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Best Housing Practices
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  1. Best Housing Practices Diversity, Affordability, Community, and Security

  2. Best Housing Practices Affordability Diversity; life cycle housing Affordable Housing Density impacts Income groups Neighborhoods & Community Spatial layout Common spaces Safety & Security Access Territory Today’s Agenda

  3. Local Housing Performance ?

  4. Life cycle housing Density of 6-7 du/acre Cost effective site development/construc. Affordable single family homes for moderate income households Affordable multi-family housing for low income households Use government programs to aid mix Mix housing within market limits Ewing’s Best Housing Practices

  5. Offer life cycle housing • Projects with housing types, sizes, prices for singles, young families, empty nesters • Advantages: • Social networks persist • Children stay in familiar schools • Elderly remain near family, friends • Demand taps many market segments • Opportunity to integrate affordable units

  6. Affordability and Income • Affordable housing: monthly expenses below 30% of gross household income • Rent or principal and interest payments • Utilities, taxes, and insurance • Income classes • Moderate: 80-120% of median income • Low: 50-80% of median income • Very low: below 50% of median income

  7. Target net density 6-7 du/acre average without crowded look Single family detached zero lot line Z lots zipper lots granny flats small lots, short setbacks Single family attached town houses Multi-family attached duplex triplex fourplex apartments low rise high rise stacked flats Density Creates Affordability

  8. SE Orlando Standards

  9. SE Orlando Standards

  10. Hard Costs: Detached Housing Land, site improvement, construction costs vary by housing type

  11. Z lot: narrow, angled houses, windows on 4 sides (vs zero lot line blank wall) Zipper lot: wider with houses parallel to street Alternative width lot: some houses end on, some parallel

  12. House Setbacks & Community

  13. Amberleigh, Mill Creek WA • Appearance: modest s.f. homes of various styles on 15 acre site in suburban Seattle • Actually subdivision of 88 duplex & 4-plex units; net density = 7.6 du/acre; gross = 5.8 • Common walls concealed • Garages in hidden parking courts (44’ x 64’); 4 spaces/unit; total 352 spaces plus on-street • Lots average 5000 sq ft; 11’ setbacks • 1/2 ac. community park; 50’ native plant buffer

  14. Amberleigh House Types

  15. Amberleigh Duplex, 4-Plex Plan

  16. Amberleigh Houses & Parking 1 drive per 4 units Hidden parking court & garages

  17. Amberleigh Common Space Community park

  18. Security Concerns • Jane Jacobs Life and Death of GreatAmerican Cities (1961) • Demarcate public & private spaces • Maximize eyes on the street • Promote regular sidewalk activity • Design fine grain building patterns (not superblocks)

  19. Defensible Space • Oscar Newman Creating Defensible Space (1966) • Goal: reduce crime opportunities by design • Natural surveillance (eyes on street) • Access control (limit access sts & paths) • Territorial reinforcement (express ownership) • Implementation: design safety reviews(parking, landscaping, lighting)

  20. High rise (inward), Walkup (on st) at same density

  21. 3 single family types Private (darkest), semiprivate, semipublic, & public (lightest) space (most eyes on st)

  22. Walkup apartments Walkup apartments and their space controls (some eyes on st)

  23. Highrise apartments Elevator apartments & space control (no eyes on st)

  24. Comparison of outdoor space/housing type Town houses with little public (lightest), much private (darkest) space Garden apartments with some semiprivate space High rise apartments with all public space

  25. Five Oaks Redevelopment, Dayton OH

  26. 5 Oaks Redevelopment • Divided 1/2 sq mile community into 10 mini-neighborhoods, each w/ 3-6 streets • Closed 35 streets & alleys; added gates; converted streets to cul de sacs • Reduced cut through traffic by 67%, crime by 26% • Raised housing values 15%

  27. 5 Oaks, Mini Neighborhoods Gate as constructed

  28. Mini Neighborhood Plan, Gates & Entries

  29. Diggs Town, Norfolk VA • Redevelopment of a 1950s public housing project (428 units) to add: • porches • fences • blocks • streets • public spaces • neighborhood

  30. Diggs Town Redevelopment

  31. Changing entries & porches

  32. Creating Private Territories

  33. Design Can Matter • Housing affordability • Sense of community • Safety and security