gist.
fleeing tennessee
Fleeing Tennessee
  • Sequoyah fled Tennessee because of the encroachment of whites as a youth.
  • He moved to Georgia where he became a silversmith.
how it all began
How it all began
  • While Sequoyah was working as a silversmith, a man asked him to sign his work, as the white silversmiths had done.
  • Sequoyah, however, did not know how to write his name.
  • This sent him to Charles Hicks, a wealthy farmer, to teach him how to write his name.
the beginning of a new language
The beginning of a new language:
  • Hicks showed Sequoyah how spell his name by writing the letters on a piece of paper.
  • In 1809 Sequoyah began developing the idea of a Cherokee writing system.
cherokee war
Cherokee War
  • Then he moved to Willstown, Alabama and joined the Cherokee Regiment in a battle against the Creeks.
  • This battle became known as the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.
  • During this battle, Sequoyah realized the importance of a writing system because the Cherokees were unable to communicate with their families during the war.
characteristics of the writing system
Characteristics of the writing system
  • Sequoyah used a phonetic system, where each sound made in speech was represented by a symbol.
  • He called it “Talking Leaves”, 85 letters that make-up the Cherokee syllabary
implementation of the cherokee syllabary
Implementation of the Cherokee Syllabary
  • Sequoyah went before the council to propose his new syllabary.
  • After the completion of the syllabary in 1821, it was rapidly adopted by many Cherokees.
  • Within two years many Cherokees had learned the syllabary and it made it possible for them to print books and newspapers in their language.
life after developing the syllabary
Life after developing the syllabary
  • After Sequoyah developed the Cherokee syllabary, he went into politics.
  • He was elected as a Cherokee delegate to the United States government in Washington, D.C.
  • In 1824, the National Council at New Echota struck a silver medal in Sequoyah’s honor.
sequoyah s impact
Sequoyah’s Impact
  • The impact made by Sequoyah’s development of the Cherokee alphabet can be seen throughout the Cherokee history.
  • It made it possible for them to document their experiences and increase their communications between each other.
resources
Resources
  • http://ngeorgia.com/ang/Sequoyah(a.k.a_George_Gist)
  • http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/biographies/sequoyah/
  • http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-618&hl=y